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February 13, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-13

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7-9 P.M.

page t
Friday, February 13, 1970

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

A Great Screen Classic Returns
VIVIEN LEIGH
and MARION BRANDO

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

* U
in TENNESSEE WIILLIAMS'
"STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"
Screen Play by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS . Based upon theOiginal Play "A SreetuarNamed Dsire"by TENNESSEE WILtIAMS
As Pmented an the Stage by Irne Mayarteinick . Directed by ELI A KAZAN Re-released thru
United Atists
"TWO OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"
-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily
"TENDER, LOVING, FUNNY-SAD!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"Besides being one of the truly funny sophisticated
comedies, it starred one of the best looking chicks
ever." -Neal Gabler
iO fl[C 11 I3U SAVERY FUNNY,M BYAPFEAL
-inv Caby
N. Y.OHLUm .s-
"GOODBYE, COLUMBUS' IS
BOUND TO BE A GREAT
SUCCESS!"
"COLUMBUS"-Fri., Sat., 7:15.and 11:15-Sun. 7:15 only
"ROMEO"-Fri. 9:00 only-Sat. and Sun., 2:15, 4:45 and 9:00
"DAZZLING! once you see it, you'll never again picture
Romeo&Juliet'quitethe way you did before!" -LIFE
PARAMOUNT PICFURESpnent.
The
FRAwco ZEFIRau
ROMEO
AUJUET

Costs may!
limit aid to
minorities
(Continued from Page 1)
that by the next Regents meeting,
much better figures will be made
available," the president said. '
Fleming also met Wednesday c
with representatives of Studentsh
for Effective Action (SEA), which
has proposed partial financing of
increased minority admissions by a
assessing students $15 annually k
and faculty members $25 annually.
Both assessments would first have
to be approved in separate refer-
enda of students and faculty.
Beginning in the second year of
the SEA plan, the University a
would bear a certain percentage of
the costs involved in providing t
financial aid to the minority stu-
dents who are admitted under the 0
plan. The University's proportion t
of the cost would start at five per
cent and increase to 40 per cent1
by the fourth year of the plan.
Fleming expressed reservationst
about the feasibility of the plan,
noting that the cost would in,
crease each succeeding year as
the number of minority students
increased.
"You would obviously buildb
some terrible frustrations if youd
started the program and then
could not continue," Fleming said.
Hart talks
to lawy ers
(Continued from Page 1)r
Nixon's plan to end the war inb
Vietnam. He said Nixon's plan
"does not reserve us the free-
dom to withdraw -- it hinges on
how the South acts and the
North responds."
"It would be better to announce
a fixed date and have a complete
withdrawal that hinged on noth-
ing. .Whatever our committment
was, its time has run out and w
now we are only doing harm to c
ourselves and the rest of the
world," Hart said. t
He expressed fear that Nixonc
may be able to cut the casualty
rate significantly so that he will t
be able to continue American in-
volvement in Vietnam while re- o
ducing criticism at home. s

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
CHARGES WERE FILED against an Army officer alleging
a second massacre of South Vietnamese civilians occurred near
the hamlet of My Lai March 16, 1968, it has been learned.
The Pentagon is not releasing details, but military sources told
The Associated Press 20 deaths are alleged in unpremediated murder
charges lodged against Capt. Thomas K. Willingham, 25, of Allen-
hurst, N.J.
The alleged incident in which Willingham stands accused occurred
about two miles from My Lai where, according to the Army, Calley
killed 102 civilians March 16, 1968.
* * *
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE COLLEGE was ordered
closed by school officials for a 12-day cooling off period.
The nearly 900 students who were arrested Tuesday for staging
a protest march were freed on $25 bond on their own recognizance.
The school was closed after the fifth day of a class boycott called
o press for administration approval of 30 demands.
The students' demand included written rules governing conduct
of security officers, more public telephones, employment of a full-
ime campus physician, refunds for uneaten cafeteria meals, better'
qualified instructors, and ending of rules governing student dress.
* * *
ISRAELI PLANES bombarded a scrap metal factory north
of Cairo with time bombs, napalm, and rockets, killing at least
68 workers and wounding another 98, Egypt's military command
said.
The possibility of still more damage in the factory was raised
by an Israeli announcement that one of its planes might have acci-
dentally dropped a time bomb set to explode early today.
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan urged the Egyptians to find and
disarm the 880-pound bomb, which has a 24-hour fuse.
* * *
THE DRAFT will probably call lottery numbers no higher
than 90 in March, an informed source said.
The March ceiling is not official, however, and no orders have
gone out yet.
In January, draft boards were instructed to summon for military!
service only men with lottery numbers up to 30; in February the ceil-
ng number was 60.-
The January draft call of 12,500 was met within the No. 30 limit,
but it is not yet known whether the February call of 19,000 could be
met within the No. 60 limit. The March call is also for 19,000.
* * *
MORE THAN 200 AMERICANS disembarked in New Bruns-
wick after sailing from Cuba where they had spent several months
cutting sugar cane.
600 other Americans prepared to take their place.
The returning workers told those waiting to leave that they
worked seven hours a day and spent most of their free time reading
or talking.
"We came back understanding better than ever the necessity for
otal destruction of United States imperialism," said Patricia Bou-
hard, a spokesman for the returning group.
The U.S. press "has told vicious lies that we have received mill-
ary training in Cuba," she said. "This is not the first time a group
of Americans have gone to work to show solidarity with the Cubans,"
he added.

