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February 15, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 1 5t 1970

Page Eig h tTHE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, February 15, 1970

Jury deliberates on
'Chicago 7'verdict

Lack of funds hampers
minority admissions

(Continued from Page 1)
Hoffman said the defense law-I
yers were "particularly reprehen-
sible," in not controlling their
clients. Both defendants and law-
yers "demonstrated a complete
lack of inhibition in bringing im-
proper matters to the attention of
the jury," he continued.
"Orderly processes must be fol
lowed," Hoffman said, "because:
the only alternative is anarchy."
Before sentencing each defend-
ant, the judge asked if he had any-
thing to say.
Dellinger, the first sentenced,
rose, his voice trembling, and told
the judge that the facts of the
case were not such as to "engour-
age false respect" for the court.
"You've tried to keep what you
call politics and I call the truth
out of this courtroom," Dellinger
said.
Hoffman ruled the defendant's
Eco loy
unit formed,
(Continued from Page 1)
ment was not an attempt to lure
people away from concern about
the Vietnam war.
"There would be no ENACT,
there would be no teach-in if we
thought it was something that
would take away from the war
issue," he explained. "I think col-
lege students can handle more
than one issue."
Calling ENACT a diverse group,
Scott warned the participants
against the dangers of political
in-fighting and fragmentation
that might occur in their organ-
izations.
Following short remarks by a
representative of the national
teach-in office, the conference
participants broke up into small"
groups to discuss the basic tech-
niques needed to organize a teach-
in.
Workshops included community
relations, action goals, organizing
the public schools, information
and publicity, finances, facilities
and program ideas.
"I think the conference proved
very beneficial to all of us," con-
cluded Manning. "There was a
tremendous exchange of ideas."

remarks improper and ordered the?
marshals to seat him when he re-'
fused to sit down. Dellinger con-
tinued to speak.
As the marshalls tried to quiet
him, Dellinger said, "I'm an old
man, but I'm not going to let you
stop me front speaking the truth."
Kunstler, openly sobbing, pushed
his way through the tumult to
the lectern and pleaded with the
judge to read his contempt cita-
tions next.
"You've destroyed me and every-
one else," he cried. "For _,God's
sake, send me to jail now and get
me out of here so I don't have to
watch anymore of this!"
Then he fell back to the defense
table, buried his head in his hands,
and wept.
After Davis' own sentencing, the
defendant attempted to put his
and the others' behavior "in the
general context of unfairness in
which this trial has proceded."
But when he began to outline
the treatment of Bobby Seale
(who was bound, gagged and ulti-
mately dropped from the trial and
sentenced to four years for con-
tempt last fall), the judge inter-
rupted him. "Do you know what
that man called me?" he asked
Davis.
"He called you a racist, a facist
and a pig," Davis replied.
"Many times," said the judge.
"Many times," Davis agreed,
"but not enough."
Hayden was the only defendant
sentenced yesterday who was al-
lowed to finish what he had to
say. He tried to explain why he
had done the things the judge
considered contemptuous, stress-
ing in particular his "horror" over
the government's successful ef-
forts to prevent former Atty. Gen.
Ramsey Clark to testify.'
Hayden said that "trying people
for political or idealogical crimes"
is "what brings politics into the
courtroom."
"The people who want to pun-
ish us," Hayden went on, "are
probably wondering why the pun-
ishment doesn't seem to work. As
soon as the elder Dellinger is led
out, a younger Dellinger comes
forward."
In closing, Hayden said he had
been trying to figure out what it
was he regretted about his forth-
coming imprisonment.
"It was," he said in a low voice,
"that I would like to have a
child."

(Continued from Page 1) i
able," says English Prof. Hubert
English. "Special services have the
danger of falling into this."
"The colleges have joined in
with the recruiting, but not to a
significant point," says George
Goodnan, assistant director of ad-
missions, who carries most of
the load himself, with thehelp of
the Black Student Union vol-
unteers..
Plans are being made' to ex
pand the recruiting office, but the
extent of this expansion will de-
pend once again on availability of
funds.
Goodman's situation is repre-
sentative of all University efforts
to increase the number of minor-
ity students. The program's elas-
ticity will be proven only if force
is applied - more funds and
more staff.
The students feel the present
programs are good but limited in
size. "It's not a question of qual-
ity or effectiveness of present serv-

ices," says BSU member Darryl
Gorman. "The University j u s t
hasn't seen fit to hire more peo-
ple when more people are need-
ed.
They are also critical of the
University for not consulting their
needs. "The students present their
demands, and then the adminis-
trators decide something should be
done so they rush around and
come up with a program, and
they're the ones who come up with
the answer," says grad student
Richard Garland.
"How in the world can the #d-
ministration figure out what to
do without really consulting with
the students?" he asks.
The administration disagrees.
"Our general procedure has been
to be informal and flexible," says
Spurr.
These disagreements could come
to a head at the Regents Feb. 19
meeting. Black students have in-
dicated they will bei on hand to
press their "escalating" drive for
increased black admissions.

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