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February 18, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 1$, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, February 18, 1970

Magazine implicates
McLain with bookie

SEES LESS RECRUITING

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Poor Denny McLain's troubles
worsen day by day. In an article
in yesterday's Detroit News, Pete
Waldmeir, News Sports Column-
ist, cited a story from the Febru-
ary 23 issue of Sports Illustrated
magazine that involved the star
Tiger pitcher in a bookmaking
operation in 1967. According to
t h e article Sports Illustrated
charges:
*"That the Detroit Tigers' 31-
game winner was a partner with
'a soft drink executive' in backing
bets taken by a handbook operat-
or identified as 'Jigs Gazell,'
whose headquarters, t h e maga-
zine alleges, was the Short Horn
Steak House in Flint.
*That Gazell's t r u e sponsors
were members of a 'Syrian mob
with Cosa Nostra connections.'
*That McLain and the:execu-
tive w e r e considered 'fish' and
were not told when the bookmak-
ing operation won, but were billed
regularly when it lost.
*That McLain and 'his execu-
tive friend' had been under 'heavy
pressure' in August and Septem-
ber of 1967 to 'make good on a
$46,000 loss suffered (by the Ga-
zell book) when a Battle Creek
plunger scored (won) heavily on
SPEEDY
Copy and
Duplicating Center
Typing-Printing
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601 E. William
(next to Mark's)
761-3596
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an allowance race at the Detroit
Race Course.'
*That 'at least one big Detroit
hoodlum' bet heavily on the Bos-
ton Red Sox in a game against
the Minnesota Twins on the final
day of the 1967 baseball season -
the same afternoon that Denny
was knocked out early in the Ti-
ger's season finale against t h e
California Angels."
The magazine article, written
by staff writer Mort Sharnik, al-
so made reference to a foot injury
which McLain incurred in mid-
September, 1967. Supposedly the
injury was caused Wih e n "Mc-
Lain's foot was stomped on by a
Cosa Nostra enforcer who had be-
come involved in ;collecting the
$46,000 debt." Also quoted from
the story were three different ver-
sions of t h e injury by McLain
himself - "stubbed toes injured
after he had fallen asleep watch-
ing television, toes injured while
chasing racoons that were raiding
his garbage can, and toes injured
when he angrily kicked a locker
after the Sept. 18 loss."
Waldmeir noted in his article
that last weekend the Genessee
County prosecutor's office had in-
formedca Detroit News reporter
that McLain and George (Jigs)
Gazelle were seen in each other's
company in the summer of 1967.

Pont puzzled
By The Associated Press "As far
AUSTIN, Tex. - Indiana football coach "there we
John Pont, who weathered a boycott by grievances.
black athletes last year, said yesterday some However
coaches are asking "Why inherit a prob- subtle raci
lem?" by recruiting Negroes. to it. Buti
"If I thought I would be burned" by an- cause of b
other boycott, "I wouldn't recruit any more ity, they c
black athletes," Pont told the annual NCAA mean som
seminar for newsmen.
But Pont quickly added that he had "no ASKED
negative feeling" about the black athletes problems i
who quit the Indiana squad last year and "Coaches2
may have cost the team a share of the Big are great
Ten championship. gram.' But
Pont, 42, former college star at Miami, a negative
Ohio, and coach at Yale, said he runs a bigger tha
"centralized democracy" or "democratic He said
dictatorship" at Indiana, "and it all rests ers lo o k
with me. I have to find out how everybody mends the
ticks and make the decisions." boycotted
cision whe
PONT WAS the discussion leader on the Asked i
"Coach-Athlete Relationship," and a lot of tants wer
the sports writers' questions were about the athletics,1
boycott, which may have knocked Indiana not a great
out of a chance at a 6-1 conference record.
The Hoosiers were 3-1 at the time of the PONT S
boycott. to today's
Pont said 14 Negroes walked off the team, volvement
but four of the nine players with eligibility letic, acadE
remaining soon returned and the other five He said
have since rejoined the squad. eration's "

as I'm concerned," Pont said,
as absolutely nothing to their
r, he said, "T h e y talked about
ism. I said there wasn't anything
in their mind there could be. Be-
lack pride and a greater sensitiv-
an take one word or one phrase to
ething other than is intended."
IF coaches were worrying about
nvolving black athletes, Pont said,
are starting to say, 'The problems
and could destroy my whole pro-
it I honestly hope it doesn't have
effect. I believe the coaches are
n this."
that. when black high school play-
around Indiana now he recom-
at they talk to the athletes who
the squad before making a de-
ther to accept a scholarship.
f he thought black power mili-
re "undermining" intercollegiate
Pont said, "To a degree, yes, but
t one.
AID there was a "new dimension"
college athlete and that is "in-
" in activities other than ath-
emic or social.
he did not like the younger gen-
I don't give a damn attitude." Al-

