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March 01, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Are All Ed School
Students Apathetic ?
If not, prove it by coming to a meeting on one of the
most important issues of our time-the Environmen-
tal Crisis. Help plan Ed School's role in the ENACT
Teach-in.
SUN., MARCH 1 at 7:30 Room 3534 S.A.B.
or call Susan Allan, 761 -6557

Venceremos veteran lauds Cuban societ

By CARLA RAPOPORT
"I was politically confused and decided
to do something which would settle my
commitment,"- explains Deb Dunfield, a
participant in the recently-returned first
Venceremos Brigade to Cuba.
Looking more like a student teacher than
a sugar cane picker, Miss Dunfield en-
thusiastically described her experiences to
some 30 students at Alice Lloyd Hall last
week.
The idea for the brigade, Miss Dunfield
explains, came from an SDS group which
had visited Cuba and decided that Amer-
ican youths should learn more about the
Cuban revolutionary situation.
With advice from lawyers, the SDS
group planned for the Venceremos ("we
will conquer") Brigade to fly to Mexico

City where its members would receive
visas from the Cuban government and be
flown directly to Havanna.
"The blockade to Cuba has now been
successfuly broken," Miss Dunfield hastens
to point out.
Outside of the plane fare to Mexico City,
the entire trip was paid for by the Cuban
government. The group spent a total of
eight weeks in Cuba-six weeks cutting
sugar cane and two weeks touring the
country.
Leaning forward on her chair, Miss
Dunfield animatedly descries the favor-
able changes she feels has taken place
in Cuba since Fidel Castro rode the crest
of revolution to power on New Year's Day
1959.
"The image of the Cuban was pretty

low before the revolution. Some 20 per cer
of the population was employed, a:
women were only able to get slave-tyr
jobs. It was a totally oppressed nation
says Miss Dunfield.
"Now," she continues, "everyone wor]
and there is a surplus of jobs due to t:
diversifying economy. The country is sti
in a revolution, it won't let itself slo
down."
In her two weeks of travel throughot
the country, Miss Dunfield was able!
take a close look at the newCuban societ;
"The Cuban's are building a futurist
society, not a crisis-oriented one," she e)
plains. "Each. Cuban I talked to seemed1
be an enthusiastic, energetic part of built
ing of that society."
"Students in Cuba," she continue

"don't understand the word competition.
They just don't have the American drive
for more money or a better position. Rath-
er, they have a drive for increasing bene-
fits to mankind and in that way, increas-
ing the benefits to themselves."
"The younger generations don't have to
fight for their positions like they do here.
In Cuba, the college students work along-
side their elders with no friction." '
Miss Dunfield briefly explained the edu-
cational system in Cuba. "Everyone goes
to school in Cuba; schools are everywhere
and free. A child works through the var-
ious levels of schooling at his own rate.
At about 14, each student decides whether
to pursue an academic or technical ca-
reer."

Deb Dunfield

page thre

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

SATURDAY-MARCH 7-8:30 P.M.
Masonic Temple Aud., Detroit. Tickets now at Box Office
All Seats Reserved: $6.95, $5.95, $4.95, $3.95, $2.95

i

f , DIAL 1
5-6290 I
NewXak 0* Iy Newt I
44 113 11 W

Sunday, March 1, 1970
the

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

New Yok, Post
Newsweek,

..NwYork Tmes
A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
~~ ~
TODAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 p.m.

ne'ws to day
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Senate
aimed

nullifies amendments

to

ban school busing

Harry Palmer (Michael Caine) Double Feature
SATURDAY and SUNDAY MATINEES ONLY
'THE IPCRESS FILE' IS A TAUT, TINGLING FILM!"
-McCALL'S
A :unNRSA. TECHNICOLOR
p.ER TECHNISCOPE

