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February 27, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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page three

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SfrI[tiFian

D3atly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, February 27, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Laird

denies

U.S.

troops

used in
change

Laos, sees no

*U.S. policy

IlL

1I

71

presents
The Epic Jazz Quartet

Sat., Feb. 28-9:30

P.M.

HOURS: Mon.-Thurs.--1 1:00 A.M.-2 A.M.
Fri.-1 1:00 A.M.-3 A.M.
Sat.-7:30 P.M.-3'A.M.
Sun.-3.:00 P.M.-12 A.M.

GEORGE C. WALLACE announced he will seek another term
as governor of Alabama.
The former governor said his candidacy will force President
Nixon to make some concessions on school integration.
To become governor, Wallace must defeat at least four other
candidates in the May 5 Democratic primary and any who may oppose
him in November.
Albert Brewer, the current governor, is expected to be Wallace's
strongest opponent. When Wallace was governor from 1963-1967, he
chose Brewer for lieutenant governor in the 1966 election when Lurleen
Wallace's wife was elected governor.
After Mrs. Wallace died in 1968, Brewer became governor.
Wallace, third-party presidential candidate in 1968, insists he is
running only for governor, but added there will be no future for
President Nixon if he does not give the schools back to the people.
"Political action offers the only hope for doing this," he added.
* * *
AN UNITED MINE WORKERS OFFICIAL was indicted in
the slaying of UMW leader Joseph Yablonski.
A federal grand jury indicted Silous Huddleston, a' Tennessee
official of the union, on charges of conspiracy.
Huddleston was accused of interfering with the rights of a union
member by force or violence, obstruction of justice and conspiring to
interfere with the rights of a union member by force or violence.
Huddleston's daughter Annette Lucy Gilly is already under in-
dictment in the Yablonski slaying. Her husband, Paul Eugene Gilly
of Cleveland, also is charged in connection with the same offense.
Yablonski, his wife and daughter were slain last December 31,
although their bodies were not discovered until January 5.
PRESIDENT NIXON won a victory in the fight over the HEW
appropriations bill.
The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 15 to 7 to permit the
President to withhold two per cent of the funds in a new $19.4 billion
bill.

WASHINGTON (U) - Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
said yesterday American airpower but no ground forces are
being used in Laos to protect the U.S. position -in Vietnam.
In testimony before the House Defense Appropriations
subcommittee, Laird stressed "There has been no b a s i c
change of U.S. policy in Laos over the past three years."
"The President has made clear that the use of American
airpower in Laos is to protect U.S. forces in Vietnam," Laird
told newsmen. "We have no military forces engaged in ground

Informal Atmosphere, Good Food

combat in Laos."

E
I

Program Information 662-6264

HELD OVER
2nd
BIG WEEK!

SHOWS AT:
1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

-Associated Press
George Wallace rides again
Third-party presidential candidate and former Alabama governor
George C. Wallace announces he will seek the Democratic nomina-
tion for the governorship of Alabama on May 5. Four other candi-

xdates willopshi
Last month the President vetoed an HEW bill because he con-
sidered it inflationary. HEW Secretary Robert Finch said the newT
bill passed by the House is inflationary and he would ask the Presi- R EMA IN IN JAIL:
dent to veto it again.
Sen. Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash.) promised an effort will be "
made to delete the two per cent withholding authority when the bill Jlt l e IeS tr i s
comes up for: debate, probably next Monday.
Even if the Senate accepts the withholding authority, it must1
still be accepted by the House. Earlier the House gave Nixon the with-
holding authority, but this was deleted when the bill reached the of B lack P an th ers
floor.

While making no flat denial that
U.S. airpower is being used to
support Laotian allies, both Laird
and Chairman George H. Mahon
(D-Tex.) tied the airpower use in
Laos directly to the U.S. effort in
Vietnam.
"The bombing in Laos by U.S.
planes has been calculated to make
our position more secure," Mahon
said. "Its purpose is to defeat
efforts by the enemy to bring ad-
ditional supplies into the South."
Laird called the use of airpow-
er against North Vietnam's major
supply route, the Ho Chi Minh
Trail through Laos, vital to the
U.S. effort in Vietnam.
Bombing of enemy supplies on
the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos
by agreement with the Laotian
government began in 1964 under
former President Lyndon B. John-
son's administration.
Laird told Mahon's subcommit-
tee that North Vietnam has step-
ped up movement of massive sup-
plies into South Vietnam for what
U.S. military officials expect to
be hard but scattered enemy "tar-
get of opportunity" assaults in the
South.
Laird and Mahon talked to
newsmen briefly after Laird's ap-
pearance before a closed session of
the appropriations subcommittee.
Mahon told newsmen his sub-
committee also will study alleged
atrocities in Vietnam, including
some reported in the past several
days, but he said too much has
been made of the allegations.
"The subject of atrocities h a s
been overdone," Mahon said.
At the State Department, press
officer Carl Bartch told n e w s-
men the department considers U.S.
actions in Laos are in line with the
national commitments resolution
approved by the Senate last year
and a restriction written into the
defense appropriations act.