by black athletes

so, he said, "they are too uptight and can't
laugh at themselves."
"A coach can't tell an athlete he can't get
involved in outside activities," Pont said.
"The primary reason they are in college is
to get an education. and the second is to
play football. And they can't get involved
at the expense" of those purposes.
"But how far do you let a person go?
"If they want to grow their hair over
their shoulders after the football season, I
say let it go. I'm not going to talk to you,
but let it go.
"It's a sliding scale, but it's not a wishy-
washy one. There are six months when they
will be a football player like I think the5
should be, And for six months they can let
it go as long as it doesn't affect their edu-
cation.
"But I'm not to the point in my coaching
career where I'll let the athlete do exactly
what he wants to do. I believe in tradition.
We're going to treat them like adults, and
we expect themto act like it.
"I personally like - not a free thinker -
but a person who stands on his own two
feet."
Pont maintained a coach has to have the
final word.
"If you give an- inch today, an inch be-
comes a foot," he said. "They start chipping
away, and you have nothing left. I'd rather
say, 'do it.'"

RADICAL DEFENSE:
Established slam falls to fluke

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By LEE KIRK through the hallowed halls at 420 1
Daily Bridge Editor Maynard as the decks did their

I)

*Try Daily Classifieds

HARKEN CAMPUS LADIES
THE LAW CLUB
Requests Your Presence at
"An Olde Fashioned Ice Cream Mixer"
THURS.-FEB. 19 9-11:30 P.M.
LAW CLUB LOUNGE
Music by the Funky Turkey
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Card games are again becoming
an almost nightly diversion at
The Daily, with the bridge and
eight man heart games dragging
on far into the morning.
The decks in both games have
been cooperating, and some really
super hands have popped up late-
ly. One night last week, I g o t
three bridge hands with 8-4-1-0.
distribution, and many howls of
agony and delight have echoed
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for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
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32 Trips/Day

thing.
The distribution on this hand
was not as spectacular as most
on that particular night, but the
bidding was good, and the de-
fense was excellent.
NORTH
4-QJ3
r-K 8
*-KJ74
.te-Q653

4-9
V-9
+ -x

WEST

EAST

18742 4-10
7652 V-QJ10
X10 +-93
4-A J10 9874
SOUTH
^-AK6
V-A43
*-A 8 6 5 2
4-2
East-West vulnerable

suit with unfavorable vulnerabil-
ity was a trifle risky, so she pass-
ed.
Steve wisely refrained from
skipping and bid two spades, and
I then showed my diamond sup-
port. Steve finished the bidding
picture of his hand by bidding
three hearts.
After I bid four diamonds, Steve
could be sure that my trump sup-
port was substantial and that I
didn't have the ace of clubs. If I
had had the ace, I would have
bid four clubs. Since there was
nothing to be gained by going in-
to Blackwood, -Steve jumped
right to six diamonds.
The contract appears to be ice
cold, but Marty and Marcy's de-
fense was red hot. Marty, too, was
almost certain that I did not have
the ace of clubs, so he led his
singleton king. It would have been
very easy for Marcy to let the
king ride around, and if she had,
it would have been very easy for
Steve to make his slam.
However, Marcy saw that Steve
could have at most one club, and
it could not hurt to overtake the
king with the ace and return a
club in hopes that Steve might be
trump couped or somewhat con-
fused.
That's exactly what she d i d,
and Steve trumped her club re-
turn with the diamond eight. The
illustrious McLaughlin over-
trumped with the ten, and the
contract was set.
Steve can hardly anticipate
that Marcy has seven clubs, but
if he stops and thinks about it,
what other reason could there be
for her overtaking her partner's
king. If this is indeed the case, he
must, rise up with the ace of dia-
monds on the second' lead and
finesse Marty in trump, and when
this wins, he does make six.

