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February 24, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Il

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By NORM SCHERR
For the past thirteen years
swimming has been a way of life
for Gary Kinkead. Now the senior
star, captain and cornerstone of
his team, reflects on his carreer in
a somewhat wearied tone, noting,
"I'm happy that this is my last
year."
After three years of carrying a
heavy load on the varsity, the
burden has caught up with him.
"I'm retiring following the NC-
AA's. The pressure has been tough.
I've become a little sick of it."
With the graduation of Carl
Robie, Russ Kingery and Paul
Scheerer, soph Kinkead and team-
mate Juan Bello found themselves
filling some extraordinary large
shoes. They had an image to up-

hold, and they managed admirably there would have been a personal
well. ity conflict between us."

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CaenQ ;e P
AK I
A U ST IN

As juniors, they had becomeI
the backbone of the team. Their
versatility, Kinkead's chiefly in the
distance freestyle, the individual
medley and the backstroke, gave
Coach Gus Stager a variety of tac-
tical moves. Because they were
dependable and enduring, they
were called on repeatedly.
In his senior year, Kinkead can
look back on much of the same.
With his added duties as captain,
he feels that he's "only doing my
share for the team." Stager ad-
mires him as "a though man who
knows how to give and take."
Kinkead can trace his hard-
driving power to his early boyhood
swimming days. "During the Win-
ter, we used to practice in a 20-
yard YMCA pool in Indianapolis.
But in sumnwr, we would head out
to an old stone quarry and swim
back and forth along its half-
mile length. It gave you quite a
workout."
As a kid, the All-American-to-
be made his first splash at eight
and gained national notoriety by
nine in the 50-yard butterfly. At
ten and eleven he graduated to
national champ in the 100-meter
'fly and the 200-meter individual
medley.
But then the rising youngster
fell into a slump and remained
there for three years until his
family moved to Huntington and
he was introduced to YMCA coach
Glenn Hunmmer. Under Hummer's
excellent guidance, whose coach-
ing achievements' include Gary
Dilley, Olympic silver medal win-
ner in the 200-meter backstroke,
Kinkead's self-confidence was re-
stored.
Although he never swam in high
school (for lack of a pool there),
Kinkead received scholarship of-
fers from Michigan State, Purdue,
and Michigan. The Wolverine bid
came on the advice of Diving
Coach Dick Kimball, who spotted
him in a YMCA national cham-
pionship in Kalamazoo.
Asked why Indiana hadn't tend-
ered an offering for a home-grown
boy, Kinkead replied, "Coach Doc
Counsilman and I have knowr
each other for a long time. I th

At Michigan, he didn't meet
Stager until the first day of class-I
es, but he was already impressed
by the straightforward recruiting
of Kimball, "a fantastic coach,"
and the opportunity to work in
the shadow of the Robie-Kingery-
Scheerer gan.
In his frosh year Kinkead set
about the task of honing his pre-
cocious talent under Stager's crit-
ical eye, setting a prevailing record
in the 500-yard freestyle during
the Big Ten Freshman Champion-
ship meet.
His sophomore year provided
observers an inkling of even great-
er things to come. He took his
place among the veterans, per-
formed regularly well throughout
the dual meet season, and gainec
All-American status in the 200-
yard backstroke, the 500-yard
freestyle and the 400-yard in-
dividual medley at the NCAA's.
During the summer he tried ou
for the Olympics, but fell short.
"Although I swam okay in the
trials, I really felt down because
I didn't make the squad. I was
very disappointed."
But as a junior Kinkead re-
bounded and continued to be an
integral part of the squad. Stager
manipulated his blossoming talent
to the dictates of each meet's
strategy, entering him in two or
three crucial events a meet.
"Gary has a lot of spunk and
stamina," says Stager. "After
grinding out a thousand (yard
freestyle), he can bounce back and
swim a quick race in the i.m. (in-
dividual medley) or backstroke."
In last year's NCAA Finals,
Kinkead placed second in the 400-
yard individual medley and third
in the 200-yard backstroke to aid
his team in edging out Yale for
fourth ranking nationally.
As senior captain, Kinkead views
his actions as part of a personal
B.:Illboard
There will be no freshman
basketball game Saturday be-
fore the varsity contest. T h e
freshmen will instead p 1 a y
Thursday night at 7:30 against
Alpina Junior College.

end
commitment. "You have to be
there fighting with the team. You
can't just stand on the side and
order them around. You've got to
keep them up by your example,
your best effort all of time."
Stager sees Kinkead as "an ex-
ceptional leader who does things
in a quiet manner. Although he's
sometimes reticent, he gets things
done. He really shines through his
fine example."
As for a best performance so
far this season, Kinkead smiles,
"I wanted to make my final ap-
pearance with Michigan State
something special." Kinkead fin-
ished the meet a triple winner in
the 1000 and 500-yard freestyle
and the 200-yard individual med-
ley, a somewhat Spartan effort.
And futurue plans when he gives
up swimming? "I'd like to coach.
Some high school some place, for
a while. Then college, when I can
make it." The education major
certainly has had a fine group of
teachers. Hummer, "a coach's
coach," Ron Ballatore, Kinkead's
superb summer mentor on the
West Coast, Stager.
Any place in particular? "As
long as its warm." We agree.

