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January 11, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-11

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WM9

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02 1

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meditation
as taught by
Maharishi
Mahesh
Yogi
Wednesday, Jan. 14
AU..-AH
8:00 P.M.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Pr ess Service

al rP

-mdL L
A63W 4&, 41P

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' _.a"-"announces
UNION-LEAGUE
FALL ORIENTATION
LEADER INTERVIEWS
Sign Up
starting Monday
UAC Offices
2nd Floor Union
INTERVIEWS JAN. 19-23

THE AMERICAN CONSERVATIVE UNION declared yester-
day that President Nixon's welfare proposals "are not deserving
of Republican support in Congress" because they do not match
GOP principles.
The generally Republican conservative organization said "liberal
ideologues" drafted the proposals Nixon sent to Congress, naming
in particular his urban affairs advisor Daniel P. Moynihan.
The ACU charged that the proposal would worsen welfare prob-
lems by making welfare "more comfortable" and "more respectable."
John L. Jones, executive director of the organization, vowed a fight
by the ACU.
BRITISH PRIME MINISTER HAROLD WILSON opened his
bid for five more years of power yesterday in a far-ranging speech
to the British people. He called on them to follow the Labor par-
ty's lead in the 1970's in solving the problems of racial justice,
industrial harmony, and pollution.
Wilson lauded the Labor government's social policies for creating
a social stability that is "the envy of some continental governments -
the Americans have not a hope in hell of domestic stability for many
years to come."
Speculation is that the prime minister may call an election early
this year, although his party's term of office runs until March 31,
1971.
* * *
GROUND FIGHTING SLACKENED yesterday among the
caves and boulders of the Black Virgin Mountain in Vietnam.
American forces, however, pressed their attack with bombs, ar-
tillery and rocket fire for the third straight day.
Field officers estimated earlier that 400 enemy soldiers were hid-
den in the caves and among large boulders on the mountain slopes.
After yesterday's operation, though, one officer said, "They're just
not there now."
About 18 miles northeast of the mountain American and South
Vietnamese troops claimed 41 North Vietnamese dead. American air
strikes, artillery and aerial rocket fire were called in after a clash
with a Northern force of undetermined size.
AN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLIGIST in Honolulu claims that
he has evidence South Korean troops shot Vietnamese civilians
at random. A. Terry Rambo, a student, says that he came across
the evidence while on a research project in 1966.
He said that he turned it over to the Defense Department the
next year but that nothing was ever done about it. The claim was de-
nied by a South Korean military leader.
"Scores of refugees told us the reason they had left their vil-
lages was because the Koreans were shooting them," Rambo said of
his research interviews. The interviewers, mostly Vietnamese stu-
dents, "got so angry they wanted to organize a protest demonstration
in Saigon to kick the Koreans out of their country."
* * *
FRANCE WILL USE the Libyan air bases the United States
and Britain must abandon this year Ito teach Libyan officers how
to fly the 50 Mirage jets their revolutionary government is buying,
informed sources said yesterday.
The informants said that France would effectively control
Wheelus base near Tripoly, presently American, through the presence
of its officers and ground technicians.
The sale of French jets drew sharp fire from Jerusalem, where
a spokesman charged that the arms would find their way to Egypt
"to complement the Soviet weapons they are receiving in order to
Prepare war against Israel."

page three
Sunday, January 1 1, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

-ssociated Press
Midnight in Moscow
Sen. Eugene McCarthy, center, chats with stage producer Uri Inbinov, right, and poet Andrei
Voznesensky at a theater in Taganka, Russia, yesterday. McCarthy also met with the acting head
of the North Vietnamese Embassy in Moscow yesterday to seek the release of names of American
prisoners of war being held by Hanoi. The senator, who has been in Moscow since Tuesday, said
nothing "conclusive" was reached at the meeting.
FIVE SOUTHERN STATES:

Nixonma
seek labor
law change
WASHINGTON (AP) - Secretary
of Labor George P. Schultz indi-
cates that President Nixon m a y
propose the first major labor law
changes in more than 20 years to
deal with strikes that threaten
harm to the nation.
Schultz, in an exclusive inter-
view, hinted Nixon may propose
that Congress junk the separate
Railway Labor Act covering rail-
roads and airlines and overhaul
the 1947 Taft-Hartly Act to cover
all big labor-management disputes.
There has been speculation
Nixon will propose strike law
changes in his State of the Union
message soon after Congress re-
turns on Jan. 19.
"That's certainly a distinct pos-
sibility," Schultz said, ,while em-
phasizing that the final decision
is the president's and still is un-
der consideration.
Such changes in labor law
would be extremely difficult to
enact into law. Similar proposals
have never gotten off the ground
before. Top spokesmen for b o t h
railroad industry and union op-
pose abolishing the Railway Lab-
or Act, and the White House re-
portedly has not cleared its pro-
posals with either labor or busi-
ness.
Schultz, preparing for another
try at settling the nationwide
railroad dispute before \it erupts
into a strike, said the 44 year-old
Railway Act, the nation's oldest
labor law, "has clearly misfired."
Schultz 'declined to discuss
proposed changes in the Taft-
Hartley Act, but other sources said
they might include more fact-
finding procedures and other
means of trying to achieve peace-
ful settlements. Nixon probably
will not ask for more strike re-
strictions beyond the 80-day cool-
ing off injunction now provided in
the law, these sources said.

1

it

at THE HOUSE

Supreme Court expected 'to
order further desegregation

1429 HILL ST.

.

SUNDAY,-JANUARY 11
2:00 P.M.-Organizational Meeting of
Jewish Activist League
Opening of Student Art Show
4:00 P.M.-Creative Service Committee
Meeting
4:30 P.M.--THE HOUSE PLAYERS-au-
dition for August Strindberg's "The
Father--come prepared
5:30 P.M.-First Deli of the new decade
corned beef and conversation for all !
TUESDAY, JANUARY 13
8:00 P.M.-MOADON-Israel Travelogu
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14

r
n
i

ie

Moadon-Meeting House
ISRAEL
SLAND OF4
DIVERSITY
TRAVELOGUE
MORDECHAI EIDELS
TEACHING FELLOW,
SPEECH DEPT.
Tues., Jan. 13, 8 P..
at The House-1429 Hill

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

WASHINGTON VP) - Resuming
a heavy schedule after a holiday
recess, the Supreme Court is ex-
pected to order Monday the im-
mediate desegregration of public
schools that serve 300,000 white
and black children in five South-
ern states.
The decision would again over-
ride the Nixon Administration's
advice that school officials be
given more time to endiracially
separate schools.
The justices' order is likely to
be terse and unanimous, bypass-
ing the hearings that usually pre-
cede such decisions. The court and
Justice Hugo L. Black already
have directed officials in the 14
districts to prepare for early dese-
gregation.
The districts are in Alabama,
Florida, Georiga, Louisiana and
Mississippi, ranging in size from
Mobile county, Ala., with about
73,500, down to Holly Springs,
Miss., with 2,743, and West Feli-
ciana parish, Lousiana, with 2,419
pupils.
The U.S. Circuit Court in New
Orleans ruled last month that

DAILY OFFICIAL
MONDAY, JANUARY 12
Day Calendar
Degree Recital: Peter DeWitt, organ;
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Chamber Arts Series: New York
Pro Musica : Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30
p.m.
General Notices
Representatives from the Law School
of the Univ. of Conn. will be on campus
Tuesday, Jan. 13 to discuss admission
policies and gen. information with in-
terested students. Appointsments
should be made by calling Mrs. Bennett,
764-0312, or at 1223 Angell Hall.
The Queen's University, Belfast, Ire-
land, again offers an exchange scholar-
ship for a Univ. of Michigan grad. It

HOUSE FORUM: The Self and the Non-
self - mysticism, drugs, and the
occult

desegregation of student bodies
could be delayed until next Sep-
tember. The administration sup-
ported' this ruling.
However, the administration
suggested the court set a fall dead-
line for more than the 300 dis-
tricts in the five states, and in
Texas, that are not yet committed
to desegregation plans. The 14
districts would be included.

