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February 11, 1970 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-11

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Wednesday, February 11, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Paoe Seven

old

shooting

cagers

overtaken,

78-73

.ith deviA j
____ ___ diicip/e
Bill Cusumano_
Since I am basically extremely lazy and due for
retirement at The Daily (which should gladden the hearts
of thousands, including me) I am taking the easy way out
on columns. Therefore, today I will give this space over to
Mr. Charles Fogelman, who on Monday afternoon kindly
gave me the following letter. Mr. Fogelman, it's all yours.
Mr. Cusumano:
It should be enough to identify oneself as a fan in order to
comment on your recent columns. But since so many people at
Michigan shout their inexpertise so loudly, I'd rather establish
my own credentials first. I grew up in New York city, in Madison
Square Garden, and therefore am more provincial than most
people, especially about basketball, since that sport has long'
been claimed (I think rightly) by my home town as its special
child, even as its lifeblood. When I was an undergraduate at
New York University, I was a cheerleader for about three years,
and captain for half that time. I think I was the only cheer-
leader in NCAA history to be evicted from a game while having
a technical foul called on him. Most. of my time during the forty
or so games that I participated in as a cheerleader at Madison
Square Garden during that period was taken up with yelling,
heckling, and drumbeating. We usually had about three. men
and six women on our squad, and a trumpeter or two in the
stands. We did not have a band.
I think your analysis of the situation here is basically good,
though occasionally a bit shallow. Most commendable is the
extent of your concern. While it is true that coordination be-
tween band and girls would be nice, more important would be
the band not working against the girls, as they did at least
three times, for example, during the Northwestern game (I see
the girls as basically guiltless here, but definitely at fault in
other areas), I'd suggest that what they need is a bass drum
behind them, manned by someone with endless enthusiasm, a
sense of rhythm, and a knowledge of basketball and crowds. The
band is fine for an occasional chorus of "The Victors," the
Alma Mater (by the way, where has it been at basketball
games?), and the National Anthem; they're probably too sym-
phonic to be used frequently. A trumpeter's charge would prob-
ably be nice sometimes as well. While coordinated band-girl
routines are admittedly nice and eye-pleasing, they should cer-
tainly not be used at times-out, which are usually high peaks of
momentum' or deep valleys of falling behind for the team.
Nothing does more harm to a team's cause in the stands when
it is ggining momentum than to have a long drawn-out cheer
keeping the stands' enthusiasm in check. A simple rhythmic
cheer works best in these situations. Routines should be left to
pregame or halftime displays.
In line with simplicity and rhythm, the girls should have
a basic repertoire of perhaps two or three offensive, one or two
defensive, one rallying from behind, one staving off the op-
position and one momentum maintaining cheers, all of which
should be made to be well known to the stands. The cheer-
leaders should cue in the band, they should be in charge; "The
Victors" is a ready-made rallying point, and should be used
4 sparingly for best effectiveness. An occasional new cheer should,
of course, be tested out, and any cheer (or song-we have many)
should willingly be dropped if it is ineffective.
This year's girls themselves certainly have .spirit, and, in
some sense, class. They .are not, however, special enough to look
at, and this can be a female cheerleader's most singular and
effective attribute. This is not to say that they are unattractive,
'which they by no means are. Pom-poms and occasional flowing
hair are their only successful attempts at flair. Their skirts
(culottes are fine for acrobats; they do not, however, allow for
sufficient diversion should certainly be shorter, (historically,
cheerleaders have been much higher up the thigh than the
general body politic-ours are certainly not), and maybe the
uniform design as a whole should be redone. A blue M on a field
of maize across their derrieres might be an idea. They need as
well to be better heard. Here megaphones, or men, or more
microphones like Miss Loken wears would serve well. Neverthe-
less, your observation that the brunt of the yelling burden
should be on the crowd is good, and we are certainly frequently
at fault. It is, however, a pipe dream to expect the crowd to react
at all times. Cheerleaders must always be shouting and banter-
ing, except when that is clearly functional. A crowd should
always be heckling, only part of the time cheering in an organ-
ized fashion.
Which brings me to a final point of consideration, namely
we in the stands. As you were quite right in saying, we should
be made more accessible to the cheerleaders, and the floor to
us. In any crowd there will be addicts, actives, passives, hangers-
on, dates, and, as you so very aptly put it, "fat cats". (In New .
York there were usually bookies, celebrity voyeurs, or University
Administrators, though some of the latter were, in their own
way, loyal, devoted, and addicted fans). It's not clear to me
why the Events Building has so many who are so frequently
passive, but I don't think it's because we think ourselves too

