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February 13, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-13

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Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 13, 1970

NOWHERE TO RUN:

MUSC FROM BIG PINK,"
a leed in its
oWn tie. s t

Critics have acclaimed
the second album,
THE BAND" asthE
"ALBUM OF THE YEAR."

"RAG MAMA RAG"
ik the new single
by popular demand.

O THE BAND playing THE MUSIC.
Capw-

VS

The squeeze

on IM

facilities

By BOB ANDREWS
Each year, the number of
people who take advantage of
the facilities and programs of
the Intramural Sports, expands
with great regularity, however,
it is unfortunate that the facili-
ties fail to do the same. There
are twelve divisions in the I-M
program with over fifty percent
of the male students - in addi-
tion to many members of the
faculty and staff - taking part
in at least one of the divisions.
Intramural Director, Rodney
Grambeau, realizes that ratio of
participants to facilities has
reached its saturation point.
For this reason, many students
who want to form teams aren't
able to because it would just
add to the overcrowding t h a t
already exists.
One clear example of this
fact is the situation that exists
in basketball. If one were to
venture down to the I-M build-
ing at about fouro'clock in the
afternoon, to shoot some bas-
kets, he would find the f o u r
courts completely jammed with
many other students standing
along the sidelines, waiting for
their chance to play. M a n y
students who want to start their
own teams in the competition
cannot.
COMPETITION GAMES go on
until late at night because there
are only four courts and so
many teams that have to play.
Grambeau feels that no man

will be deprived of participating
in the competition yet this year,
many were turned down because
of the lack of basketball courts.
Another major setback of the
building is the lack of lockers
for women so that they can
more often enjoy the activities
of I-M sports. Only a restrict-
ed number of fe~hales can par-
ticipate, except for Friday nights
which are co-recreational nights,
and reserved exclusively for that
purpose. Women usually have
to go to Barbour Gymnasium, a
structure built so long ago, that
it would be an understatement
to say that it was out of date.
The location of the I-M build-
ing deters many people f r o m
going out to play there. It is
fairly far away from most of
the dormitories and in incli-
mate weather, one would really
have to push himself to walk
way out there.
THE SOLUTION to this entire
problem is quite simple; the
addition of a modern and larger
building to take much of t h e
pressure off the original struc-
ture. Originally, it was hoped
that two new buildings would be
erected, one in the North Cam-
pus area and another one in the
Central Campus, but that was
a little too much to ask for at
one sitting.
Then it was proposed that just
one building be erected next to

Margaret Bell Pool, which would
put it easily accessible to many,
of the dorms. Grambeau said,
"the University has recently
realized the needs of the I-M
program and is making some ef-
fort to remedy the situation.
However, what the University is
doing is just a start and much
more will have to be done if
the conditions are to improve a
great deal."
When the new structure is
put up, Waterman and Bar-
bour Gymnasiums will be torn
down. Grambeau made it clear
however, that the space added
by the new I-M building w i11
more than compensate for the
area lost by the tearing down

of those ancient gymnasiums.
There would be many more bas-
ketball courts in the building
which would allow the number
of teams in each division to
increase. Also, there would be
a greater number of lockers for
women to use and hopefully
there could be co-recreational
night every night.
Grambeau feels that e v e r y
student should spend his free
time in some sort of physical ac-
tivity and he knows that the
only way this could be accomp-
lished is by providing more fa-
cilities which give the students
the opportunity to take part in
one or more of the wide range
of sports available.

A

This Weekend in Sports
TODAY
HOCKEY-at Wisconsin (8:00 p.m.-Radio WAAM)
GYMNASTICS-INDIANA STATE and SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
at Ihdiana State
TOMORROW
BASKETBALL-at Wisconsin (1:15 p.m.-TV-Ch. 4)
HOCKEY-at Wisconsin (8:00 p.m.-Radio WAAM)
WRESTLING-at Iowa
SWIMMING-at Illinois
GYMNASTICS-at Indiana
TRACK-MICHIGAN STATE RELAYS at East Lansing
ANTV ETL
$10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac 'V Rentals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

