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March 03, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-03

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EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
presents
"THREE DOG NIGHT"
SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1970
8:30 P.M.
BowenFieldhouse, E.M.U., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Tickets: $3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Advance Tickets Available: E.M.U. McKenny Union, M.S.U.
University Center, J.L. Hudson Co.
Mail Order: Send check or money order payable to E.M.U., Uni-
versity Activities Board, McKenny Union, Ypsilanti, Mich.

House committee

probes

Black Panthers

WASHINGTON P) - A nationwide
congressional probe of the Black Pan-
ther Party will begin open hearings to-
morrow with witnesses who will accuse
the Panthers of attempted extortion,
mental imbalance, and using children
as a front for revolution.
Rep. Richard H. Ichord (D-Mo),
chairman of the House Internal Sec-
urity Committee (formerly the House
Un-American Activities Committee),
said that during the two days of hear-
ings, witnesses will also charge that
news coverage of Panther activities
"is one of the things that keeps them
going."
"We want to find out all we can
about the Black Panther Party. We
want to expose its finances, its ob-
jectives, its connections with what
may be hostile foreign powers, its num-
bers, and the tactics it uses to reach

its objectives," Ichord said in an in-
terview.
The party claims 27 chapters in 22
cities but won't reveal the size of its
membership. Estimates range from 800
to more than 4,000.
Federal grand juries at San Fran-
cisco, Chicago and New Haven, Conn,
also are investigating the party. Two
ad hoc committees, including one
headed by former Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark and the other composed of six
black congressmen, are probing police
reactions in shootouts with the Pan-
thers on Dec 4 in Chicago and Dec. 8
in Los Angeles.
The Internal Security Committee,
which began its probe of the Panthers
last October, voted to authorize the
investigation-recommended by Ichord
-after receiving a 12-page staff study
devoted almost entirely to press clip-

pings and public testimony on the
Black Panther Party.
The study accused the party of hav-
ing alliances in Communist China,
Cuba and Algeria, and also reported
other alliances including Students for
a Democratic Society and the U.S.
Communist Party.
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, when
questioned about Communist influence
on black militants, testified in a bud-
get hearing last April, "The Black
Panthers, the most violent of all, and
several others almost as bad, are or-
ganizations that the Communist Party
has not been able to control . . .
"This is pure and simple ganster-
ism," Hoover added. "They are recruit-
ing known criminals and hoodlums
and encouraging them to engage in a
broad range of terroristic tactics and
other criminal actions while explain-

ing that such actions, being revolu-
tionary in nature, are justified."
Hoover has since stated that Pan-
ters have killed five policemen. Charles
Garry, general counsel for the Black
Panther Party, says 28 Panthers have
been killed by police in what he calls
genocide.
The party's leadership also has been
reduced by self-exile and arrest. El-
dridge Cleaver, Minister of Informa-
tion, is in Algeria. Huey Newton,
founder of the party and its Minister
of Defense, is serving 15 years of
manslacghter in the killing of a po-
liceman. National Chairman ,Bobby
Seale is held at San Francisco jail
pending extradition to Connecticut
where he is charged with ordering the
murder of a Panther suspected of being
a police informant.
The first group to be investigated

will be a Panther chapter from
Ichord's home state of Missouri - a
Kansas City chapter of 20 to 40 mem-
bers. It was chosen, according to
Ichord, because it is "fairly typical,"
and hasn't been investigated by others.

Ichord said 10 to
appear, but refused
in advance "because
of harassment."

12
to
of

witnesses will
identify most
the possibility

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"One witness will be heard in execu-
tive session because of fear of violent
retaliation," he said.
Felix Pete O'Neal, chairman of the
Kansas City chapter who said neither
he nor his members have been called
to testify, said in a telephone inter-
view: "I know exactly every witness
who is subpoenaed. We certainly have
no intention of doing anything to
them."

A

page three

C14C

Sict~igaun

Datiti,

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764.0554

Tuesday,

March 3, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

!1 4']1.

IM; I I I 'I r!l itq,] w

I

IC

NON-PROFT CONCERT
March 6-FRIDAY
COUNTRY JOE
and THE FISH,
SAVAGE GRACE (from Detroit)

Light Shows

Phantasmagoria

Grand Valley State College

Field House
ALLENDALE, MICH.

7:30 P.M.

