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February 22, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-22

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Tomorrow, Sunday, Feb. 22
Auditorium A--Angell Hall
1and 4 P.M. (note time changes)
The Mid-West
WORLD PREMIERE .. '
of
"TROPIC of CANCER"
Dir. JOSEPH STRICK
will be at the gala opening to discuss his film; censorship, casting, and other
salient cinematical issues
Tickets $1.50
available 1st Floor Union and at the door
Sponsored by Creative Arts Festival UAC

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NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

Sunday, February 22, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

1

A PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION yesterday recommended
elimination of the draft next year and the reinstatement of an
all-volunteer army.
The commission of educators, businessmen, and retired generals,
established by President Nixon last year, also recommended substan-
tial pay raises for first-term servicemen and junior officers. In addi-
tion, the commission called a drastic change in the enlistment system,
ending fixed terms of service and substituting open-end terms.
While the group did not recommend a specific size for the army,
it appeared to favor a long-term military force of about 2% million
men.
LAOTIAN TROOPS retreated from the strategic Plain of
Jars yesterday, leaving it in the hands of North Vietnamese troops,
while in Washington, Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-r
Mont.) urged the administration to permit publication of Senate
hearings on U.S. involvement in Laos.
Mansfield said the use in the battle of U.S. B-52s, which he cited
as "escalation," made it imperative that the hearing transcript be
made public.
Sen. Stuart Symington (D-Mo.) whose foreign relations subcom-
mittee held the hearings; failed again last week to win State Depart-
ment permission to publish the transcript.
More than 15,000 civilians were evacuated by airlift from the
Plain of Jars a few days before the communist offensive.
AN ADMINISTRATION-COMMISSIONED REPORT on ur-
ban education, completed last month sharply conflicts with cur-
rent government policy and recommends increased federal in-
vestment in inner city schools.
Rep. Jeffrey Cohelan (D-Calif.) has charged the report has been'
suppressed by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare be-
cause it contradicts President Nixon's budget recommendations for
education.
The' report urges the federal government to finance sharp re-
ductions in inner-city class sizes and set up small-group remedial
educational programs. It also recommends the development and ap-
plication of a master plan for urban education.
* * *
THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION'S Federal Judiciary
Committee yesterday reiterated their support of Judge G. Har-
rold Carswell's nomination to the Supreme Court.
All nine members of the group voted that Carswell is "quail-
fied" for the position, according to committee chairman Lawrence
E. Walsh. However, Walsh acknowledged that his committee has nev-
er rejected a Supreme Court nominee following an announcement of
the president's choice.
Carswell's nomination has been endorsed by the Senate Judiciary
Committee, 13-4, but faces a floor fight in the senate with 15 senators
publicly opposed to the choice.

-Associated Press
A PLAINCLOTHESMAN in, Chicago arrests A demonstrator in
front of the Cook County Jail.

/"ti 7

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Ufhicago I attor neys
file motion for bail

CHICAGO --Lawyers filed
a brief yesterday requesting
bail for the five men found
guilty of inciting rioting in
the Chicago 7 trial.
The brief, filed in U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals, also asks the
court to set appeal bond on the
contempt convictions handed down
by Judge Julius J. Hoffman
against all seven defendants and
the two defense attorneys.
In U.S. District Court Friday,
Judge Hoffman sentenced David

D AILY OFICIAL BULLETIN z
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g ., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. Fo0r more informa-
Day Calendar
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Music for a Quiet Sunday Afternoon:
Edgar Taylor, vocalist, Ballroom, Mich.,
Union, 3:00 p.m.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23
Phi Beta Kappa Annual Business
Meeting: 4233 Mason Hall, 4:15 p.m.
Geography Public Lecture: Dr. Don-
old Gray, Civil Engin., "The Influence
of Soils on Urbanization". Rackham
Amph., 8:00 p.m.

763-1363, or consult Interview Bulletin
for complete info., call early in week
to make appts.:
Week of March 2 and March 9:
Air Force Logistics Command
CNA Insurance
Market Opinion Research
Wickies Corp.
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance
Corp.
Defense Supply Agency.
Holt, Rinehart and Winston
Consolidated Freightways
Minnesota Fabrics
Detroit News
New York Life Ins.
Vista Team all week of March 9,
no appts. needed, headquarters
in Rm. 3529 SAB.
The following schools will interview
in our office week of March 2. It is
essential to make appts. early.
Pontiac, Mich.
Fairfield, Conn.
Maywood, Ill. (Proviso Twp.)
Rockford, Mich. .
Battle Creek, Mich.
Skokie, Ill. (Niles Township)
Lansing, Mich.
Kenosha, Wis.
Chicago,mIll.