Gary Kinkead

-Daily-Rob Roberts

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By RANDY PHILLIPS
If nothing else, the Wolverines
and Spartans had ample oppor-
tunity to practice their p o w e r
plays last weekend as the cross
state rivals managed 55 penalties
between them, three fights, and
two game suspensions. When the
referees weren't handing out two
minute minors or ten minute mis-
conduct penalties or disagreeing
among themselves, some ice hock-
ey was played with the results be-
ing a 6-3 victory by Michigan on
Friday and a lopsided romp by the
green and white of Michigan
State by the count of 7-1.
For the fifth straight time the
two teams came away from their
home ice with defeats. But this
weekend saw a slight deviation
from past performances. Michi-
gan completely dominated play,
whatever there was of it, in the
Friday contest at East Lansing as
they built up a 5-0 lead on route
to their ninth win in 19 confer-
ence games.

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A complete turn-about occurred
the following night in a some-
what more subdued meeting.
Michigan coach} Al Renfrew at-
tributed the reversal to the fact
that, "Michigan State just wanted
to win more." In all the earlier
match ups between the two clubs
neither team could get the upper
hand and breaks determined the
outcome.
Renfrew indicated that the
numerous infractions of the rules
were in part due to closer calling
of penalties by the officials and
in part due to the emotional as-
pect of the game. Emotions gen-
erally play an important part in
any Michigan - Michigan State
g a m e . Sophomore defenseman
Punch Cartier was suspended for
the third time this season after
an encounter with Spartan Bill
Watt Friday evening, as t h r e e
fights brought on most of the pen-
alties.
The Wolverines put on a fine'
display of passing for the Spar-
tan fans, but avoided any semb-
lance of a passing game like the
plague when they returned home.
In addition, the infamous, inef-
fective Wolverine power play was
consistently foiled. Renfrew re-
marked, "We were off in every
department . . . our defense was
weak, and we didn't hit anybody."
Cartier's a b s e n c e Saturday
didn't helpthings as the Michi-
gan defense was exceptionally
poor, and provided little protec-
tion for freshman goalie, Doug
Hastings. Hastings was pulled af-
ter the first period in which he

gave up four scores. Karl Bagnell
came in and gave the Wolverines
a lift with several superior saves,
especially one on a solo effort by
Michigan State's Don Thompson
just after Bagnell had entered the
game. Thompson scored 5~ times
in the contest.
But Michigan w a s frustrated
most of the time on Saturday -
even in the offensive department.
The Wolverines were in the Spar-
tan end of the ice for long per-
iods of time, but couldn't put the
puck in. Overall, the problem Sat-
urday was a lack of skating and
moving the puck in near the net.
Renfrew hasn't lost confidence
in either goalie, but he is not sure
whether he will continue to rotate
Hastings and Bagnell as he has
done in the past few series. The
Michigan mentor also plans to
work more on the power play des-
pite the fact that Michigan
"scores enough when we're even."
Although the Wolverines played
the worse game in many years ac-
cording to Renfrew, they came
away from the series without any
injuries. Even a healthy Wolverine
squad should be w a r y of this
week's journey to Denver to play
the second ranked team in the
conference. Denver swept Michi-
gan Tech 5-3 and 4-1 as they
have won 8 out of their last 9
games. A 'much improved Michi-
gan performance will be needed
to just stay in the same rink with
Denver. And Renfrew warns that
he may 'rest' some players ". . . if
they don't skate any better than
they have been."

4~
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Daily Classifieds Get Results

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F

February 24, 1970

DEAN WILBUR J. COHEN

4i

Your Attempt to Save the School of Education Has Been Dealt a Severe Blow By the Failure of the
Committee to Promote DR. DONALD J. BARR. His Credentials, Although Impec-

Executive

cable, Cannot Convey the Totality of His Contribution to a Vibrant Educational Atmosphere. Because of Your
Unremitting Record of Concern for Education, We Ask That You Personally Invite a Team of Impartial Evaluators

I

to Review This Unfortunate and Illogical Decision.

j

Respectfully Submitted,

CONCERNED STUDENTS AND FACULTY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

I

I I

CONTRIBUTIONS ARE WELCOME:

SAVE THE PROFESSORS
Qn i

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