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February 27, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-27

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Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 27, 1970

Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, February 27, 1970

AM CURIOUS':
fudge enjoins movie

Conference

I

(Continued from Page 1)
e obscenity charges incorrect
hile penalizing him in the mean-
hile.
He also argued that the com-
aint was defective in that it did
ot meet the Supreme Court's
finition of obscenity. The Su-
eme Court requires that mate-
al have a dominant theme which
a whole appeals to purient,
ste, is of an offensive naturent
e community, and is utterly
ithout redeeming social value.
He said the complaint stated
at only parts of the film. and
t the film as a whole were ob-
ene.
Lastly, he pointed out the merits
the film, citing themes con-
rning civil rights, Zen Buddism,
e x u a 1 relationships, 'and the
owth and development of a
>ung girl.

1uildings
nashed at

He said the sexual scenes were
handled in a way that was sub-
ordinate to the themes of the film
and not of a purient nature. In
addition, he pointed out that the
film is being shown in major cities
all over the U.S. and refered to
the evaluations of several film
critics. He concluded by asking
that the case be summarily dis-
missed.
Delhey's comments were short.
He countered that neither the first
nor the fourteenth amendments
were applicable to cases concern-
ing pornography, that the com-
plaint was not defective according
to state statute, and that counsel
had therefore not shown cause.
Ellmann said the appeal con-
cerning the restraining order will
be filed next week. He hopes to
obtain from the judge an invali-
dating order which will be appli-
cable to other nearby Michigan
communities as well.
The some action was attempted
in Wayne County last month but
failed. There the officiating judge
ordered the city of Highland Park
not to issue an injunction but re-
fused to make the rule binding to
other areas.
Robert Goodrich, owner of the
Savoy theatre in Grand Rapids,
says he will show the film there
if it is ruled that it may be shown
in Ann Arbor. Goodrich had sched-
uled the film for showing last Oc-
tober, but shortly before it began
running was served with a sum-
mons notifying him he would be
subject to prosecution under the
state law.
He decided not to show the film
when the Wayne County Judge re-
fused to make the expanded re-
straining order prohibiting the in-
junctions. The Grand Rapids pro-
secutor has taken no further ac-
tion against the theater.
The Ann Arbor complaint was
first made by a private citizen to
Police Chef Walter Krasny. who
was told to refer it to the county
prosecutor's office according to
the procedure set by City Council
some months ago.
Ager said a trial will be set
within one day after the defense
files an answering statement to
the injunction order.

not open to
radicalis
(Continued from Page 1)
vitation had been withdrawn
Wednesday night.
Some members of Radical Col-
lege expressed a desire as early
as Tuesday to attend the confer-
ence in some capacity or other.
Negotiations between R o b e r t
Adams, Director and Professor of
International Business, and in-
terested college members con-
tinued on a verbal level through
Wednesday morning.
Wednesday afternoon Adams
sent Sahlins a letter inviting him
and Psychology Prof. Richard
Mann to attend the conference
as observers. The letter also said,
"If, after you have observed the
seminar, you have any comments
relevant and germane to the dis-
cussion you will be given an op-
portunity in the final discussion
period to make your comments.
This of course is predicated on the
assumption that the Seminar is
not disrupted."
. Mann and Sahlins sent a reply
in which they told Adams they
could not attend the whole semi-
nar. They said they had discussed
this withthim the previousdeven-
ing on the telephone and had
asked him then if he would allow
six other faculty andstaff mem-
bers to rotate two at a time in
periods when Mann and Sahlins
could not attend.
Further their replay said, "In
accord with the telephone con-
versation mentioned, we hope
that these members of the group
shall be acknowledged as attend-
ing on a scholarly basis, with the
privilege of posing questions 'of
clarification (without intending
interruption of the business of the
conference), as well as designating
one of their number to comment
during the final session in the
manner you describe."
However, Mann received a tele-
gram from Adams Wednesday
saying that "alternate representa-
tion suggested by you was never
agreed to by me and is entirely
unacceptable.", The invitation was
then withdrawn.