ITALIAN PREMIER Mariano Rumor abandoned his attempt
to restore a national government.
Rumor, who resigned as premier Feb. 7 after heading the all-
Christian Democrat government for five months, was reappointed by
President Giuseppe Saragat and charged with forming a coalition
government.
The idea had been to form a coalition of center left parties. How-
ever, disagreements among the parties concerning legalization of
divorce and other matters prevented a successful coalition.
Saragat will now try to form some type of coalition. If he is
unable to work out an agreement between the political factions, he
may call for elections three years ahead of time.
* * *
LEO PANETTA, who last week resigned as head of the HEW
Office of Civil Rights, accused four White House aides of being
chief advocates of slow school desegregation.
The White House officials named by Panetta as being anti-
desegregation powers were: H. R. Haldeman, who regulates the
visitors and messages that reach the President; Bryce Harlow, coun-
selor and former chief of congressional relations; John Ehrlichman,
counsel and domestic policy chief; and Harry Dent, chief White
House political strategist.
Panetta also attributed the administration's request for a delay
in Mississippi school desegregation last fall to a threat by Sen. John
Stennis (D-Miss.) to withdraw as the Senate floor leader for Nixon's
Safeguard ABM system unless the delay was made.
* * *
GUATEMALA'S FOREIGN 'MINISTER was kidnapped by
terrorists who threatened to kill him unless the police release
a fellow leftist.
Four young men with machine guns intercepted Foreign Min-
ister Alberto Fuentes Mohr's chauffer-driven automobile Friday night,3
forced him into their car and drove away.
The terrorists, who claim to be members of the Reber Armed Forc-!
es, a para-military leftist group, later sent a message to government
officials saying they will kill Fuentes Mohr if the national police
do not release Jose Giron Calvillo, a leftist student, and turn him
over to the Mexican Embassy in Guatemala.
Police say they would be happy to release Giron Calvillo, but
claim they have no record of his arrest. The government is mean-
while making urgent pleas on Guatemala radio stations for any
information about the missing students.
TEACHERS IN KENTUCKY'S two largest school districts
were ordered to be in their classrooms Monday morning.
The order was an injunction issued by Circuit Judge Macualey
Smith against 6,000 teachers in Louisville and Jefferson counties.
Leaders of the Kentucky Education Association indicated the court
order would probably end the state-wide strike.
The strike had been called for higher pay and school-related
legislation.
FLORIDA FILED a $1 million damage suit against the owners
of a Danish freighter.
The freighter is accused of ramming an oil barge last Thursday
which spilled oil into the St. Johns River.
Asst. Atty. Gen. T. T. Turnbull filed the suit against Mercandia
International of Denmark, owners of the freighter Merc Buccaneer.
The state's suit included charges of improper operation after dark,
failure to keep proper lookout, violation of federal and state laws
governing navigation in the St. Johns and failure to observe proper

Anti-aircraft weapons
berry leaves from the
with instructions from

--Associated Press
Protecting the harvest
protect villagers in Nor th Vietnam as they carry their harvest of mul-
fields. Agricultural production is under pressure this year, in accordance
the North Vietnamese government.

WASHINGTON I M - The
S e n a t e yesterday overrode
Southern objections and nul-
lified two earlier House-ap-
proved amendments to a
health-education money bill
aimed at slowing school de-
segregation.
"There is going to be a reaction
to what occured here. There is go-
ing to be a backlash," declared
Sen. John McClellan (D-Ark.), in
an emotional speech as the Sen-
ate gutted the Southern-sponsor-
ed amendments on roll-call votes
of 42-32 and 41-34.
With the v o t e s, the Senate
adopted two amendments by Sen.
Charles Mathias (R-Md.), nullify-
ing two riders the House tacked
onto the $19-billion money bill
last week.
Both House amendments would
have barred use of federal funds
to force busing of school children
and would have endorsed "free-
dom - of - choice" desegregation
plans.
The Mathias amendments ad-
ded the words "except as required
by the Constitution," to the other
two amendments.
Although President Nixonmhas
said in the past he opposes most
busing as a tool of desegregation,
Sen. Clifford P. Case, (R-N.J.)
told the Senate "the President of
the United States strongly favors"
the Mathias amendment.
Current interpretation of the
Constitution rests on a series of
Supreme Court cases, going back
to the famous 1954 Warren court
ruling that demanded school dese-
gregationand ended the separate
but equal doctrine.
The Court has ruled unconstitu-
tional freedom of choice plans that
do not result in the active pro-
motion of desegregration, but.
serve to prolong the operation of
dual systems.
Since the Court has not ruled
that busing is an unconstitutional
means of enforcing desegregation,
the Mathias amendments effec-
tively nullify the earlier ban on
federal subsidy of busing efforts.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.,' Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

RECOGNITION POSSIBLE:
Rome, TU start negotiations

IF F-#T F~~-~oruM

lcpress-1 2:45 only

ADULTS $1.50 Funeral-2:3C
CH I LDREN-75c
NOT CONTINUOUS WITH "I AM CURIOUS"

j only

wmmwmmmmwmw

TWO SHOWS TONIGHT.

