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February 20, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Halfway Inn,
East Quad's Coffeehouse & Snackbar
Inexpensive Luncheons, Dinners, Snacks
CONTINUOUSLY OPEN STAGE-
ALL WELCOME TO PERFORM
or Just Come In and Jam
HOOTENANY Thurs., Feb. 19,9 P.M.-All Welcome!
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs.-1 1:00 A.M.-2 A.M.
Fri.-1 1 :00 A.M.-3 A.M.
Sat.-7:30 P.M.-3 A.M.
Sun.-3:00 P.M.-1 2 A.M.
Informal Atmosphere, Good Food

No

more

girdles!The era of the

rear

By AGATHA LUMPP
"My mother was the only one who
insisted we wear one," claims one comely
junior. "She always told us we shouldn't
shake around-it was too provocative."
But the young lady admits that when
she arrived at the University she gave up
girdles for good and decided she'd rather
be loose and comfortable than firm and
in pain.
The young lady is not alone, however.
Since the advent of panty hose on a broad
scale about three years ago, the old-time
girdles with garters have been dropping
like flies.
And in their place have come plain, ordi-
nary flesh and a new kind of "light con-
trol" girdle with no garters.
"I haven't worn one in at least three
years," says another slender coed. "I can't
stand them." And her graceful compatriot
says the last time she put a girdle on was
her senior year in high school.

There are some coeds who still wear
girdles, however. One says she put one on
last week "because my tights were baggy.
It was the first time in the three years,
though."
But another coed has a definite theory
about her girdle wearing. "There's an ele-
ment of self confidence in wearing a
girdle," she explains.
"I feel more comfortable with it on. I
know I don't enjoy seeing a bunch of flab
on 'someone else and though I know ap-
pearance is not all that important, I got
used to the idea of wearing a girdle when
my mother brought one home and told me
to use it."
Mrs. James Natalie, the assistant man-
ager of Jacobson's lingerie department
says that despite the new trend girdle sales
are good-"but in a different type of girdle.
Panty hose have taken over a lot," she
admits, "but we have new girdles with
only a little control and no garters."

There are three basic types of the new
girdle, Mrs. Natalie says-the almost-no
control for firm women; the medium con-
trol for a "nice mold" and the regular high
control "if you're a little heavy."
Men apparently like the girdleless look-
but for a variety of reasons.
One advocate of the no girdle look-a
PhD candidate in pharmacy-says he had
"a bad experience trying to pull off the
girdle of a young lady. We spent the whole
night trying to pull each others clothes
off," he explains.
Although one LSA junior claims he
"never really thought about girdles," he
admits he has "never preferred large rear-
ends. But there is a beauty iA the thighs,"
he says.
"I actually think a girl should wear a
girdle if it's necessary," he adds, "that is,
if she has a large rear."

11

NOW

DIAL
8-6416

"FUTZ" WILL SHAKE
T HEVERY
FOUNDATION OF
MOTION PICTURE
MORAITY!
Commonwealth united presents
a Guvnor Production ,

"Fut sea .er
A rude
thrust ow inZfto
the theatre.:.to
touchkvu n those
-Where live-
out your MU-f
Priate morty
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x
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NOTADMITED!

- - -

page three

im4e

43a' 1y

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

-n
Friday, February 20, }1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

k . 4e-

LUA R RTR OUE'.SwBEN SHAMRO w ALAN STROHm - o . f - .pv&= EON MREI
Swft.v0SEPH STEFANO " w o. w ROCHELLE OWENS . .ATU O'HORGAN . usawwCOMMONWEAU HUNTED -"COLOR
COMING: BUSBY BERKLEY FESTIVAL
Program Information 662-6264
NOW
i SHOWING!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

I
the
news today"
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
SAN FRANCISCO POLICE are fending and floodlighting
precinct stations after discovering a booby trap wired to a police-
man's car.
Special precautions against attack were already in effect at police
stations, when the Army grenade was found wired to a squad car in
nearby Vallejo. It was rigged to explode when the car moved.
Meanwhile, city flags flew at half staff as today's funeral services
were planned for Sgt. Brian McDonnel who died Wednesday ofj
wounds suffered when a clock bomb blasted a station Monday night.I
Gov. Ronald Reagan appealed yesterday to the U.S. Department
of Justice for a grand jury inquiry into any link between the bomb-
ings and a Berkeley rampage Monday, which followed a rally protest-
ing contempt of court sentences in the Chicago 7 trial.
THE SENATE passed a $35 billion federal education bill
attached to a rider requiring the government to move against
Northern segregated schools.
The authorization measure would extend major educational pro-
grams, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, for
four additional years. Actual funds will be provided in later legis-
lation.
The bill is one of the largest ever to pass the Senate, going far
beyond President Nixon's recommendations.
The South won a major victory in the two weeks of debate on
the bill with the 56-36 adoption yesterday of an amendment providing
for uniform national application of school desegregation policies.
THE UNITED STATES dropped presentation of a formal
position paper at the Paris peace talks ┬░in an effort to move the
'North Vietnamese and Viet Cong into direct discussions of the
issues.
U.S. ambassador Phillip Habib yesterday said the change in
tactics is "a major effort to engage the other side in the kind of
discussions that will be meaningful and to the point."
The other three delegations followed this practice also yesterday.
Usual procedure has involved presentation of a formal written state-
ment by each delegation. This was then given to the other side and
later handed out to the press.
The Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese scoffed at the new
American tactic. A Viet Cong spokesman said, "For two hours and
twenty minutes the American representative sought to elude the es-
sential questions our government had advanced. He endlessly repeat-
ed his absurd demands."
NATINAL CNERL COPORAION