AsheChastises S. Africa;
NFL to expand to 32 teams?
By The Associated Press
O SALISBURY, Md.-Arthur Ashe said yesterday he won't be
satisfied until South Africa is expulsed from Davis Cup competition
and the International Lawn Tennis Federation.
The American Negro tennis star, playing in the U.S. National w
Indoor Open in Salisbury, described as "an affront to my humanity,"
South Africa's refusal to grant him a visa.
Ashe's request for a visa, so he could play in the South African
Open, was denied because of what that government termed damaging
political statements by Ashe condemning the apartheid nation.
At the same time, South Africa said it would recognize Ashe as
a member of the U.S. Davis Cup team. S
Ashe said this meant South Africa would "accept me as a piece
of the American flag but not as an individual human being."
Ashe, a 26-year-old native of Richmond, Va., said his earlier
statements asking no reprisals against the South Africans was in-
tended for the benefit of the South African tennis players.
"It's not the fault of the players," he said. "The punishment
doesn't belong with them. I want the government punished. I'll keep
trying until South Africa is kicked out of the Davis Cup and the
ILTF."
" KANSAS CITY - The success of the National and American
Football League merger has encouraged pro football to envision ex-
pansion to 32 teams, including Mexico and Hawaii, Commissioner
Pete Rozelle said Monday night.
"If the merger had not come about," Rozelle said, "We would
have had teams fold, and we would have had a competitive imbalance.
Over 40 pro football teams had folded over the years until the 1960s."
Rozelle offered no timetable on possible future expansion, but
said he envisions 32 teams. "We may even have teams outside the
continental limits of the United States-such as in Mexico and
Hawaii. We have also looked at Canada, but we don't want to do
anything that would disrupt the pro football program, they already
have."
* * *
0 BOSTON - Gov. Francis W. Sargent says he is planning
further meetings in the next few days with principals involved in the
Boston stadium issue, but after initial conferences yesterday said
he is "cautiously optimistic."
Sargent met at the State House with John Warner, director of
the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Bill Veeck, president of Suffolk
Downs, and Billy Sullivan, president of the Boston Patriots.
The plan under consideration calls for the development by the
BRA of 57 acres of swampland in the Neponset section into a $16
million, 55,000-seat stadium. It would be financed, under Veeck pro-
posal, by the income from 12 additional days of racing at Suffolk.
The Patriots say they need a home by March 17 or will have to
leave Boston.

m

I

LAST WEEKEND IN CLEVELAND
AT SMC NATIONAL STUDENT ANTI-WAR CONFERENCE
30,=00 STUDENTS
called for
SPRI NG
ANTIWAR OFFENSIVE
APRI.L *13--lB8
WITH MASS DEMONSTRATIONS IN CITIES
ON APRIL 15
35% of the population over 21 now favor immediate withdrawal accord-
ing to latest Harris poll. This is an all time high. By April 15 it will be pos-
sible to mobilize millions of people FOR THE FIRST TIME to march in
every city in the nation
MASS MEETING TONIGHT

The bidding:
South West North East
1if Pass 24 Pass
24 Pass 3* Pass
3V Pass 4* Pass
6* Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead - King of Clubs
Steve Nissen, Daily City Editor,
opened the South hand with one
diamond, and SGC president Mar-
ty McLaughlin, sitting West, pass-
ed.
I was in the North seat, and I
had three possible bids. I could
have bid two diamonds, except we
weren't playing inverted minors,
so that bid was out. A two no-
trump bid was a little too space
consuming, so I bid two clubs, a
temporizing bid showing fair
values.
Marcy Abramson, Daily Asso-
ciate managing editor, decided
that bidding her seven card club

r--

OPENS TONIGHT . . .
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present
ESPERANZA
A Premiere Production by Susan J. Shaw
WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8:00 P.M.
Box Office, 668-6300

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RADICAL FILM SERIES
THE CONDEMNED
OF ALTONA
Based on the play by JEAN PAUL SATRE with
SOPHIA LOREN * ROBERT WAGNER e MAXI-
MILLIAN SCHELL a FREDERIC MARCH
Personifies the war guilt of Nazis in the family of a
Hamburg shipping tycoon.
a reminder that moral problems are real, irre-
ducible and vital even when they are insoluble."
-Heinz Lubasz, The New Leader
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 18

Have you applied to live in one of
the ICC Co-ops next Fall?
Are you considering living in one?

*

7-9:30-12

Admission 75 cents

CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynard
ARMedia

Then be sure to come to the

CO-OP MASS MEETING

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WEDNESDAY NIGHT
IS
STUDENT NIGHT
AT THE

SUNDAY, FEB. 22, 2:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM

7:30

Third floor of Union

Rooms R&S

Learn about student-owned housing on campus. The
Central Campus Co-ops will hold open houses for all
those interested in visiting them after the Mass Meeting

AMAD
INN
2800 JACKSON ROAD
Tl&T WUTh F-WIA .1 Tl TF1'

BUILD*THE SPRING OFFENSIVE
.. . .". _ t _ " + 1I I

AOOW*Akl

1 1 F-Inlecoc nn (O'"fral.

./""\.

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s 1 mouses on uenarac tam pus r AN

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