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February 21, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 21, 1970 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday. February 21 1970

"I, M-- VV I ..a /

I

music

in

himself

-poetry and prose
Bly to present readings, play

4.t

By BERT STRATTON
The Miles Davis Quintet is the tightest group In existence.
Last night they brought their explosive message to the State
of Michigan for the first time. The Hill Aud. did a commendable
job of keeping pace with Miles, although a few Neanderthals did
walk out during his set.
Miles may personally be one of the world's biggest bastards
(at least to white people like myself). But when the music starts,
that's all forgotten - his group is just so incredible; they're
energy packets, being unwrapped before your very eyes.
Miles group doesn't shuck. He told me that they play for keeps
every night - their hour and ten minutes jam last night is good
enough proof of that.
David led the way on the trip, one with very few signposts.
Only rarely did they pick a common line from Miles' repertoire
-such as the rock rhythm from "In A Silent Way". It was straight
improvisation for the most part, Miles calling the color of the
scales, as Chick Corea's electric piano added the fine shadings.
h The electric piano is just presently being explored for its cap-
abilities. Corea was the mad inventor, developing the "new im-
proved" sounds. Sometimes he sounded like a machine gun, at other
times like Tinker Bell. In all, he was superb, the latest discovery
of the Davis talent agency, the same firm that brought us John
Coltrane, Hank Mobley, and Tony Williams.
Indirectly, Tony Williams (Miles' ex-drummer) was represented
last night. The lead guitarist playing with Miles was John Mc-
Laughlin, who is a regular with Tony Williams' Lifetime. Mc-
Laughlin and Davis seem to be hitting it off well, McLaughlin is
on Miles' last record. Most of the time last night, McLaughlin was
fortifying Corea's rhythm, but he did manage to get one really
good lick in, covering the whole range on his guitar.
Jack DeJohnette's drumming knocked out just about every-
body ,especially those who came to the concert thinking Ginger
Baker is the world's best. DeJohnette is young; he can't capture
as many moods as Tony Williams, but he sure can swing (with
style). Wayne Shorter, on soprano and tenor sax, was at his best,
almost singing the lyrics to Miles' melody.
What Miles laid down was a barrage of sounds - blue, green,
and red ones. That's how they sounded to me. Back in the fifties,
the critics used to say that his trumpet sounded like "the voice
of the last man on earth." And Miles did, at times-when he went
into his unaccompanied, vibratoless solos. That's blue. The notes he
.!t out of the trumpet's middle register are green, blowing in the
breeze, the high screeches are blood red - the kind that make your
eyes squint.
The group walked off to a standing ovation. God, what a
load off everyones' minds. When they left, Hill began to surface
from the depths, minds were relaxing again.
Ron Carter's New York Jazz Sextet came on - the classical
lines of the grand piano and the bass, the dark suits of the musi-
cians, and the weird trumpeter looking like Henry (of the comic
strip) were almost too much to handle. But when they broke into
Thelonius Monk's "Straight No Chasin" or when Carter choked
Ravi Shankar-like incantations from his bass they were great.'
The replay can be seen tomorrow night when the funkiest sax-
-Daily-Thomas R. Copt ophonist in America, Cannonball Adderley, comes to Hill.
cinema
John and.;Mary': communication game

Following Writer - in Resi-
dence, Robert Bly's opening last
night, there are m a n y other
events and poetry readings to
take place in the near future.
This coming Tuesday (Feb.
24) Bly will read his transla-
tions of t h e Latin American
poet, Pablo Neruda, and take
part in a discussion following
the reading. This will take place
at 8 p.m. in Canterbury House.
"The N e w Brain Research:
the 3 Brains and Their Rela-
tionship to Poetry" will be the
topic of a lecture at 4 p.m. in
the Undergraduate Library Mul-
tipurpose room on Thursday the
26th.
The neat day, also in the li-
brary at 4, Bly will take part in
a symposium with Donald Hall
called "The New Poetry, or Why
the Spanish Poets Are Better
Than We Are."
Saturday evening at 8:30
p.m. in the Residential College,
a play by Bly will be presented,
called Why Do You Love Arms
So Much? What Draws You to
the Grave?
His second poetry reading will
take place in the Natural Sci-
ence Aud. at 8 p.m., March 1.
And to wind up the entire pro-
gram Bly will give a final lec-
ture on "The Return of the Old
Gods" at 4 p.m. in the library,
March 2.
In addition to these scheduled
events, Bly will make t h r e e
dorm appearances. Student ap-
pointments can be m a d edby
signing up at the book sale desk
and at the individual events.
These will be at 10-11:30 a.m.
on Feb. 23, 24, 26, 28, and March
2 at 1715 South University. An
informal class will be held on
these same dates at 5 p.m. in
Canterbury House. (Except for
Mar. 2 when the class will meet
at 8 p.m.)
All events and activities are
open to the public and are free
of charge.
Bly's books of poetry include
Silence in the Snowy Fields,
The Light Around the Body
(which won the National Book
Award for 1967) and The Morn-
ing Glory. The City Lights
Pocketd Poet Series is about to
bring out a long poem of his,
"The Teeth Mother Naked at
,Last."
k