Vikings grab playoff gold;
Flyer goalie lost for year
By The Associated Press
" NEW YORK - The Minnesota Vikings will receive $7,929.77
for each full share for winning the National Football League title
from the Cleveland Browns.
In addition to the winning shares, the Vikings also received
$7,500 as the losing share from the Super Bowl in which they were
defeated by the Kansas City Chiefs.
Cleveland will receive $5,117.80 for each full loser's share from
the title game.
Dallas, Capitol Division winner and loser to Cleveland in the
Eastern Conference playoff voted 59 shares worth $847.46 each.
Los Angeles, Coastal Division winner and loser to Minnesota in
the Western Conference pliayoff, voted 55 shares worth $909.10 each.
PHILADELPHIA - Goalie Doug Favell of the Philadelphia
Flyers has been sidelined for the remainder of the national hockey
league season by a severed Achilles tendon suffered in a locker room
accident.
Dr. Hunter Neal repaired the tendon in Favell's left leg in emer-
gency surgery Wednesday. Dr. Neal called the operation a success.
Dr. Stanley Spout, the flyers' physician, said Favell's foot will
be in a cast for six weeks "and then there will be a period of
rehabilitation. There's no way he can play this season."
Favell was barefoot near the shower room of the Flyers club
house when he backed into a skate on the floor following an afternoon
workout. The tendon just above his left heel was cut two inches
deep.
*a KENT, Ohio - Coach Frank Truittndropped three Kent
State University basketball players, including leading rebounder
Larry Wilson, from the squad for the remainder of the season yes-
terday for training violations.
The other two players were Andy Meyer, a starter in Kent's
last four games, and substitute Dave Deasbeck.
Truit did not specify what the violations were, but did say they
came after Wednesday night's 65-56 loss to Bowling Green.
Wilson, a 6-5 senior from New Lebanon, Ohio, was averaging 7.7
rebounds a game and was the club's third leading scorer with a 9.9
point average.
Meyer, a 6-5 senior from Willoughby, Ohio, was Kent's top substi-
tute most of the season. Reasbeck, a 6-3 sophomore from Martins
Ferry, Ohio, had seen limited action in 12 games.

$
4
*

*1

I

Iva

I

0 CLEMSON, S.C. - Bobby Roberts, Clemson basketball coach,
has officially announced he is resigning at the end of this season.
In his eight years at the helm, Clemson has an 81-110 record
under Roberts, who played basketball at Furman. The 42-year-old
coach joined the Clemson staff in 1958 as an assistant to Press
Maravich and became head coach in 1962.
Clemson currently is 6-15 for the season with six games left,
plus an appearance in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament.

rt~ rN .''t 'r- -', 9 . C
- S

RCA
On Campus
Interviews
February 19 & 20

TREAT YOUR SWEETHEART

JUMBO'
M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger of 1/4 lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pick.es and ketchup .
/~ b4 I#G tEERY (?ERVIC
West of Arborland

A'

jAtfNTJ NfE '5 A

Engineering Rotational
Programs or Direct Assignments
BS and MS candidates in Engineering:
interview RCA, on campus, for our
Engineering Rotational Programs,
Manufacturing Management Development
Program or Direct Assignments in the
area of your skills. Openings are in
Research, Design, Development,
Manufacturing Engineering,
or Materials Management.

Computer Sales
and Systems
BS, BA and MBA candidates: interview RCA,
on campus, for our Computer Sales and
Systems Program. The program consists of
ten weeks of formal training at Cherry Hill,
New Jersey that will provide you with a
broad knowledge of the field of your
choice - Sales or Systems - followed by
an assignment at one of our field sales
offices located throughout the United States.
You will be working directly with the complete
Spectra 70 family of computers which are
highlighted by large-scale communications
and time-sharing applications.
See your placement officer to arrange an
interview with the RCA Representative.
Or write to RCA College Relations, Dept. EC,
Building 205-1, Camden, New Jersey 08101.
We are an equal opportunity employer.

-,Old eidelberg

21 1-213 N. Main 5t.

668-9753

0

Specializing in German and American Food
BANQUET FACILITIES
DANCING FRIDAY, SATURDAY, and SUNDAY
Friday and Saturday starting 9 P.M.
MARDI GRAS: THURS., FRI., AND SAT.
Feb. 5, 6, 7
PRIZES FOR THE BEST COSTUMES!
City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays
DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

BLIMPY BURGER
Come in and Try Our
KOSHER ZION PASTRAMI and
KOSHER ZION CORNED BEEF
Sandwiches on Onion Rolls
As well as many other Good Sandwiches
Corner Division and Packard
1 Block West of West Quad
Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)
BEST SELECTION OF SEAFOOD IN ANN ARBOR AREA
....

I

Bar-B-Q Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
RBr-R-O Beef

Shrimp
Scallops
Fried Chicken

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