sophisticated. More can be attributed to the lack of a winner
than you seem to imply. I suspect, though, I don't know, that
people here have had too few models to learn the art of fandom-
from, and maybe it's because of this that many fans are often
self-conscious about yelling, especially when they don't know
whether they're yelling the right thing. They should know in-
stinctively that anything is the right thing at a basketball game.
But how can they, when football has always been King here?
And how can they know to follow cheerleaders when they're.
so used to seeing performers who expect applause and not
decibels? (I think, however, that men have an important
function on a cheerleading squad, to add volume and strength to
the sexuality and the rhythm of the girls).
The above is an incomplete attempt at analysing and
recommending from that analysis, much as you tried to do in
your columns. There is clearly room for improvement; I hope we
can get off both our collective and individual asses, for nothing
garnishes (old sense), the exploits of a fiery team better than
a fired-lip crowd.
Oh, and another thing-at Madison Square Garden they
served beer.
Yours,
Charles Fogelman
Teaching Fellow in Psychology
I appreciate Mr. Fogelman's letter, as I like any
letter that agrees with me even the slightest. He is know-
ledgeable in the field and what is more important, he
cares. He offered his help to the cheerleaders at the begin-
ning of the season and I think they could help themselves
by listening to the expert advice he has to offer.
He was raised in, and worked in, the toughest fan area
in tha nauntr to nlt-w%. O r Vrntlr fln ra m . "l.t 4 -

By ERIC SIEGEL
Special To The Daily
EVANSVILLE - The Wolverine
cagers played like they didn't want
to win last night, and they didn't,
bowing to the Evansville Purple
Aces 78-73 in a non-conference,
basketball game at Roberts Arena.
The Wolverines, who shot a
meager 36.9 per cent for the eve-
ning and turned the ball over to
the Purple Aces a total of 16 times
during the game, went into the
half trailing 40-35. The Wolver-

i ines couldn't even hit their free{

throw attempts, collecting only
of 22 free bees compared to 18
23 by the Purple Aces.

11
of

Although the Wolverines domi-
nated the boards in that first
stanza, outrebounding their foes
by a margin of 39-28, they were
able to get off only one more shot
than the Purple Aces, as they re-
peatedly had the ball stolen by the
swift Evansville guards.
In the second half, the story
was even more discouraging, as

Aces High

the Wolverines outboarded the
Purple Aces 28-14 but managed
two less shots at the basket.
Once again, the Wolverines were
hurt by turnovers. Evansville's 6-3
sophomore guard Don Buse was
the main culprit, stealing the ball
from the sluggish Maize and Blue
nine times during the game.
Buse, who vanguarded the Aces
pressing man-to-man, was also
Evansville high scorer during
the game with 20 points. Buse's
total matched that compiled by
the Wolverines' Rudy Tomjano-
vich. Tomjanovich's total was 10
below his average. The 6-7 for-
ward could never quite find the
range during the night, hitting
on only 8 of 23 from the floor.
Tomjanovich was not alone in!
his poor shooting though. Dan Fife
hit only 4 of 15 from the field.!
Bird Carter could manage just 6
for 18, and Rick Bloodworth hit
only 1 of 7.
In fact, the only Wolverines
who didn't leave their shooting