-Daily-Dave Schindell

i II

NATINAL ENEAL CRPORTIO

NOW
PLAYING

FOX EASTERN THEATRESo
FOX VILL 6E
375 No. MAPLE PD.-"769.1300

TIMES
Mon.-Fri.
7:10 & 9:05

DUSTIN HOFFMAN'
MIA FARROW
JOHNND )MARY

I

Friday & Saturday
LORING
JAN ES
Is
BACK

SAT.-SUN
1:30-3:20-5:15
7:10-9:05

R

rH -_______

ili

By NEAL GABLER
Someone with a ;sense of
humor -must have booked John
and Mary out at the Fox Vil-
lage Theater right after Bob &
Carol & Ted & Alice. The titles,
say something about our so-
ciety. The discarding of sur-
names and the reliance primari-
ly on Bob, Carol, Ted, Alice,
John and Mary, underscores the
interchangeability of our lives.
Perhaps I am being overly ana-
lytical, but names once served
as elements in identity; now
they serve as convenient labels
in conversation.
Notice I said conversation and
not communication. There's a
big difference. Just about every-
one has become an expert at
conversation. But beneath the
punctilious rhetoric lies the
verbal sparring; each jab knock-
ing loose a particle of knowl-
edge, until, voila!, you have
broken through the words and
are able to communicate.
This dueling is just another
of the innumerable games peo-
ple play. It would be a hell of
AdvertisinL
To the Editor:
While not a scholastic parti-
cipant in the University's multi-
faceted nature, I am a partici-
pant in the various cultural.
aspects which art open to all
who wish to support them by
the payment of admission. I am
directing this not towards The
Daily, but the Inter Co-opera-
tive Council for primarily mis-
representing thru advertising
the recent Tim Buckley 'recital'.
The fact that Buckly himself
was disapointing (and given the
magnitude of the audience and
the endeavor itself, it's not real-
ly too surprising) is not the issue
here as the council had no con-
trol over the concert content.
Rather that the incredibly un-
original and dull group which
preceded Buckley was not an-
nounced previously to the public.
This group proceeded to com-
pletely exhaust any receptivity
which might have been better
spent concentrating on what

a lot easier if everyone just said
what he thought. But the prob-
ing is not totally without rea-
son. I know from my own ex-
perience the hesitancy one has
in adding an artificial input to
a relationship. You don't want
to say to a girl, "May I kiss
you?" Instead, a fellow waits
until the understanding between
him and the love-object is such
that the question has become
unnecessary. And then you kiss
her and, letting nature take its
course; you do whatever else
your passions dictate.
Other films have taken brief
looks at the pre-bed ritual, but
John and Mary is one of the
first that focuses solely on the
process. John meets Mary in a
New York bar, and they find
themselves the next morning in
John's bed. They don't know
anything about each other ex-
cept both saw Weekend at the
New York Film Festival. But
they want to feel that what they
did is somehow of, more con-
sequence than ,intercourse be-
tween alley-cats, so they set
honesty.??

out on the road to a meaning-
ful relationship. The bout be-
gins, only this time after they
have bedded down rather than
before; they test each other,
feel each other out and, via the
flashback, they dig into the
arsenal of past experience. Lo
and behold, in typical Hollywood
fashion, they find that they like
each other. Sweet mystery of
life, I've found you!
After reading so many un-
favorable reviews I was expect-
ing the worst and was happily
surprised at how intelligently
the subject is handled. While
the movie may not rank among
the greats, it is never boring or
embarrassing, and I thank di-
rector Peter Yates of Bullitt
fame for little favors. However,
there is one slight problem -
although the word battles are
intentionally low key, they seem
too much so, as if somebody
went beserk with a can of starch.

