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March 04, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-04

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, March 4, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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FRo-Wo r
IEZIl TECHNICOLOR*
ffrOCo,.nme Pcturt
TODAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 p.m.

Program Information 662-6264

LAST TIMES TONIGHT!
MARLO THOMAS
AS
"JENNY"
SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,7, 9 P.M.

STARTS TOMORROW !

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
FRENCH PRESIDENT GEORGES POMPIDOU returned to
France yesterday bidding a smiling "au revoir" to the American
people.
Pompidou's visit has been marked by numerous pro-Israel de-
monstrations protesting a French sale of 110 Mirage jet fighters to
Arab Libya.
At one point last weekend Pompidou was physically assaulted
by a crowd in Chicago. His anger over the incident threatened a diplo-
matic crisis, with the French president reportedly planning to cut
short his visit.
However, President Nixon moved quickly to prevent a possible
international incident. He telephoned Pompidou to apologize, then
flew to New York to take part in a Waldorf-Astoria banquet honoring
the French dignitary.
THE FIVE CONVICTED DEFENDANTS in the Chicago 7
trial have been billed $41,748 in court costs.
In sentencing the five defendants to five years in prison, Judge
Julius Hoffman fined them $5,000 each plus court costs.
The costs are for court transcripts, docket fees, and the cost of
government witnesses. The biggest expense was for the transcript-
$32,917.
The bill has been sent to defense attorneys William Kunstler
and Leonard Weinglass and can be, paid by any or all of the de-
fendants.
The bill cannot be collected, however, if the convictions are over-
ruled on appeal.
* * *
THE EDITOR of a Polish-American newspaper has launched
a campaign against Polish jokes.
Chester Grabowski, editor of the Post Eagle, an English-language
weekly published in Clifton, N.J., said that he and others in his cam-
paign do not mind "inoffensive" jokes about the Polish, but they do
mind all the jokes that "make the Polish look like fools."
Grabowski accused television as being among the worst offend-
ers in terms of perpetrating offensive Polish jokes. He specifically
singled out Rowan and Martin's "Laugh-In," the "Tonight Show," the
"Carol Burnett Show," and the "Joan Rivers Show."
- * *
A HOUSE-SENATE CONFERENCE ,COMMITTEE yesterday
approved a bill that would bar cigarette advertising from radio
and television as of Jan. 1, 1971.
The bill now goes back to the House and Senate for almost cer-
tain approval.
"By next year, cigarette advertising will move into the history
books of television," declared Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, D-Wash.,
chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee.
* * *
POLICE AND WHITE PARENTS clashed at a recently inte-
grated school in Lamar, S.C.
The group of 100 whites attacked two school buses carrying
black pupils. The blacks were being bused to the previously all-white
school in accordance with a federal court integration order. Several
blacks were injured by bricks and shattered glass.
School officials removed the 32 black pupils before the buses
were overturned by the crowd of whites. Police dispersed the whites
with teargas after a short battle.
BRITAIN YESTERDAY asked for an urgent meeting of the
U.N. Security Council to oppose recognition of the newly pro-
claimed Republic of Rhodesia.
On Monday, Prime Minister Ian Smith declared Rhodesia a
republic, thus severing all ties with Britain. Rhodesia declared in-
dependence in November of 1965, but until Monday recognized the
British crown as sovereign.

TICKE TS NOW ON SALE !
PTP Ticket Office

I

dA REMARKABLE MUSICAL NIT."
-LIFE MAc.
PHIL MIMI
F ORD IH INES

-Associated Press
Protesting Mrs. Nixon
The group pictured sit outside the downtown hotel in Lexington, Ky., where Mrs. Richard Nixon
was having lunch yesterday. Although more than 1,000 persons turned out to cheer Mrs. Nixon on
her visit to Lexington there were about 50 persons who protested her presence, carrying signs .
such as "Yankee, go home." There were no incidents and the protests were orderly.
SUPREME COURT TEST:
i !
Emergency riot legislation
claimed- to be unconsitutional

I

Nixon asks
special rail
legislation
Nation-wide strike
slated for tonight
WASHINGTON (M -- Presi-
dent Nixon asked Congress
yesterday to block a nation-
wide rail strike by ordering ac-
ceptance of a tentative wage
and job 'Jurisdiction settle-
ment for some 45,000 workers.
"A nation-wide stoppage of rail
service would cause hardships to
human beings and harm to our
economy, and must not be per-
mitted to take place," Nixon said
in a message to Congress just two
hours after four AFL-CIO shop-
craft unions called a strike for one
minute after midnight tonight.
"Speed is essential," said Sec-
retary of Labor George P. Shultz
in a White House briefing ex-
plaining Nixon's unprecedented
proposal for a mandatory settle-
ment.
"We hope Congress will act
quickly," Shultz said. "We'd like
to see them act tomorrow."
Nixon's bill would impose as
final a settlement worked out by
negotiators for the four unions
but rejected by a majority of the
members of one union. The settle-
ment would include a 68-cent raise
in current wages of $3.60 an hour
for the workers who repair and
maintain railroad equipment.
It would also include the con-
troversial provision to permit the
workers of all four unions to cross
each others traditional job juris-
diction lines to do a limited
amount of work, which therail-
road industry insisted'upon to in-
crease efficiency.
Members of the Machinists,
Electricians and Boilermakers un-
ions had voted approval but re-
jection by less than 3,000 sheet-
metal workers has prevented a
voluntary settlement.
"We must not submit to the
chaos of a nation-wide rail stop-
page because a minority of the af-
fected workers rejected a contract
agreed to by their leadership,"
Nixon said. "The public interest
comes first."
Asked if the bill was likely to
become a precedent for manda-
tory labor settlements in all such
cases, Shultz said "Of course
not." He added that such emer-
gency cases are rare.
Chief union negotiator William
W. Winpisinger announced th e
nation-wide strike call, saying a
federal court order barringa strike
against only one railroad had left
the unions no alternative.