The court could hold a hearing to
examine this suggestion but more
likely is a decision ordering im-
mediate desegregation along the
lines of the court's Oct. 29 ruling
in a Mississippi school case. The
court told 30 school districts then
that the time for "deliberate
speed" had passed and they had
to end their racially separate
schools "at once."

schools ''at once.~~ the law, these sources said.

t

will provide fees, board and lodging for
the academic yr. 1970-71. A $400 grant
will be made by the Grad. school to
partially defray travel cost. Studies may
be carried on in any academic discipline
offered at Queen's Univ. Info and ap-
plication forms at the graduate fel-
lowship office, 1014 Rackham. Dead-
line for receipt of applications is Jan-
uary 15, 1970.
Martha Cook Bldg. is receiving ap-
plications for fall '70. Present sopho-
mores n'iay apply. There will also be
limited space for present Freshman and
Juniors. Phone 769-3290 for appoint-
ment.
Placement Service
GENERALDIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Interviews at Gen. Division, call
763-1363 for appointments. Must make
appts. before 4 p.m. on day preceding
interview. A resume is presented to the
organization before, the interview, in-
quire about registering to establish a
resume with iPacement Services. All
organizations are pleased to speak with
young men regardless of pending mili-
tary obligations.
Interviews the week of January 19-
23: Check bulletin for qualifications
and further info.
Cit of Detroit
Illinois Bureau of the Budget
Metropolitan Life
Procter and Gamble, advertising
U.S. Marines Corps
U.S. Navy
C&O, E&O railroad
Hallmark Cards
Procter and Gamble, Sales
EDUCATION DIVISION
The fol;.wing schools will interview
prospective teachers in our office dur-
ing the weeks of Jan. 12, and Jan. 19,
1970. Additional info. concerning dates
and fields will be included in Place-
ment Bulletins and posted on campus
bulletin boards.

Lake Forest, Ill.
New York, N.Y.
Shaker Heights, Oh.
Toledo, Oh.
Northville, Mich., Wayne County
Child Dev. Center
Katonah, 1.Y.
Rochester, N.Y.
Washington, D.C.
Cleveland, Ohio, Orange Local S.D.
Miami, Fla., Dade County Schools
Mt. Morris, Mich.
Upper Marlboro, Md.
Otisville, Mich.
St. Clair Shores, Mich., Lakeshore
Flossmoor, Ill., No. 161
The test required ofrall teachers ap-
plying to N.Y. City for teaching posi-
tions in Elem., EarlyChildhood, a n d
Secondary English and math will be
given in our office between 3 and 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 15. Let us know if you
plan to take the test.
To make appointments for inter-
views with these schools contact Mrs.
Krieger, 764-7459.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Th a FREE University will soon be
in full swing. If you'd be interested in
teaching or coordinating a class sub-
mit a paragraph describing the course,
with your name, address, and tele-
phone no. to the WAC offices. Regis-
tration will take place Jan. 23-31st. For
information call Liz, 764-8865; or Dave
at 764-9727.
Bach Club Meeting, Wednesday, Jan.
14, 8 p.m., 1236 Wash. (at S. Forest
near So. Univ.). Speaker: Dr. Richard
Crawford "Bethoven's Broica S y n -
phony. Refreshments and fun after-
wards. All welcome (no mus. knowledge
needed). Trans. provided to and from.
John 769-2003; Larry, 665-6806; Kent,
761-7356, 761-0828, or 9.

Be a Counselor .

0.

;; j

CENTRAL -STUDENT JUDICIARY
Announces pen Petitioning
OpnGrads and Undergrads
for
THREE, SEATS
Sign up for interviews at SGC offices, ist floor, 1548 SAB
Petitions due Monday, January 19,5:00 P.M.

" IF you are in the School of Education or
working towards a Teaching Certificate
" IF you have an hour or more a week to
spend helping others
" IF you would like to meet some interest-
ing people and have a nice time while
you're at it
" IF you'd like a cup of coffee or a bottle-
soda (pop)
THEN, STOP BY THE
Educational Students' Advising Office
(Room 2009 U.H.S.) OR Call 763-3503
-THANKS

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