lit Laos
activity
WASHINGTON (IP) - With an
angry attack against the Ameri-
can r o1e in Laos, a bipartisan
group of senators has demanded
the administration disclose how
heavily the United States is in-
volved in the war-torn Asian na-
tion.
"The facts of our involvement
have been concealed from the
American people," Te nnessee
Democrat Albert Gore declared
during floor debate Wednesday.
The charge was also supported
by Sen. Charles H. Percy (R-Ill.)
A n o t h e r Republican, Sen.
Charles Mathias Jr. of Maryland;
said "Laos has become an arena
for the repetition of the mistakes
of our' Vietnamese involvement.
"I believe that the American
people - and the Congress - will
not ultimately accept a withdraw-
al policy from Vietnam that en-
tails merely a changing of uni-
forms and titles and re-engage-
ment in Laos."
The Maryland senator pointed
to "news reports from usually re-
liable publications" indicating
hundreds of former Green Berets
military advisers "swarming over
the country in numbers propor-
tionately larger than the Kennedy
administration commitment of
advisers" in Vietnam.
T h e debate, conducted before
only a handful of senators, came
against a backdrop of a strong
North Vietnamese force that has
moved quickly and wtih great suc-
cess against t h e Royal Laotian
army in spite of heavy bombings
by U.S. B52s.

Senators

re
pe
ar
H
th
m
m
eq

* * * NEW YORK 03P) - Legal experts that occurred in the recently con-
THE SUPREME COURT ordered all elected governmental w e i g h e d the constitutionality cluded Chicago 7 conspiracy to
bodies to follow the one-man one-vote rule. yesterday of State Supreme Court riot case. There Federal Judge
In a 5-3 decision, the Court said the fourteenth Amendment Justice John M. Murtagh's ban- Julius Hoffman waited until the
ishment of 13 Black Panthers from case went to the jury, then sen-
equires that each qualified voter be given an equal opportunity to his courtroom. Some felt the de- tenced all the defendants and their
articipate in elections. fendants, by disruptive conduct, lawyers to prison for contempt of
Governmental units affected by the decision include school boards had forfeited their right to a court.
nd all local governing bodies. speedy trial. The 13 Panthers were arrested
Chief Justice Warren E. Burger was one of the three dissenters. "I would read the speedy trial last April 2 on charges of con-
e concurred in a statement by Justice John M. Harlan that the requirement to mean a speedy and spiring to murder policemen and
ecision 'differed greatly from the scheme of government set up in orderly trial," said Bernard Bo- bomb police stations, railroad in-
tn ein, former presiding pudge of saltos eatetsoe n
ie Constitution. , m el ii0stallations, department stores and
In an earlier decision, the Court interpreted the 14th Amend- giving his approval to the action other property.
ent to require the election of congressmen, state legislators and Murtagh took Wednesday.
embers of the county governing boards from districts substantially Murtagh indefinitely recessed "
4ual in population. pretrial hearings in the caseL egislatu r
WELFARE REVISIONS proposed by President Nixon received They consistently had heckled the
tentative approval from a House Committee,.Heuco Wsystyndhclcourt since the hearings began -ro101a
ommittee has decided to approve the President's program. Final the recess would last until he had - I
ction is expected next week. their written promise to behave GRAND RAPIDS OP) - Gov.
GRAND RAPID__ - - GAv

to consider new
r reducing pollution

ABC PICTURES CORP. PRESENTS A PALOMAR PICTURE
SCREENPLAY BY MARTIN LAVUT ANoGEORGE BLOOMFIELD sroRr B DIANA GOULD
"WAITINGM eNILSSON ePooucw y EDGAR..SCHERICK QRECTED BY GEORGE BLOOMFIELD
BROACASTING COM CES, INC. I INERAMA RELEASING CORPORATION
i *

C
ac

The bill is expected to have little trouble in the House. Besides
Democrats who favor its principles, others have indicated they are
willing to give the administration an opportunity to try out the bill
although it may create budgetary problems.
The President's proposal calls for a subsistence income of $1660
for both those who are working and the jobless poor.