$3.00 at door

Mobe asks
comply-in
on draft
WASHINGTON ()-The anti-
war movement hopes to bury the
nation's draft system in an ava-
lanche of paperwork this month
through massive obedience to the!
most trivial and overlooked tech-
nicalities of Selective Service law.
They're calling it a "comply-in"
at the headquarters of New Mobil-
ization Committee to end the war
In Vietnam. It's the second phase
of New Mobe's "spring offensive,"
which focused last month on the
courts and will turn in April to,
dramatizing the link between the
and "taxes.
The week of March 16-22 will
be devoted, a New Mobe spokes-
man said, to draft-related activi-
ties aimed at tying up most of the
Although the Selective Service
nation's 4,1000 local draft boards.
system generally pays no attention
to its registrants once they've
passed the draftable age of 26, the
law-although overlooked 99 per
cent of the time-requires every
male born after Aug. 30, 1922, to
be registered and carry his draft
card with him.
"The law also requires registrants
to inform the draft boards within
10 days of any change in address
or status," said Mrs. Trudi Young,
the New Mobe spokesman. "This
means changes in religion, mental
attitude -and everything else. We
want everyone to take this law so
seriously that they inform their
board of every single change, even
if they're over-age or have already
completed their service."
Mrs. Young said New Mobe
hopes to recruit thousands of the
18 millionmen' in the 5-A over-
age classification into the paper-1
work war.
The antidraft activities this
month will culminate March 19
with massive sit-ins at the nation's
draft boards. The rest of the week
will be devoted to draft-counseling
sessions and leafletting of high
schools to inform students of
their rights under the draft laws.
Mrs. Young said New Mobe is
urging that all activities be kept
non-violent and legal. But the
antiwar group, she added, will
support local groups who find it
necessary to block the entrances
to draft board offices illegally.
A spokesman for Selective Serv-
ice headquarters had no comment
on the planned activities. But if
thousands over over-age men de-
cide to follow the law to the letter,
he said, "Lord help us."

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
FRENCH PRESIDENT Georges Pompidou accepted President
Nixon's apologies yesterday for the hostile reception he faced in
Chicago.
Nixon flew to New York last night to attend a French-American
dinner in Pompidou's honor, and tell him that the pro-Israel demon-
strations by about 10,000 people in Chicago Saturday did not repre-
sent the view of most Americans.
Pompidou's entourage had indicated that the French President
had been considering cutting short his visit because of the demon-
strations.
Jewish organizations had announced that they planned massive
anti-Pompidou turnouts during his visit to New York, to protest the
sale of 100 French Mirage jets to the Arab state of Libya. Mayor
John Lindsay, who declined to receive Pompidou officially, issued an
appeal to New Yorkers for courteous behavior.
LAOTIAN PREMIER Prince Souvanna Phouma has sum-
moned the top military leaders of his country to an emergency
meeting, informed sources said yesterday.
The meeting was called because of the rapidly deteriorating mili-
tary situation in Laos, which lost the strategic Plain of Jars to North
Vietnamese forces a week ago.
Commanding generals of the five military regions in 'Laos will
meet to discuss defense of the country's major cities, and place're-
quests for military equipment.
Souvanna Phouma, who is also the military leader of Laos, has
said in the past that he might ask the U.S. and other countries for
equipment, but would not request ground troops.
Meanwhile, in South Vietnam, American B52 bombers rained
tons of explosives Monday on the Mekong Delta's Seven Mountains
region, where North Vietnamese troops have been entrenched for
months.
A THREATENED RAIL STRIKE was blocked yesterday by
a preliminary injunction issued by a federal judge.
U. S. District Judge Howard Corcoran issued the restrain-
ing order against 'AFL-CIO's shoperaft unions, which planned to
strike against the Union Pacific railroad.
The judge denied a union request for an injunction against a
possible lockout by the industry in retaliation of the threatened un-
ion strike.;
Union members will meet today to decide whether to stage a
nationwide strike or to appeal Corcoran's ruling.
* * * *
COL. CARLOS ARANA OSORIO, Guatemala's r i g h 't ts t
presidential candidate, finished first in the election yesterday, but
lacked the majority needed to claim absolute victory.
Guatemala's congress will now elect a president, choosing between
Arana and Mario Fuentes Pieruccini of the Centrist Revolutionary
party, who came in second in the three-way election.
Congress is at present dominated by the Revolutionary- party.
WILLIAM KUNSTLER, Chicago 7 defense attorney, has called
on young people for massive peaceful demonstrations.
Speaking Sunday in Los Angeles, Kunstler said that demonstra-
tors were responsible for the release on bail of the seven defendants
of the conspiracy trial.
Kunstler called the release "a people's victory," and urged youth
to demonstrate "at every courthouse in the nation to fight oppres-
sion."