MUSKET
All Campus Theatrical Company

1

WASHINGTON (RP) -The local;
ordinances that were hurriedly en-
acted to give mayors emergency
powers during racial outbreaks of
the past several years are ap-
proaching their ultimate legal
tests.
The Supreme Court was asked
yesterday to rule on the validity
of ordinances which give local
authorities the right to prohibit
assemblies because of suspected
civil unrest.
Such measures were passed in
numerousU.S. cities to cope with
racial disturbances which erupted
in the late 1960s, particularly
those following the assassination
of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in
April 1968.
The ordinances allow mayors or
other authorities to take various
emergency steps, but nearly all
Carey leaves
'U' news post
Christopher R. (Chris) Carey,
managing editor of the Univer-
sity's News Service since October,
1966, will leave that position at,
the end of this month to work on
the copy desk of the Detroit Free
Press.
The change represents a return
to newspaper work for Carey who
was employed on the copy desk
of the Louisville (Ky.) Courier-
Journal before coming to the Uni-
versity in June, 1965.
He was employed as a public af-
fairs officer at the University
Medical Center before moving to
the position from which he is now
resigning.
Carey plans to commute daily
from his home in Ann Arbor. His
successor at News Service has not
been selected.

include the power to ban assem-
blies or to declare outright cur-
fews.
The particular ordinance to be
ruled upon by the Supreme Court
was passed in Philadelphia, and
although it is being attacked on
rather narrowly defined grounds
the outcome is expected to have
nationwide implications.
The petition filed with the court
appeals the convictions of three
persons arrested during demon-
strations that were held despite a'
proclamation issued immediately'
after King's death. The proclama-
tion banned outdoor assemblies of
12 or more people, with a few ex-
ceptions.
The first arrests were made April
6, 1968, at a tree-planting cere-
mony in Philadelphia's Roosevelt'
Park protesting the recommission-
ing of the battleship New Jersey
for service in the Vietnam war.
The ceremony had been planned

before the proclamation was is-
sued.
The petition says that while
participants in the tree-planting
ceremony were being arrested,
"more than 10,000 persons were
permitted to congregate, in the
Navy Yard, a few blocks away, to
take part in the public ceremonies
recommissioning the New Jersey."
"Appellants and more than 100
other persons whose cases await
the outcome of this appeal have
been convicted of crimes for their
quiet participation in open polit-
ical assemblies of a wholly peace-
ful character," the Supreme Court
was told.
To ban such assemblies and
make arrests under a broad pro-
clamation prohibiting peaceful as
well as violent or potentially vio-
lent gatherings, the appellants
argued, violates First Amendment
guarantees of free speech and as-
sembly.

Sea grams saved from pound

By BEVERLY MAZER
Last Thursday afternoon a
dog walked into W e s t Quad
cafeteria.
No disruption of cafeteria
procedure occurred; the dog sat
down among his owners a n d
quietly enjoyed the atmosphere..
Leon West, director of West
Quad, stood at the opposite end
of the cafeteria checking for
students without their meal
tickets. He spotted the dog and
reportedly jumped to throw
him out.
"Aw," yelled the students as
West chased the dog under the
tables. Frightened, the poor dog
yelped. West paid no attention,

grabbed the dog and walked out
of the cafeteria.
The dog, whose name is Sea-
grams, is a collie who has been
staying at Williams and Wen-
ley Houses in West Quad for the
past month-and-a-half, living
off table - scraps and snacks
from the students.
When he did not return as
usual Thursday night, residents
in West Quad got worried and
called West.
West informed them that he
had sent the dog -to the Wash-
tenaw County Humane Society
for "crossing cafeteria lines."
"He will be gassed within three
days if not bailed out," West
continued.
Disgusted, the students of
Wenley House hung up the
phone.
West later said that the dog
had been around too long with-
out anyone doing anything
about him. "I finally got tired of
fiddling around with him, so I

just kicked him out," said
West.
A group from Wenley and
Williams Houses headed by Tom
Kush, '71, and Ken Szozo, '73
A&D, started a committee, the
Seagrams Seven Ad Hoc Com-
mittee to rescue Seagrams from
a gassing.
Posters were put up denounc-
ing West's actions and asking
for money to help pay the fine.
Students claimed West then
went around West Quad ripping
them down.
Meanwhile, as West and the
West Quad "Seagrams Seven
Committee" battled it o ut, a
group from Delta Theta Phi law
fraternity - original owners of
Seagrams (alias Roger at the
time) - paid the fine and got
Seagrams out.
With Seagrams freed, West
Quad students claim the con-
flict has been resolved in their
favor.

II

_.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY 'with the support of the
MICHIGAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS, presents
THE ALVIN AlLEY
AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE
Pease Auditorium EMU, Ypsilanti, Michigan
MARCH 10, 12 -8 P.M.
General Admission-$2.00; Reserved-$3.00
Tickets available at EMU, McKenny Union; WSU Ticket Office;
J. L. Hudson Co.; Mail orders to University Activities Board, Mc-
Kenny Union, Ypsilanti, Michigan.

MR 2Bkg ! a R MI N N

I _ ' _ .. _.. ..___ -...- ... x- rx.

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