I

Ued HiFl Equipment
TAPE DECKS and RECORDERS
Concertone 990-AC-DC-165.00
Sony 560D-199.50
Craig 2404-85.00
Ampex 2150 Demo-275.00
Ampex 1100-150.00
Ampex 755 Walnut Case was-229.00
now 167.00
Tandberg 74B 199.50
Ampex Micro 88' Portable Cassette (stereo) was 179.00
Demo 145.00
Ampex 960 complete machine 250.00
Sony 255 95.00 r
Sony TC 800 90.00
Ampex 761 complete machine 250.00 Demo
RECEIVERS and TUNERS and AMPs.
Standard Tuner 54.95
Fisher 700 275.00
Fisher FM90B Tuner 40.00
2 Dyna MK III AMPS-60.00 each
SPEAKERS
1 pair Fisher XP-7 150.00
1 pair KLH 22's Demo 85.00
1 Altec Bolero 99.95
1 pair Aztec Monet Demo were 279.00
Great Rock Group Now 175.00 each
1 pair ADC 404 60.00
PORTABLE STEREO
2 K-1I's 125.00
1 Fisher 95.00

DICK CHUM
Teacher: BALKAN FOLK DANCES
BARBOUR GYM
Fri., February 27, 8-12-Elementary and Intermediate
Sat., February 28, 1:30-5-Intermediate and Advanced
Sat., February 28, 8-12-Review and Party
$1.00 per session, or $2.00 for all three

in the courtroom.
Lawyers for the Panthers spent"
the day conferring, to decide1
whether to counsel the defendants1
to pledge good conduct or whetherI
to challenge Murtagh's edict on1
constitutional grounds. Article Six
of the Bill of Rights says, "In all
criminal cases, the accused shall1
enjoy the right to a speedy and
public trial. .."
"They have a right to a speedyz
trial," agreed noted criminal law-
yer Edward Bennett Williams. "To
get it, all they have to do is be-I
have."
Courtroom disruption in theI
Panther 13 case paralleled to a1
marked degree the disturbances

William Milliken has been chal-
lenged to "stand up against the
polluters" by backing what one
Democratic senator calls "the,
boldest, most significant attack on
pollution anywhere in the nation."
The "attack" cited by Sen. San-
der Levin of Berkley involves a
legislative proposal that would
give any individual citizen the
right to take industrial or govern-
mental polluters to court.
Levin, an undeclared candidate
for his party's nomination to bat-
tle Milliken in the fall election,
made his comments at a public
hearing on the bill sponsored by
Rep. T. J. Anderson (D-South-
gate).

Levin and Sen. Gilbert Bursley
(R-Ann Arbor) ,introduced an
identical bill yesterday in the Sen-
ate, saying they hope to push the
question to the top of the Legis-
lature's priority list for the cur-
rent session
Milliken says industries and
government must stop pollution
through "increased dedication,"
Levin quoted. "But there is no
time for Sunday school lectures
anymore," the senator added.
"The threat of citizen lawsuits
will be more effective than any of
the governor's courteous pleas. We
must learn, and the courts must
be told, that you can't put a dollar
value on everything in this so-
ciety," Levin said.
"Michigan's precious lakes must
take precedence over profit and
loss sheets."
Levin accused the governor of

making proposals that "only pre-
tend to put citizens in the van-
guard against this desperate battle
against poison in our environ-
ment.
"The new bill has real guts,"
Levin declared. The time has
come, he added, "for governmenb
leaders to stop capitulating to any
part of society which is polluting
our environment."
The senator noted that several
organizations - including ENACT
from the University of Michigan,
the Michigan Jaycees, the United
Auto Workers union and several
conservation c u b s -- have an-
nounced their support of the An-
derson proposal.
At the same time, a group of
Detroit area legislators called for
a ban on virtuallyall "hard" pes-
ticides in agricultural fertilizers./

NOW
PLAYI NG

NATIONAL GENERAL. CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN TEATRES TIMES
FOH VILL GE MON-FRI
375 No. MAPLE RD.-.769-1300 7:10-9:05

I

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Tired of Being BURNED
By AA Prices?
So are we, and we're doing something
about it at:

DUSTIN HOFFMAN
MIA FARROW

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY with the support of the
MICHIGAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS, presents
THE ALVIN AILEY
AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE
Pease Auditorium - EMU, Ypsilanti, Michigan
MARCH 10, 12 -8 P.M.
General Admission-$2.00; Reserved-$3.00
Tickets available at EMU, McKenny Union; WSU Ticket Office;
J. L. Hudson Co.; Mail orders to University Activities Board, Mc-
Kenny Union, Ypsilanti, Michigan.

I

JOOHN AND MRY
kobEUCTB'' DIRNCio B SCREENPLAYBY BASEDON NTHENOVEL BY iSjrCBY,
BEN KADISH PETER YATES JOHN MORTIMER MERVYN JONES cuINCY JONES

The Second Floor

Panavision'
Color by Deluxe

516 E. William
(above Campus Bike & Toy)

I

IE

Four stores run FOR and BY the:
PEOPLE AND STUDENTS
including:

We

Need

You!

I

sIIr-E.rIpI!I

.. ..... i
r I
. ., ;
. .-.'/

II.

-! -- 1
,
_

I

II

I

41

Wild Flower
The Inexpensive Boutique.
DolIt
Handmade and Moroccan Goods

I

1.141111

U

for individual entertainment and group skits
we need:

presents
CHARLIE BUBBLES
Directed by ALBERT FINNEY

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