-Associated Press

GOP ladies on the road

MUSKET
All Campus Theatrical Company
Presents
THE AWARD WINNING MUSICAL

J'

Mrs. Lenore Romney (left), who is seeking the Republican U.S. Senate nomination in the state,
and Mrs. Richard Nixon speak to a crowd yesterday at the Lansing Airport. Lansing was the first
stop on the First Lady's volunteer project tour.
DEPUTY REGISTRARS USED:
New voter registration system
standardizes city procedures

**
* y
*******************************t

By TOM WIEDER
Students attempting to register
to vote in Ann Arbor -are encoun-
tering a more uniform registra-
tion system than in past years, ac-
cording to City Clerk Harold
Saunders.
The new system is the result of
attempts to standardize the pro-
cedures for b o t h students and
non-student residents of the city.
The main change in registra-
tion procedures is the institution
of a standard questionnaire which
must be filled out by all appli-
cants.
Registration has also been made
easier by the use of deputy regis-
trars, stationed at various places
throughout the city, who are au-
thorized to evaluate an applicant's
qualifications and approve or re-
ject his request for registration.
The changes have all come
about since Saunders took over

from John P. Bentley, who is now
City Treasurer, last December.
The questionnaire includes ques-
tions on general qualifications
and cites passages of the state
law on voting qualifications. It
also contains questions which per-
tain more specifically to students.
Conflicts about student regis-
tration have arisen in the past ov-
er a section of the s t a t e law
which declares that "no elector
shall be deemed to have gained or
lost residency by reason of being
a s t u d e n t in an institution of
higher education." This clause
had been frequently used to dis-
qualify students who attempted
to register.
Saunders denies that the new
procedures reflected a n y major
policy change. "It's just that ev-
eryone is being asked the same
questions in the same way," Saun-
ders says. "We're just trying to

get more uniformity in the sys-
tem."
Charges were levied against the
former City Clerk during regis-
tration for last year's mayoi'alty
campaign by students who said
they had to undergo more exten-
sive questioning than non-stu-
dents.
The deputy registrars were in-
stituted this year to make it easier
to register. Previously, all appli-
cants had to go to City Hall.
Registration for the April city
election at City Hall will be held
March 6 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
However, residents may also reg-
ister at the League and all fire
stations March 3 to March 5 from
5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and March 6 from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Leary sentenced on drug charge,

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HOUSTON, Tex. M) - Timo-
thy Leary was sentenced to 10
years in prison yesterday for smug-
gling marijuana from Mexico into
the United States.
Leary was taken immediately to
Santa Ana, Calif., where he faces
sentencing for possession of mari-
juana.
Leary's lawyer, Mitchell Stand-
ard of New York City, said he
would go to the 5th U.S. Circuit
Court of appeals in New Orleans
later today to try to secure bond
for Leary on the prison sentence.
Leary was sentenced without
bond by U.S. District Court Judge
Ben. C. Connally, who called him

a "menace to the country" who
"openly advocated violation of the
law."
Leary, 50, dressed in a tan suit
and open-collar blue shirt, receiv-.
ed the sentence without expres-
sion. His 34-year-old wife, R o s e-
mary, then kissed him during a
long embrace.- Leary, known as a
"high priest of pot," was formerly
a Harvard instructor.
He was convicted Jan. 20 in
Laredo on the smuggling charges.
He was being held without bond at
Santa Ana after a Feb. 19 con-
viction on possession of mari-
juana.

Leary was first convicted in
Laredo of failing to declare the
marijuana for federal tax pur-
poses, but the U.S. Supreme Court
struck down the law under+ which
be was arrested.
A retrial on the smuggling
charge followed.
Leary has been arrested at least
14 times in the past five years on
drug charges. The only convictions
have been in Texas and, Cali-
fornia.
He could have drawn a sentence
of up to 30 years in prison and
$20,000 fine.

photo by RICHARD LEE

March 10-14 1910
Lydia Mendelssohn
Thpadrip

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
THE GREAT DICTATOR

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