Falls Church, Va.
Anchorage, Alaska
Oshkosh, Wis.
Orange, Calif.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Mt. Vernon, Ohio
St. Clair Shores, Mich.
Cambridge, Mass.
Detroit. Mich. (S. Redford)'
Winchester, Mass.
Greenwich, Conn.
Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Las Vegas, Nev.
El Monte, Calif.
Appointments, may be made by com-
ing to 3200 SAB, or by calling 764-
7459.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Dellinger, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry
Rubin, Thomas Hayden and Ren-
nie Davis to five years in prison
and fined them $5,000 each plus
court costs.
The judge denied them bond on
the riot convictions just as he had
denied bond on the contempt
charges last weekend.
The brief argues that in the riot
conviction there was "no basis for
refusing bail on the grounds that
the defendants were dangerous."
It states that-except in murder
cases-bond is a constitutional
right unless there is a risk that
the person might flee jurisdiction
or might be dangerous or an ap-
peal is "frivolous," meant only to
gain time.,
Meanwhile, in New York, Cor-
liss Lamont, chairman of the Na-
tional Emergency Civil Liberties
Committee, said yesterday that
vindictiveness was the basis of the
severe sentences and imposition of
costs by Judge Hoffman on the
five defendants convicted in the
trial of the Chicago 7.
"Hoffman's vindictiveness to-
wards the Chicago defendants is
shown," Lamont said in a state-
ment, "in his imposition of the
maximum penalties of five-year
prison terms . . .and especially in
imposing upon them the full cost
of the federal prosecution."
Dr. Edward G. Voss of the U-M
Herbarium will lead a botany sem-
inar at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday (Feb.
25) at the Botanical Gardens. He
will discuss the influences of the
Great Lakes on plants of the land.
Mary F. Willson of the Univer-
sity of Illinois zoology department
will give a special zoology lecture
at 4 p.m. Thursday (Feb. 26) in
room 231 of Angell Hall. She will
discuss the strategy of seed selec-
tion by inches.

25 protest
against
ROTC ball
Nearly 25 students picketed out-
side the ROTC Military Ball' last
night and early this morning,
demonstrating against the ROTC
program and taunting the ROTC
cadets as they left the ball with
their dates.
At 1 a.m., they were still picket-
ing peacefully. There was no vio-
lence and no arrests.
Chanting "officers give orders,
G.I.'s die," the group circled in
front of the entrance of the
hotel, under heavy police sur-
veillance.
Plainclothesmen swarmed in the
lobby of the hotel, while three of-
ficers stood at the front door. A
busload of policemen was waiting
nearby in case of emergency.
The demonstrators raised their
arms in satirie mimicry of soldiers,
mocking the cadets, and telling
their dates that the cadets they
were with were "killers."
The group had organized at the
SAB earlier in the evening, but
had postponed action until about
midnight.
Some bystander's taunted the
protesters in return, and made
derogatory comments about the
group.
The cadets were unappreciative
of the actions of the group. "I
think they're nuts," said one.
Radical
profs -form
group
(Continued from Page!)
the Assembly does not present
new views to the administration,
but merely reinforces the admin-
istration's stand. He claims Flenm-
ing and SACUA constitute "a sort
of mutual admiration society."
The Radical College is not of-
ficially recognized by the Uni-
versity as a faculty body, but Men-
del hopes it can exercise its vies
by influencing other groups. "Our
purpose is mainly to educate," he
says. "If the group gets to be of
sufficient size, it will have influ-
ence."
Mendel emphasizes that the' e
College is not,an organization of
graduate students. "We are a very
heavily tenured group," he says,
"and we can exert pressure on
SACUA."
Architecture Prof. Joseph Weh-
rer says Radical College will make
its views known through all avail-
able means. "We intend to do more
than just talk," he says. Mendel
agreed, saying he could see the
College take such action as picket-
ing.
The College plans to discuss pro-
posals for future action at a meet-
ing tonight.
Mendel says he hopes the Col-
lege will sponsor a petition to
censor Fleming which would be
circulated within the University
community.
Barry. Bluestone, an economics
teaching fellow says he will pro-
pose that the College "use all its
people to block the recruiter from
the Dow chemical company" who
will be on campus this week.,
Buestone says he would also
like to see the College take action
toward eliminating ROTC.

STORE-WIDE SALE-SUNDAY, MONDAY, AND TUESDAY_
Don't Miss Our "HAIR RAISING"
'. +V WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY

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SALE

SUNDAY THRU TUESDAY-FEB. 22, 23,24

MUSKET
ALL-CAMPUS
THEATRICAL COMPANY
Presents
The Exciting Musical Spectacle

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-------------- wwwwuwwu

MM Max. K iii

*a
GEORGE M'
MARCH 10-14, 1970
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Ticket Soles Begin Feb. 25:
Michigan Union
;"'"-...."""-..."....""....."..".......".....
* Mail To: MUSKET, Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104 I
E (Please enclose a self-addressed stomped envelope) E
E EI
E Name Phone E
Address
Date Price No. Tickets Amount E
Tuesday, March .10 8:30 p.m. $3.00 $_ _
Wednesday, March 11 8:30 p.m. $3.00__
E Thursday, March 12 8:30 p.m. $3.00 E

Including Columbia's New "GREATEST HITS" series.. .
The Best Known Works of Gershwin, Ravel, Bizet,
Mendelssohn, Wagner, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mozart, Grieg,
Bach, and others. As low as $3.59 During Sale.
-SALE PRICE- 6.98 List 5.98 List 4.98 List
IF YOU BUY 1-5 L.P.'s YOU PAY ONLY 4.89 Per L.P. 4.19 Per L.P. 3.49 Per L.P.
IF YOU BUY 6-10 L.P.'s. YOU PAY ONLY 4.54 Per L.P. 3.89 Per L.P. 3.24 Per L.P.
...:....- ri .. : n.. .. . A . V 1 ! D. . D 2.CD . a In 88 0Pa D

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