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February 14, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-14

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 14, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 14, 1970

Candidates speak out on issues;
face primary election Monday

Councilmen LSA Ad board delays
seek swich 'vote on student narity

(Continued from Page 1) should try to be "constructive in-
lationship of city government to stead of destructive."
students is only part of the larger "They should take positive ac-
problem Ann Arbor faces-pro- tio nby helping minority groups
viding for all its citizens a liveable and poor people by providing help
environment. programs and work programs in-
"This involves increased per- stead of demonstrating," he says.
sonal liberties and better human "I believe important issues in
relations as well as the better use Ann Arbor to be an unworkable
of physical space and natural re- human right ordinance, an un-
sources," she says. - safe bus system, police restrictions,
Clark believes student groups obscenity and morality, use of tax-
Poli sei dept. in stalemate
over TF appropriations

payers money, and an underground
wiring ordinance," adds Clark.
Clark opposes the Model Cities
program and the housing ordin-
ance. "Model Cities," he says, "is
a buraucratic misuse of federal
funds," and the housing ordinance
"will raise apartment prices in
Ann Arbor."
Clark's opponent, C. W. Fer-
guson, maintains that "change is
being forced upon us through the
city's growth and we must act
with these changes, {such as couh-
cil has in the areas of housing
and the Model Cities program.
Ferguson does not believe the
police are "shakeled" now, but he
says, "I would not want to make
them ineffectual by a civilian re-
view board.
"Every person has the right to
engage in civil disobedience if he
feels his cause is justified," Fer-
guson continues. "He must realize,
however, he will suffer the con-
sequences until the law he is pro-
testing is repealed."

(Continued from Page 1)
The student charge that most
of the promised increase in funds
can be granted only for study in
specific areas and is not available
for financial support on a depart-
ment-Vide basis.
"Its posssible," admits Prof. Jack
L. Walker, Jr., a member of the
executive committee. "But with
more money and fewer students
next year that's 'not really a
danger," he says referring to the
departments decision to reduce the
admission of new graduate stu-
dents next year by approximately
50 per cent.
The course of the decision it-
self has also been a major point
of contention. Throughout the
troversy the, students have in-
sisted that the decision violated
the spirit of the Stokes Report on
decision-making issued by the de-
partment last year.
A position paper drawn up by
the ad hoc group last week stated
that "decision making process in-
visioned in the Stokes Report fea-
tures a dialogue between students
and faculty whenever their mutual
interests are at stake."
In spite of the fact that both
a graduate and undergraduate
representative sit on the depart-
ments executive committee, the
decision did not reach most of the
students until it was formally
.presented to them at a plenary
session of the department last
December.
Prof. Eldersveld s'aid the com-
mittee considers its decision to be
fully legitimate within the context
of. the Stokes Report and to be
"unrescindable."
"Regardless of whose fault it
was," said one irate student, "let's
do it over again but let's do it
together this time." ,
According to all sources, the
hiring of four assistant professors
will soon be a reality. By approv-
ing the decsion in the presence of
one graduate student, both faculty
members and students agree the
"letter" of the Stokes Report has
been followed. The decision also
already has four months of mo-
mentum behind it.

While the dialogue called for in
the Stokes Report may never have
existed as the graduate students
believe, it will probably take more
than invoking the "spirit" of the
report on the pert of the students
to gainthe consessions they be-
lieve they should get.

in parking
(Continued fropm Page 1)
At a meeting of the Ad Hoc
Committee For On-Street Park-
ing held Wednesday, a sugges-
tion was made to organize a
volunteer student group to take
inventory of the city's parking
signs, which would help defray
a large part of the changeover
cost.
Kazarinoff and Kirscht be-
lieve that "this burden on resi-
dents, both student and non-
student, outweighs, in our opin-
ion, the reasons for effecting no
storage of cars on Ann Arbor
streets.
In their proposal tney also
say that "the effect of these
regulations on the public is to
build resentment of city govern-
ment and contempt for the law.
Kazarinoff and Kirscht are
not the only ones irked by
"switch" parking.
Lottie Piltz, a graduate stu-
dent in the social work school
says she receives "about one or
two tickets a week" simply be-
cause she forgets to move her
car.
"If the legal side of the street
is full, I have to park several
blocks away," she says. "Its
frightening for a woman to be
forced to walk late at night,
especially in Ann Arbor."
Another student, who asked
not to be identified, reports get-
ting $170 worth of tickets for
violation of the switch parking
law.