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JERRY CLARKE
eyes back in Ann Arbor were
Wayne Grabiec and Bill Frau-
mann. Fraumann, who was play-
ing in place of the injured Rod-
ney Ford, made good on all his
five shots from the field and also
aided the Wolverines with 16 re-
bounds, and Grabiec dumped in
6 of 7 from the field to total 12
points.
In fact, it was Grabiec and
braumann who gave the Wolver-
ines their only bright moments of
the evening after the Purple Aces
increased their 40 to 35 halftime
lead to 54-47 with just 13:39 left
in the game. The Wolverines out-
scored Evansville 18 to 6 to takea
65-60 lead with 6:11 remaining.
Grabiec hit on three field goals
during that spurt while Fraumann
added three points of his own.

Henry
Fife
Carter
Fraumann
Tom janovich
Bloodworth
Hayward
Grabiec
Buse

MICHIGAN
fg
0
4
6
8
t $
6
Totals 31I
EVANSVILLE

ft
2-3
2-6
1-3
2-4
4-6
0-0
0-0
0-0
11-22

t
2
10
13
12
20
2
2
12
73

r'
3
6
13
16
16
3
1
4
62

Weimer 8 2-4 18 14
Mcissic 4 2-4 10 6
Welmeyer 6 2-3 14 4
Clayton 2 0-0 4 2
Owens 4 0-0 8 3
Moore 0 2-2 2 0
Guth 0 2-2 2 0
Totals 30 18-23 78 43
Michigan 35 38-73
Evansville 40 38-78
Fouled out-Michigan, Fife.
ITotal fouls-Michigan 15, Evansville

i

16.
Turnovers-Evansville 12, Michigan 26.

6 8-8 20 14C

SCORING RECORD SET:
Iowa rolls over W

N ~~dbhT5) "

By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Iowa ran
its Big Ten Conference basketball
record to 7-0 and set a school
scoring record by beating a hot-
shooting Wisconsin team 119-100
here last night.
It was the Hawkeyes' ninth
straight win and the ninth straight
game in which they shot better
than 50 per cent from the field.
The loss dropped the Badgers to
3-4 in conference play.
The Hawks used a shifting zone
defense to hold down fouls in the
first half while forcing 15 Badger
turnovers. But Wisconsin hit 58
per cent of its first-half shots to
keep the game close before Iowa
caught fire, spurted to a 58-44
halftime advantage and coasted
home.
Clarence Sherrod of Wisconsin
led all scorers with 35 points.
John Johnson* and Chad Calabria
shared scoring honors for Iowa
with 29 each. Glenn Vidnovic add-
ed 24 and Ben McGilmer 20 for
the Hawks.
Al Henry hit 22 points for Wis-
consin and pulled down 13 re-
bounds, as well as blocking nu-
merous Hawkeye shots. Lloyd
Adams hit 20 points andsgrabbed
10 rebounds for the Badgers.

Records mount
LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue's
All-American 'Rick Mount broke
the school's all-time career scor-
ing record last night in leading
the Boilermakers to a 98-80 Big
Ten basketball victory over In-
diana.
Mount scored 41 points, pushing
his three year total to 2,093.
The old mark was Dave Schell-
hase's 2,074. Mount, who hit 16
of 28 from the field and 9 of 10
free throw attempts, broke the
record with 24 points in the first
half.
Purdue scored nine straight
points to take a 20-11 lead with
eight minutes left in the first half
and never was threatened. The
Big Ten defending champions led
43-34 at halftime.
Jim Harris and Rick Ford each
scored 19 points to lead Indiana,
now 1-6 in conference play and
5-12 overall. Purdue is 6-2 in the
Big Ten and 13-5 overall.
OSU burns
EAST LANSING - Ohio State
had the second best shooting per-
centage in Big Ten history as the
Buckeyes blasted the Michigan
State, University Spartans 89-66
at East Lansing last night in a
coneference basketball game.
The Buckeyes hit the first 11
shots from the floor in the second
half and posted a .685 game mark
as they scored on 37 of 54 shots.
The best percentage ever was .723
for Minnesota in a 1960 game
against Iowa.
MSU's coach Gus Ganakas said
"it was all wrapped up in the
shooting tonight. Ohio State has
a real poised club, with five great
shooters."
Ohio State exploded to lead
Michigan State at the half, 40-30.
The closest MSU came after the
Buckeyes' second half spurt was
15 points.
Jim Cleamons led Ohio State
with 29 points, while Michigan