By BOB SCHREINER
The Ann Arbor Tenants
Union (AATU) disclosed yester-
day that landlord Louis Rome
agreed two weeks ago to recog-
nize it as a legitimate bargain-
ing agent if a Tenants Union
lawyer could draw up an ac-
ceptable recognition statement.
The agreement between Rome
and the AATU was made at a
meeting two weeks ago.
Rome was unavailable for
comment last night.
The AATU had picketed
Rome's Lansing office in Janu-
ary to protest living conditions
in his Ann Arbor apartments.
Rome is the executive director
of the State Crime Commis-
sion.
One question set by Rome was
that all press releases have the
approval of both sides.

Until now there have been
no press releases. But Lynn
Hallen, union press spokesman,
says that the AATU will no
longer abide by the agreement.
"We figured Rome was going
along with us just to keep us
quiet," Miss Hallen said. "He's
obviously trying to cool us off."
"Rome is using very poor
ethics," she continued. "He's
stalling like mad on the recog-
nition agreement. I don't think
he ever had any intention of
signing."
"He just hoped he could shut
us up, but he should know it's
going to take more than this,"
she said. '
The AATU claims that dur-
ing the two-week period, Rome
has harassed several of" his
tenants who have been strik-
ing. For example, it says he

phoned the parents of one girl
and threatened to make trouble
for the parents if their daughter
continued to withhold rent.'
"We'd like people to know his
tactics," said Miss Hallen. "The
houses Rome is responsible for
are still in terrible condition. He
has done virtually nothing to
improve their condition."
Miss Hallen says the union is
"giving Rome until Wednesday
to sign the recognition agree-
ment."
"If he hasn't signed by then
we will take appropriate action
on a large scale," she said. "This
action will .deal directly with
Rome's public vulnerability."
"We have to use different
tactics for each individual case,"
she continued. "For Rome, this
means attacking his public
image."

... The hip off-Broadway hit that knocks
the box and other American fetishes.
Groove Tube is underground television. It's
what TV could be without censors and
sponsors.
See a TV sex olympics ... a kiddies show for
adults only ... and an anti-VD commercial
to end all public health messages.
Come prepared to laugh a lot ... and blush
a little...but come
" . a wicked and hilarious lampoon of TV pro-
grams"-Look
"Now TV executives are faced with the ultimate
weapon. Groove Tube demolishes television."-Play-
boy.
THIS PROGRAM IS RATED "X"
No persons under 18 will be admitted
Presented by KENNETH N. NEMEROVSKI
THURSDAY and SUNDAY: 7:30 and 9:15-$1.50

By order of the Washtenaw County Court the continued showing
of "I Am Curious (Yellow)" has been temporarily inioined. As
soon as court proceedings are favorably completed we will con-
tinue the showing of this film.
DOUBLE FEATURE-STARTS TODAY
"BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!"
--.Judith Crist, New York Magazine
-Wanda Hate, N.Y. Daily News
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
--N.Y. Post, Cue Magazine, Holiday, Detroit Free Press

"OH! WHAT

A.

LOVELY WAR"

4

i! Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 28 and 29
..
>: " :t~~x$::),,';t:;:} :i
.;2:$.":: }}i"){;":ii}." :;
. *. ..'ti' *;'; .:h+ :,' ". ;:- }::my, ..
'4"t:,JEAN:{:}LUC" GODARDt;4 (1963)i}: X'}

SATURDAY, MARCH 21
8:30 P.M.-FORD AUDITORIUM
CLANCY BROTHERS
"Minstrels of the Emerald Isles"
Tickets: $5.50, 4.50, 3.50, 2.50
Available at Ford Aud., all metropolitan Grinnell stores, J.L. Hud-
son stores, Wayne State Univ. ticket office. Mail orders, should
send self-addressed stamped envelope.

U,

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
-Michigan Daily - Newsday - Cue Magazine
--Holiday - Group W Radio - The Villager
"I strongly recommend "Medium Cool." Needless
to say this is an important film that dares to experi-
ment. It may very well be the most stimulating
cinematic experience you will have in a long time."
--Neal Gabler, THE MICHIGAN DAILY
6ntonde
age of innoence.,.
into the

eF T AmTE

NOW 2nd
BIG WEEK!
SHOWS AT:
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

- I..~...1U 5.: N

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