Curfew in Santa Barbara fails
to stop third night of violence

(Continued from Page 1) : example of what could happen to

called for swift action to end
"wanton lawlessness."
Students said reasons for the
trouble ranged from the Vietnam
war to high student rents, from
conviction of the Chicago 7 to
"rape of the environment," from
alleged police harassment to po-
litical repression.
Kunstler just a few hours ear-
lier had addressed a student rally.
He said he did not consider vio-
lence "a good tactic," but advised
students to fill the streets so they
could be seen. "To the streets,"
shouted some in the crowd.
He said the trial "was to set an

you if you become involved in the
social movement . . . If resistance
is not heeded, then it can lead to
revolution. I hope the government
is listening. Fill the streets so they
can see you . .. Power to t h e
people."
Some in the crowd raised
clenched fists a n d cried, "right
on."
The throng at Isla Vista, sev-
eral miles west of this scenic city
of 75,000, so outnumbered sheriff's
deputies that officers did not at-
tempt a confrontation at first.
An initial attempt at burning
a Bank of America branch, by

shoving a flaming barrel full of
gasoline-soaked paper through a Day Calendar
broken window, was frustrated by
several fraternity men who ex- Astronomy Colloquium: C. T: Bolt
"The Calibration of Spectral Classl
tinguished the blaze. A second try cation Criteria" P & A Colloq. R
succeeded, gutting the structure, 4:00 p.m.
Firemen, also outnumbered, took
deputies' advice and did not re- Placement 5cr nc
spond.
At 2 a.m., after a helicopter GENERAL DIVISION
warned the thinning crowd to dis- 3200 S.A.B.
perse, a force of 250 officers with Summer Intern Prog. in Washi
shields and batons swept the main Iton. D.C., sponsored by U of M. Po
street and the demonstration end- tions avail in Congressional offices a
agencies; interviews held at Placem
ed. Services today and Mar. 3, ask for M
Damon. No prior appts.
Thirty-five young persons were1 Late announcement of Interview:
arrested on a variety of charges, MARCH 11:
mostly for failure to disperse. Barton-Aschman Assoc., Inc., M
More than a score of police were and PhD in all degrees related to 1
treated for injuries, mostly from ban and Regional Planning, call 7
rocks thrown from rooftops. 1363 for appts.

on,
Lfi-
Irk.,
)ng-
osi-
and
lent
Ars.
d.A.
Ur-
63-

0

Assembly asks recruiting
forum, hits moratorium

Buffalo

(Continued from Page 1)
nesday. At least 11 persons were
injured and 16 arrested.
Wednesday's violence erupted as
university officials and black stu-
dent representatives met to dis-
cuss a dispute between b l a c k
basketball players and university
athletic officials.
The black players quit the squad
earlier this season, complaining'
that whites got preferential treat-
ment.
Officials said however, b l a c k
groups were not involved in the1
campus turmoil.
A short-lived student occupa-
tion by Syracuse University stu-
dents in Syracuse, N.Y., ended
peacefully yesterday after admin-
istration officials warned that ap-
propriate action would be taken
against protesters. About 50 stu-
dents had taken over the Student
Government Building to show sup-
port of the administration and to
protest a building takeover by
others a week ago.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27

(Continued from Page 1)
to the matter of a moratorium
and suspension of recruiting.
Engineering Prof. Maurice Sin-
nott was one of the most vocal
critics, as he questioned whether
SRC had explored all other pos-
sible means of discussion and
whether it had contacted all Uni-
versity units. Sinnott also referred
to statements by Graduate As-
sembly and others which opposed
a halt in recruiting.
"Has the committee looked at
this?" he asked repeatedly.
Prof. John Young of the engi-
neering placement office said he
wanted to see discussion on the
recruiting issue, but that a mora-
torium was "inappropriate and
premature." Referring to the re-
cent recruiter incident at the West
Engineering Bldg, Young said,
"We can do better than to provide
a field day for radicals to promote
more of the same."
Engineering school dean Gordon
VanWylen told Assembly, "We at
the engineering school are con-
vinced it is not necessary to have a
moratorium of classes and a su-
spension of recruiting. There are
other, more effective methods for
dealing with the problem."
VanWylen mentioned commit-