-Associated Press
SYRACUSE STUI5ENTS occupy administration building to press demands for ROTC referendum.
Syracuse students taebidn

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (RP) - Fifty
students - including the student
government president and several
student body officials - occupied
Syracuse University's administra-
tion building for about 31/2 hours
yesterday to press demands for a
campus referendum on ROTC.
The seizure ended after Chan-
cellor John Corbally met with a
student delegation and agreed to
address a mass meeting of stu-
dents shortly afterward.
The main issue appeared to be
Corbally's decision to take t h e'
ROTC matter out of the hands of

the University Senate. The sen-
ate, composed of students, faculty
members and administrators, has
been considering the Army and
Air Force Reserve Officers Train-
ing Corps programs f o r several
years.
At a meeting Wednesday night
a senate committee recommended
that credit for ROTC courses be
dropped as of 1973 and that mili-
tary personnel teaching ┬░courses in
the programs lose their faculty
status at that time.
But Corbally rejected that idea

NOW
PLAYING

FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FO.MViLLaGE0
375 No. MAPLE PD. .769-1300

TIMES
Mon. -Fri.
7:10 & 9:05

ABC PICTURES CORP. PRESENTS A PALOMAR PICTURE
s~awmv e sMARTIN LAVUT AND GEORGE BLOOMFIELD umo esr DIANA GOULD
"ARNG'S*W,,NLSSONAOWergYEDGARJ. SCHERICK c cREM=8GEORGE BWOMFIELDMWW F
FEBRUARY 22, 1969-
the world's funniest general recaptures the
Alamo, and the world's mightiest army can't
get him out!

..I

I

DUSTIN HOFFMAN
MIA FARROW
'JOHIN AND MARY

IN THE YEAR OF

SAT.-SUN.
1:30-3:20-5:15
7:10-9:05

I

R

THE DOG, WHO WILL
FOLLOW THE WEASEL'
Inter-House Assembly and
Board of Governors,
elections

and said further consideration of
the problem by the senate would
not be productive. He s a i d he
would establish a university com-
mittee to consider the future of
the military programs.
Student government president
David Ifshin told newsmen yester-
day, "The main issue is simply the
chancellor's actions." I f s h i n
claimed Corbally had conducted
an official meeting arbitrarily and
"left me with the conclusion that
the senate was no more than a
toy for the administration to play,
with."
There has been no immediate
comment from Syracuse officials.
"We are demanding a campus-
wise referendum on the issue of
ROTC," Ifshin added. "We will
abide by the results. We are ask-
ing for a Democracy and we un-
derstand the consequences."
Eisenstein's
IVAN THE TERRIBLE
Part 1-Thurs., Feb. 19
Part Il-Fri., Feb. 20
7 & 9 P.M.
Multipurpose
Room
UGLI
75c Donation

Turn back
proposal
on busing
Senate re jects
amendment to
,cut court power
WASHINGTON (M) - The Sei-
ate yesterday turned back 49-3
a Southern proposal to cut off the
power of any federal c o u r t or
agency to order busing of school
children to change a school' rac-
ial composition.
The far-reaching amendment
was offered by Sen. Sam J. Ervin
Jr. (D-N.C.), who said it was the
way to stop the forced busing re-
sulting from desegregation orders
in a number of southern school
districts.
Opponents of the amendment
insisted it would amount to an
unprecedented decision to renove
the power of the courts to deal
with .admittedly unconstitutional
conditions in some school sys-
tems.
Sen.John S. Cooper (R-Ky.),
declared, "We ought to have
courts with the power to review
acts of the states of local officials,
of the Congress, and of the chief
executive himself."
Ervin however, shouted that the
South "is in the grip of judicial
tyranny" and asserted that any
measure was justified to break
this.
Several Southern senators said
they were far more interested in
the Ervin proposal than in the
amendment by Sen. John Stennis
(D-Miss.) on uniform national
school desegregation policy adopt-
ed Wednesday.
The anti-busing amendment
would deal directly with a prob-
lem now causing turmoil all over
the South, they said.
The Senate, in voting 58 to 36
for the Stennis amendment to the
multi-million dollar education bill,
gave the South it first big civil
rights victory in years.
But Senate Republican Leader
Hugh Scott said yesterdayt he
Stennis amendment is either un-
constitutional or unenforceable,
and will not become law.
Sen. Mike Mansfield, the Demo-
cratic leader who supported the
measure, said if it does remain
part of the massive aid to educa-
tion bill the courts will have to
decide what it means.
Scott s a i d it will be stricken
from the bill when House a n d
Senate conferees work out a com-
promise version.
"What its effect will be I don't
know," said Mansfield, "I would
expect that if it remains as, It
is, the courts will have to make
that decision.
"It either means let's not en-
foce any of the laws or lets en-
force all of them," Scott said. He
added that the first interpretation
is unconstitutional, the second
would be unenforceable. .."

I

=N,,

11

T
11

I

I,

TONIGHT

FEBRUARY 22-7 P.M.

Ili

I A

-./'
.'
.
.h
o - '>' a
<r
0
r
f
. r' "!

Jazz Festival ... Part I
miles davis
with: Ron Carter
and New York Jazz Sextet
8:30 P.M.-Hil Aud. Tickets: 1st floor Union
11 A.M.-4 P.M.

MICH IGAN
LEAGUE

I-/

SEE THE GOING THING

AT

I

THE OXFORD OPEN HOUSE

Feb. 19, 20-Thursday, Friday
METROPOLIS
dir. FRITZ LANG (1939)
Industry fights labor in Lang's expression-

6

h.

U

Sunday, February 22nd
2-4 P.M.

4911d , I

I

I

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I . t f v o A me rirn 1> f 1 LJtl ICE

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