l T \.J" TI/ \...+ V sar. Iti,,,/ / Yom. 1.ri. V . ..i 7V V' r1 7r *

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Continued from Page 1) But English Prof. Alan Howes
vant to the discussion. "We're not lisputed the student's entire idea
asking you to make agreements, 3f student government. "It seems
we're only asking you to recognize to me that ultimately the respon-
"he right of those individuals to #ibility for management of the
govern their own lives," said Mark University lies with the faculty,"
Rosenbaum '70. he said.
Still other students believed that Chemistry Prof. Adon Gordusk
:naking approval of the judiciary also disagreed with the entire
,ontingent upon approval of the trend toward student judiciaries.
form of the student government 'I object to the general concept
was unwarranted coercion to make >f imposing strict judicial struc-
uhe government conform to fac- Lure on the University, -which is
ulty specifications. iot a judicial body," he said. "The
"That's just a form of black- University has no judicial powers
m said Steve Nissen,'70. "As, s such-it has no police force, no

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'{
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,r i, OCUL u G .N~ J . a
ong as the government is repre-
5entative, what difference does it
make?"
But Cameron countered, "Oh I
Don't believe that is sufficient,
you're just using the word as
though it has .some magic spell."

jails and no extradition proce-
lures."
"It is much like a family," he
::ontinued, "a student can just
leave if he is in trouble with it.
Frankly, I like the present system,"
he said.

NED'S
BOOKSTORE
YPSILANTI
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.
10%% OfF
ON ALL BOOKS
Mon -Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.-12:5:30
We think we're interesting-
We hope you will.

d
I

49

VP Spurr: coordinating
Flint, Dearborn expansion

CIVIL ENGINEERING SENIORS!
YOUR FUTURE CAN BE IN TRANSPORTATION
Our expanding transportation engineering
program includes an annual 1/2 billion dollars in
highway construction
No Exam-Tuition refunds for Graduate Study
See our recruiter on THURS., FEB. 26, 1970. Visit your
Placement Office NOW for brochures and SIGN UP to hear
the full story, or write to:
Personnel Bureau
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
State Campus Building 5, Albany, New York 12226

(Continued from Page 1)
1956 as an upper-divisional col-'
lege to Flint Junior College, which
is not owned by the University.
In 1965, however, the Regents
approved expanding the senior
college to a four-year program,
and as a consequence, enrollment
growth has all but exceeded the
college's space.
Spurr believes that in approv-
ing expansion of Dearborn to a
four-year program, the Regents
laid the groundwork for a success-
ful revitalization of the campus.
"This will be a very large, and
prosperous campus ten years from
now," he predicts. "Dearborn is
the logical nucleus for a four-year
institution."
However, he is quick to point
out that fulfillment of the re-
gental objectives will require the
tacit approval of the state gov-
ernment in Lansing, which holds
the purse strings.
In his recent budget message to
the state Legislature, Gov. Wil-
liam Milliken did not include a
request for funds which would
permit Dearborn to begin hiring
faculty and securing facilities in
preparation for the admission of
a freshman class.
If the Legislature declines to
provide the funds, Spurr says, it
is unlikely that freshmen will be
admitted by fall, 1971, as now pro-
jected.
He cites as his major actions
the institution of a mechanism
which will handle the expansion

of graduate level programs at Flint
and Dearborn, and the initiation
of a process by which chancellors
for the two campuses will be se-
lected.
Currently, the Dearborn campus
and Flint College are supervised
by a dean directly responsible to
Vice President Smith for academic
matters.

Daily Classifieds Get Results

-.i

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The Regents approved selecting
chancellors to head the two cam-
puses in an effort to make them
more autonomous-as suggested
by the study committees last
spring.
APARTMENTS
SUITES
CO-OPS
Oxford Houses offer a real op-
portunity for student decision-
making . . . right down to what
to have for dinner. - Mainten-
ance, linens, and "Nite Owl
Bus" are provided.
Find out about Oxford at an
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Feb. 15, 2-5 P.M.
(free goodies)

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What career at RCA fits your talents?

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Sponsoring University Charter's 6th Annual Charter Series
ROUND TRIP JETS

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 1970 PROGRAM
DETROIT METRO DEPARTURES
To Depart Weeks Return Cost
London 2 May 4 5 June 9 $189
London 3 May 5 7 June 25 199
London 4 May 15 12 Aug. 20 219
London 5 June 21 10 Sept. 2 229
London 6 June 26 8 Aug. 26 229
London 10 July 5 8 Aug. 30 239
Paris May 6 7 June 23 169
Japan July 16 6 Aug. 31 419

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