I (I1 1But the Wolverines' spurt was
short lived, as the Maize and Blue
State sophomore Ralph Simpson quickly reverted to their earlier
paced the Spartans with 20 points. form, missing several shots from
* * * the floor and turning the ball over
a couple of times. The Purple
Louisville wins !Aces, who themselves hit only 35

WICHITA - Louisville battled
back in the second half to defeat
Wichita State 91-84 in a bruising,
aggressive Missouri Valley Confer-
ence basketball game last night.
The important victory for the
Cardinals kept them close on the
heels of Drake in the conference
race. Louisville is 9-1 in the Val-
ley and 14-4 overall.
Mike Lawhon, Louisville's lead-
ing free throw shooter, tossed in
10 straight in the second half.
Big Ten
r Standings

per cent of their field goals, put
everything together for the next
couple of minutes and roared back
into a 71-65 lead with Just a little
over two minutes left in the game.
The Wolverines narrowed that
lead by only one point at the final
gun, but not for want of oppor-
tunity.
With 59 seconds left to play, ,.
Carter scored on the fast break to
make the score 73-71 and the Wol-
verines got the ball right back
again when Evansville was called
for traveling.
But then Buse stole the ball off
Bloodworth, and a few seconds
later John Wellemeyer scored twoa
of his most important points of
the evening to give the Purple
Aces a 75-71 lead.
In .the next few seconds, the
Wolverines missed half a dozen
shots and committed a pair of
fouls to stifle any thoughts they
had of a last second comeback.

-Daly--Sara Krulwich
BILL FRAUMANN (35), Michigan center, passes off to a team-
mate in one of the Wolverine's contests earlier in the season.
Fraumann was an integral part of the team last night, as he ably
filled In for the injured Rod Ford, grabbing, 16 rebounds and
scoring 12 points.

....

~EI

JUST ARRIVED !
Copies of
"IN THE COUNRTY
OF THE YOUNG"
By PROFESSOR JOHN W. ALDRIDGE

W L Pct.
Iowa 7 0 1.000
Purdue 6 2 .750
Illinois 5 2 .714
Minnesota 5 3 .625
Ohio State 5 3 .625
Wisconsin 3 4 .429
MICHIGAN 3 5 .375
Michigan State 2 6 .286
Indiana 1 6 .143
Northwestern 1 7 .125
Yesterday's Results
Evansville 78, MICHIGAN 73
Purdue 98, Indiana 80
Ohio State 89, Michigan State 6
Iowa 119, Wisconsin 100

Buy at
FOLLETT'S
State St. at N. Univ.

L-

.. .t:.(~ %'

f

:'

66

Scores

College Basketball Results
Notre Dame 90, St. John's, N.Y. 76
Florida State 98, Florida Southern 74
Army 85, Coast Guard 34
NYU 85, Lehigh 72
George Washington 98, Richmond 85
Massachusetts 83, Holy Cross 66
Arkansas 76, Baylor 76
Texas A&M 79; Texas 70
Dayton 64, St. Louis 61
Rice 66, Southern Methodist 63
Texas Tech 75, Texas Christian 60
Louisville 91, Wichita State 84
W. Mch. 94, Loyola of Chicago 93
Colgate 97, St. Lawrence 94
Northern Iowa 83, Central Missouri 74
Midland 72, Nebraska Concordia 70
Trinity 76, George Williams 67
Peru 89, Doane 87

U

on"