This may be due to the fact
that scenarist John Mortimer
had originally written it for a
London setting (also the back-
drop of Mervyn Jones' novel),
and the film has a subdued
British tone, not the raunchy
American flavor I have come
to know and love; all it needs
to be thoroughly Anglicized
is David Warner and Rita Tush-
ingham.
That certainly shouldn't
crimp your ability to empathize
with it, though. For one thing,
I am convinced that onyone who
doesn't look like Paul Newman
identifies with Dustin Hoffman.
He proves once again, by the
way, that he is as talented as
he is well-managed. And Mia
Farrow isn't any slouch either.
I advise you; overlook the mo-
ments of phony gloss and enjoy
it with someone you want to
love. It may save you a lot of
small talk.

SAVE $300
by making your
own decisions..
. and dinner
For Fall living, investigate
the possibilities at
OXFORD HOUSES
Open House Sun., Feb. 22
2-5 P.M.
(at the Max Kade House, across
from the "Arb")

Sunday-8;:30
JON
SUN DELL
farewell performance
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON STUDENTS
AND-THE TENANTS RIGHTS
MOVEMENT
FRIDAY, FEB. 20-SATURDAY, FEB .21
MICHIGAN UNION
WORKSHOP LEADERS WILL !NCLUDE HARLEM RENT STRIKE
LEADER, JESSE GRAY-NATIONAL TENANTS ORGANIZA-
TION DIRECTOR, TONY HENRY-ST. LOUIS RENT STRIKE
LEADER PLUS ED HARRIS AND OTHERS.

-1

'

.

___ .r

_,,

11

I

*1

@

NOW d1'

Undergrads and Grads
Tired of Studying?
Take a Break at
AN ALL-CAMPUS
MIXER
Sunday, Feb. 22 at 8 P.M.

I

TONIGHT! GO AND SEE

DIAL
8-6416

di

"F~ut is a shhrd.
ohust t, rote

Buckley was attempting to ruuntoTa un ur £he the
prove. Therefore, the point of MOTION PICTURE t ou nhat
this is that in future names secretIt
which are sponsored by the MORALITY! wherey you1429 HILL ST.
council, they should shave the out)"o
courtesy to the people, who sup- primte orliy 25c ADMISSION
port the name by buying tickets, Commonwealth United presents Play.
to notify them that the name in a Guvnor Proun ---- .- - --- - _ - - - - - - - - - - - -
question will be coupled with . .. . j ""~., AR
another performer. Those pay-
ing the admission price will be nNl
aware, that they may also be
supporting a worth-nothing en- CEW
tertainer and perhaps judge UNDER r''s POST
more intelligently whether or NOTADMITED!
not the price to see the reputable ....Feb. 21,22d Sunday
performer is worth supporting PAMAMAR.TORYROUPE .n m -. a. 22-Saturday,Sunday
the secondary entertainer in k JOSISTFMO - . .,ROCHE1EFOWENS - aTOMO OHGAH-,. CMORWEA THUNITED -"co
question. COMING: BUSBY BERKLEY FESTIVAL
-Michele SincockFETVLR LSOTHG lVI
dir. JEAN RENOIR (1939)
Tomorrow, Sunday, Feb. 22
Auditorium A -Angell Hall
1 and 4 P.M. (note time changes)
The Mid-West
WORLD PREMIERE
of
TROPIC of CANCER" :$o

I

I

The hip off-Broadway hit that knocks
the box and other American fetishes
Groove Tube is underground television. It's
what TV could be without censors and
sponsors.
See a TV sex olympics ... a kiddies show for
adults only ... and an anti-VD commercial
to end all public health messages.
Come prepared to laugh a lot ... and blush
a little :.. but come
". .. a wicked and hilarious lampoon of TV pro-
grams"-Look
"Now TV executives are faced with the ultimate
weapon. Groove Tube demolishes television. "-Play-
boy
Presented by KENNETH N. NEMEROYSKI
THURSDAY and SUNDAY: 7:30 and 9:15
SATURDAY: 8:00, 9:45 and 11:30
Prices: Thurs. & Sun.: $1.75; Sat. $2.50

The Best of the
Underground-Him
Artists
Brakhage, Anticipation
of the Night

I

I

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