tees within the engineering school,
as well as a forum without suspen-
sion of classes and recruiting as
possible alternatives for discus-
sion.
Radical College member Barry
Bluestone, Grad., said that As-
sembly had "missed the point. It's
a question of priorities and many
of these priorities are wrong," he
said.,
"It seems that SRC has asked to
discuss where this university is in
1970 and where it is going to be
in 1980," Bluestone added.
In other business, Assembly
elected mathematics Prof. Wifred
Kaplan, engineering Prof. R a y-
mond Pearson and law Prof. Theo-
dore St. Antoine to University
Council, thednew campus-wide
governing body.
Assembly also selected a panel
of four from which Student Gov-
ernment Council will pick two to
serve on the Committee on Com-
munications. The four are English
Prof. Marvin Felheim, engineer-
ing Prof. Ralph Loomis, geology
Prof. Henry Pollack and business
administration Prof. Meyer Ryder.
Assembly will, in turn, select two
students from a panel presented to
it by SGC.

Sheriff James Webster said he
considered calling t h e National
Guard, and asked the FBI to in-
vestigate the possibility of invok-
ing the antiriot law against Kun-
stler on grounds of crossing state
lines to incite a riot. The situa-
tion "escalated after Kunstler's
speech," the sheriff said.

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
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ASK FOR THEM WHEN YOU WANT PIZZA"
FREE FAST DELIVERY RADIO DISPATCHED

*

I- ______________________________________________

cinema

Futz:
EDITOR'S NOTE: - The two
reviews of movies in today's
paper have already left the ;
Ann Arbor area. However, 1
they still have bearing on the
overall perspective of film.
By NEAL GABLER
First of all: F u t z is
dreadfully bad. On s e c o n d
thought it is worse than that.
Bad usually connotes boredom
or embarrassment, but Futz is
downright disgusting. I seldom
consider leaving a theater in the
middle of a feature; this time
I was sorely tempted.f
It is so weak in so many
places that trying to catalogue 1
its problems is like trying to list
what's wrong with the Nixon
Administration. Where can I
begin? I guess the worst thing
is director Tom O'Horgan's con-

A merely intolerable flick

fusion about what a movie is.
Sure, Futz is projected on a
screen, but film is more than
technology; it is a distinctive
way of approaching material.
When the La Mama Troupe
speak a highly affected, and
what's more, unintelligble dia-
lect; when the camera wanders
about like an abandoned or-
phan; when the story spurts like
water from a faulty faucet
rather than flows-is the result
a movie? It is understandable
that this could be a success on
the stage where affected per-
formances are necessary to reach
the back row, where there is no
bother with camera positions
and where the story is neatly
divided into acts. But no one
ever took the trouble to adapt
it to the screen.
I get the impression that
O'Horgan, well known as a stage

innovator, wanted to carve him-
self the same niche in cinema.
He has failed miserably; his
divided loyalty to stage and
screen undermines the enter-
prise. In trying to merge the
"new" theater (which is ten
years behind cinema) with the
"new" cinema as he sees it
(which is ten years behind
where it is), he delivers a muta-
tion half-way between Marat-
Sade and Andy Warhol. Let's
face it. A performer clutching
his genitals may make it on off-
broadway, but in the movies it's
passe.
Structurally, Futz gives us
that old reliable of the avant
garde, a performance within a
performance. The Troupe ap-
pears on an outdoor stage be-
fore an audience. A chorus gives
a running commentary on the
action. Occasionally, they go "on
location" to recreate a scene
from the saga. The play they
perform concerns farmer Clyde
Futz. Clyde loves his livestock
but he goes Dr. Doolittle and St.
Francis one better - he has
sexual relations with his sow
Amanda. While I'm still a little

uncertain about the details
Futz's sodomy so unnerves one
man that the deranged fellow
goes off and commits murder.
The townsfolk are outraged.
Futz must be stopped. They stop
him.
There is a moral to this mad-
ness, especially timely, if not
especially profound, in light of
last week's activities in Chicago.
Personal liberty is dying. No
longer can a man do what he
pleases even if he doesn't harm
anyone else. That goes for
marching in Chicago as well as
screwing a pig, and believe me,
there is no pun intended. When
the sheriff in Futz says, "There
will be justice," we all know
what he means; Judge Hoffman
said the same thing.
It is a pity that a truthful
message cannot make a good
film., Futz isn't Intolerance; it
is merely intolerable. And yet
I believe that something might
have been salvaged . . . if they
had only known the difference
between a film and a stage play.
Anyway, even if you do go to see
it, my conscience is clear.