Summer Camp Positions
Camp Tamarack (Fresh Air Society
of Detroit) has positions available
for counselors; specialists in water-
front, arts and crafts, nature-camp-
craft, tripping, dramatics, dance
and music; unit and assistant unit
supervisors; caseworker; nur ses;
physicians; and truck-bus drivers.
Also staff needed for Marionette
Theatre, program for emotionally
disturbed boys, and northerntout-
post camps. Main camps located at
Brighton and Ortonville, Mich.
W.S.U. credit courses offered in ed.
psych up to four hours. Marvin
Berman interviewing on February 11
at Summer Placement Office.

........3W'Gk .t M.t+... kmJ {:.. n'"... is....«".....tiY :v- .w .+. r
THURSDAY 12:00 NOON
(Rm. No. 2, South Side Basemen
THIS WEEK:
"WOMENS LIBERATION AS
THE UNIVERSIT
Free and Open to Ev
Bring your lunch; Buy your lunch; or
OFFICE OF STUDEN
OFFICE OF R

MICHIGAN UNION
t Cafeteria)
SSUE4s
IT AFFECTS
lY"
'eryone
r just come talk
IT ORGANIZATIONS, 1011 S.A.B.
RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS, 2282 S.A.B.

o.°r{:?/. fi::: 'A' T."Y :AWAVt-.AS'AV:.AS y=:'{". Wr .:rY:","",y; :.r:. W 3YS"P;W"WAAAAAVVAA 'x,
*. : ~v..:tiAVA.A±,J~flA.AA....t : $:..+.. :e !. i,". t.avAVAVA. A.:D v " %. v"t. i:'~.;

Professional Standings

NBA
East Division
W L6Pct. GB!
New York 49 12 .803 -
Milwaukee 42 19 .689 --7
Baltimore 37 23 .617 11Y
Philadelphia 31 30 .508 18
Boston 25 34 .424 23
Cincinnati 27 37 .422 23%
Detroit 23 39 .371 26%
- West Division
Atlanta 35 27 .565 -
Los Angeles 32 27 .542 1
Phoenix 29 33 .467 6
Chicago 27 36 .429 8/
San Francisco 25 34 .424 8%
Seattle 24 37 .393 10%
San Diego 19 37 .339 13
Yesterday's Results
Cincinnati 117, Detroit 115
Milwaukee 139, Philadelphia 131
Phoenix 122, Boston 117
Baltimore at Los Angeles, inc.
Atlanta vs. San Francisco at Oakland,
inc.
Today's Ganes
Detroit vs. Cincinnati at Omaha
Boston at New York'
Phoenix at Milwaukee
Atlanta at San Diego
Los Angeles at San Francisco
Baltimore at Seattle
NHL
East Division
W L T Pt. GFGA
New York 30 10 10 70 179 113
Boston 28 12 12 68 199 156

Montreal 28 12 12 68 177
Detroit 26 16 8 60 150
Chicago 25 18 7 57 153
Toronto 21 21 8 50 150
West Division
St. Louis 24 19 7 55 150
Philadelphia 13 21 18 44 136
Pittsburgh 17 25 8 42 122
Oakland 14 30 8 36 112
Minnesota 10 25 15 35 142
Los Angeles 9 36 5 23 108
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
Toronto at Montreal
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Boston at St. Louis
New York at Los Angeles
Minnesota at Oakland
ABA
East Division
W L Pct. G
Indiana 41 12 .774 -
Kentucky 30 22 .577 1
Carolina 24 28 .462 L
New York 26 32 .448 1
Pittsburgh 19 33 .365 2
Miami 14 39 .264 2'
West Division
New Orleans 30 22 .577 -
Denver 30 25 .545
Dallas 27 25 .519
Washington 27 26 .509
Los Angeles 24 27 .462
Yesterday's' Games
Washington 137, Los Angeles 123
New Orleans 97, Carolina 84

13
133
115
149
122
157
162
172
175
194

r

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