Students rally for workers
Students demand free meals for cafeteria and dorm workers
during a rally in the Fishbowl yesterday. The demonstration re-
ceived little response from passers-by, but speakers said it was
just the first action in a drive to forge a campus "worker and
student alliance."
HILLEL HOUSE:
Panel debates case
for abortion reform

By HESTER PULLING
"A physician cannot play god
with his patients. He knows that
girls he turns away may c o m e
back nearly dead," Dr. David
Bingham said Wednesday night in
a panel discussion on abortions
sponsored by the B'nai B'rith Hil-
lel Foundation.
"I've known girls so disraught
they were sticking knitting need-
les into themselves to be rid of the
fetus," Bingham added. "I appeal
for complete repeal of the abor-
tion law."
The panel also included Rabbi
James Gorden, Reverend Erwin
Gaede, Father Gerald Hughes, and
Barbara Rimer of Women's Lib-
eration.
Although all the speakers fav-
ored some type of abortion law
reform, they disagreed on wheth-

er or not non-theraputic abortions
were "moral." Hughes believed
them to be analogous to murder.
"How can one judge where be-
ing 'human' starts?" Hughes ask-
ed. "There is no f i n e breaking
point where life starts - human-
ity is one long sliding scale. We
have to accord to the fertilized
egg the rights of a human being."
In an attempt to answer
Hughes, Gaede quoted from an
article which said that a fertilized
egg is technically a part of the
mother - not an individual in its
own right - for at least the ini-
tial two weeks.
However, Miss Rimer t o o k a'
stand apart from both clergymen.'
"It's not a question of the rights
of the c h 11l d," she maintained,
"but those of the mother. A wo-'
man must be allowed to ha,,
complete control of her body."

Athletes'
privileges
continue
Board of Govs.
retains special
training tables
By DEBBIE THAL
The Board of Governors yes-
terday voted unanimously to
continue the existing policy
concerning the housing and
training table program for
athletes.
Currently, rooms for athletes
are reserved in a block by the ath-
letic department before they know
the names to put on the room and
board contracts. The rooms are
reserved in the residence halls
prior to placing freshmen.
Many of the athletes eat at a
special training table in a separate
room.
Controversy has arisen over the
placement of the athletes in cer-
tain central campus dorms-West
Quad and South Quad-and over
what dorm residents call the "spe-
cial treatment" they receive.
Representatives of the athletic
department yesterday defended
housing in West and South Quads
on two counts. First, they said it
was a practical necessity to have
the athletes living near the train-
ing fields. They also said that in
order to remain competitive with
other Big Ten schools, the recruit-
ers had to be able to designate a
more desirable dorm as the "place
where you would live" to the ath-
letes.
Athletic training tables have
come under attack for giving the
athletes better food tian the rest
of the dorm. Housing Director
John Feldkamp explained that
they pay for the extra food. He
added that the idea of a training
table as a source of revenue for
the residence hall had originated
in the Housing Office.
The board decided that the
training table will continue to
exist in South Quad next year.
Athletes will be housed in South
Quad, East Quad, and West Quad,
the three dorms most accesible
to the training fields. An attempt
will be made to scatter the ath-
letes as much as possible within
the individual dorms although ath-
letes will continue to room with
other athletes.
The board then considered the
question of eliminating breakfast
at Mosher-Jordan and week-end
meals at West Quad, both with
corresponding rate reductions for
next year. Optional meal contracts
would have been made available
in neighboring dorms.
Surveys indicate that many stu-
dents would be interested in op-
tional breakfast contracts. How-
ever, members of the board said
they felt they had no right to de-
prive the students who do eat
breakfast of their opportunity to
eat in their own dorm.
They also pointed out that no
complaint had been made to them
concerning the optional contracts,
and that there were no people
present from the halls concerned
who advocated the optional con-
tracts.
The lone dissenter in the vote
not to institute the meal options
was Inter-House Assembly presi-
dent Jack Meyers.
"There is clear proof that we
could expect up to 40 per cent of
dorm residents to desire a con-
tract without breakfast," he said.
He explained, however, that no
dorm with all the prerequisites for
such a meal plan now exists.

COMING SOON
~P T POPFellini, Vadim, Malle
"SPIRITSOF THE DEAD"

NOW
PLAYING

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTEN ThELaTr
375 No. MAPLE PD. '769-1300

TIMES
Mon.-Fri.
7:10 & 9:05

K.i I1

DUJSTIN HOFFMAN
MIA FARROW
W4~OHAND MARY

Need Something Invented?

Angered by slogan,

SAT.-SUN.
1:30-3:20-5:15
7:10-9:05

2c y3

* TON ITE-11:30 ONLY

TWO MEANINGFUL DRAMAS

A
Shook-Up
Story
Of The
Up-Tight
Generation 1I
.1DTIacFTURY Fox
PRESENITS {.
I LAWRENCE TURMAN
PRODUCTION
Jr '.'

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ANTHONY PERKI NS
TUESDAY WELD
NGUPMARSHAL BACKLARwNOEL BLACK
awI NOEL BLACKumtORENZO SEMPLEk
Ima a met En STEPNEN atu Emrw,#AIYsia
COtOR BY DUJXE
SWEMD FN MAMRE AUBICES|

WITH THE AWARD WINNING
.almost a love story!

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COLUMBIA
PICTURES;
presents
WIWu cA"co
WYLER'S
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