SPAGHETTI DINNER
SUNDAY, MARCH 1
2 p.m.-7 p.m.
ANN ARBOR
COMMUNITY CENTER
Adults $2.00, children $1.00
CLONLARA SCHOOL BENEFIT
(A Summerhill Theory School)

A deal iaMax'

By NEAL GABLER
Comedy usually relies either
on a witty script or a brilliant
characterization and, on rare
occasions, it gets both. Lamenta-
bly, recent American humor is
too unsubtle to succeed in either
category. Maybe it's our slap-
stick tradition, but our comedies
lack the cutting jibes of a sharp
script and the comic nuances
of a polished performance. As
a result, our comic films are
often amusing but seldom funny.
Viva Max is only par-
tially able to avoid the Amer-
ican pitfall. Novelist and play-
wright Elliot Baker has penned
a screenplay that is slightly
above situation comedy but far
below belly-laugh humor. It is
one of those "clever" ideas you
can almost hear k n o c k i n g
RoTAers
to*play here
The Roy Ayers Quartet will
be appearing at the Michigan
Union Ballroom Saturday, Feb-
uary 28, 1970 for a matinee
performance from 5 p.m. - 7
p.m. sponsored by the Black
Student's Union.'
Roy Ayers is a youngb1 a c k
j azz vibist who is making his
debut as a "leader" of his own
group currently playing at Bak-
ers' Keyboard Lounge in De-
troit until March 1, 1970.

around in the author's head as
you watch the film. "I've got it!
A group of Mexican soldiers,
under the leadership of a crazy
general, recapture the Alamo.
All sorts of international com-
plications. Why, it's another Dr.
Strangelove, almost."
Believe me, it isn't even an-
other The Russians Are Coming.
What it is, is a tour de force
for Peter Ustinov who milks
enough from the role of Gen-
eral Maximilian Rodrigues de
Santos to start his own dairy.
You don't need me to tell you
just how great Ustinov is. I flip-
ped when, in my youth, I saw
him bellowing "Tempestuous
Fire" as Nero in Quo Vadis?
Fantastic! Since then, I've seen
him cringe, whine, snivel and
twitch his petulant way through
Spartacus, Billy Budd, Topkapi
and many others.
This time, unfortunately, Us-
tinov has to carry the burden
alone. Viva Max is a film of
stereotypes, and it takes a cer-
tain knack to flesh them out and
make them funny. Ustinov is a
master of this art. Jonathan
Winters, in his brief role as a
National Guard general, also
carries on admirably. So does
John Astin, playing de 'Santos'
aide.
But when a stereotype fails, it
is a big enough bomb to escalate
the arms' race. A chief difficulty
here is that, with few exceptions,
the roles aren't particularly fun-
ny and neither are the perform-
ers. Pamela Tiffin, as a student

w4
Corporation
rol dynamic
nents. If you are
eer, physicist or

e're f inding plenty
of SPACE for our
products

IV

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ad stayi
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either one is ONLY $189
and includes

-1

*4

At Lord
we cont
environn
an engin

i

7

days and nights on

the beach at the Hotel
Acapulco.
A welcome in cocktail
party.
Moonlight cruise includ-
ing free parties, floor
shows, s a iIi ng, swim-
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7daysand nightsatthe
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Free services to beach-
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Scuba diving, snorkling,
fishing

chemist and have interest
in surface chemistry,
adhesive technology or
vibration/shock and noise
control systems we
want to see you. We
need professionals who
desire mobility and
diversification.

0

i
I
i

We will be on Campus
to talk about your career on:
MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1970
at the
CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT
TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1970
at the
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

i .l

--- I

M, iN

r

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