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February 10, 1970 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-10

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Tuesday, February 10, 1970

THE-MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, February 10, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ager.
By PHIL HERTZ
Fresh from its first home win
of the decade, Coach Johnny Orr's
Michigan basketball squad will de-
part from. the now friendly con-
fines of the Events Building to-
night for a tough non-conference
contest at basketball hotbed
Evansville.
Coach Arad McCutchan's Purple
Aces gained their reputation in
the 1960's when they were one of
the nation's top small college pow-
ers; however, since joining the
ranks of the major college basket-
ball teams, successes for Evans-
ville have become considerably less
frequent.
Evansville is currently 10-9 this
season, but the Aces had won four
straight contests before dropping
a 104-89 decision to DePauw Sa-
turday.
Orr is vary wary of the Purple
Aces at home. The Michigan men-
tor noted yesterday, "Evansville. is
a real hot basketball town, and it
helps their players. They're really
tough at home, and they've beat-
en some real good teams in Evans-
ville." The Purple Aces have won
eight of eleven home starts this
year and number among their vic-
tims, a Rick Mount-less Purdue
five.~~
BESIDES Purdue, the only other
common opponent for Michigan
and Evansville has been Butler.
The Wolverines decimated Butler,
105-65, at the Events Building
while the Purple Aces fell 94-88
at Butler.
"They're not very big, but
they're bigger than us" was the
way Orr described Evansville. The
Michigan coach also added, "I ex-
pect we'll see a man-to-man de-
fense, and they may press us."
The leading weapons for M c -
Cutchan's squad are 6-5 senior
Mike Owens, a quick 6-0 squad
James Mckissic, and a 6-3 sopho-
more defensive specialist Don
Buse. Also likely to see action are
6-5 Layne Holmes and 6-4 forward
John Wellemeyer. Owens is often
the, team's top scorer.
For the Wolverines, Dan Fife
and Mark Henry will man the
Big Ten
FStandings

confront

Purple

Aces

AGAINST THE WALL:
Hoosier tanker dynasty...
. .when will it end?

sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL AILTERMAN
guard slots as usual, Rudy Tom-
janovich and Bird Carter will be
at forward and Rod Ford will be
the pivotman.
Orr had nothing but praise for
the starting five, and for that
matter the entire team, after Sa-
turday's triumph. Orr commented,
"They all played well. We did a
pretty good job on defense, with
the exception of Dale Kelley, and
Rudy had another fine game."
THE BIG T, who was hamper-
ed Saturday by a strained arch,
will be out to continue his assault
on the Michigan all-time r e c o r d
book. The 6-8 Wolverine captain
has now scored 484 points in six-
teen contests and also pulled down
246 rebounds.
Rudy currently has the highest
rebounidinig average in Wolverine
history of 14.2 a game, better than
the late Bill Buntin's 13.1 mark.
He is also third in career points
behind Cazzie Russell and Buntin
and second in total rebounds be-
hind Buntin. His current 30.3 scor-
ing average for this season will set
another mark.'
Tomianovich should have little
trouble passing Buntin for second
place in the career scoring derby,
and has a chance of setting a
career rebounding mark despite
playing seven less games than
Buntin. Rudy currently has 909 re-
bounds, 128 short of Buntin's
career mark and he has e i g h t
games remaining. including t o-
night's contest,, meaning the Big
T must average 16 a game to break
Buntin's mark.

By JIM KEVRA
It's not easy for a team, particularly a college
team, to build a dynasty. First of all, there is
the problem of recruiting the personnel to make
you the national champion. Then, because of loss-
es due to graduation, a college coach has to
rebuild his team completely every four years. Add
to this the fact that since you are the national
champion, every other school in the country will
be trying extra hard to beat you and you see
some of the problems involved in building a
dynasty.
Despite these complications, Indiana Univer-
sity has truly built themselves into a swimming
dynasty.
Building a dynasty takes time; in Indiana's
case it took thirteen years. Back in 1958, the
Hoosiers hired Doc Counsilman to coach their
swimming team. In Counsilman, they got one of
the shrewdest coaches in the country and also
one of the best recruiters.
IT WAS three years before Counsilman's in-
fluence started to show. In 1961, the Hoosiers cap-
tured their first Big Hen Swimming champion-
ship. Since then, they have added eight 'more
in a row with the Wolverines finishing second
every year.
Indianacompletely dominated the nationals in
1969 as they picked up points in every event. Ex-
cept for three events (the 200-yard butterfly, the
100-yard freestyle, and the 50-yard freestyle) they
had at least one man finish in the top three. Their
best performance was the one-meter diving where
the Big Red swept the event finishing one-two-
three.
As for this years team, Michigan's head swim-
ming coach Gus Stager commented," Counsilman
has probably the greatest swimming team he's
ever had down there". Stager is a living testament
to the strength of the Indiana swimming team as
last Friday night, the Hoosiers destroyed his Wol-

verines, 91-32. The defeat was the worst that the
Michigan tankers have had in recent years.
What makes this margin of victory even more
impressive is the fact that Michigan had a good
swimming team, probably one of the ten best
teams in the country, and that the Wolverines
swam some of their best races of the season.
Commenting on the large margin of victory,
Counsilman explained, "This is the only real dual
meet competition that we'll have this year, so
I had to throw everything we had into the meet
to see how far we've progressed. But, I didn't
expect that they'd swim out of their minds like
they did. I sort of feel sorry for Gus."
AS FAR AS this years NCAA championship, it
should be a walkaway for the Big Red. When
asked, if anyone could beat the Hoosiers, Stager
replied, "I doubt it. Stanford might be able to
give them a good run in swimming but they have
no divers." He also added that the Wolverines
would be in a seven or eight way battle for second
place but that it was "too early to tell" how they
would do.
Indiana's domination of swimming the past
few years can be traced to the excellent recruiting
of Counsilman. By selling high school students
on the idea that "to be a great swimmer, you have
to practice with great swimmers", Counsilman has
persuaded (among others) the two best swimmers
in the United States, Mark Spitz and Gary Hall,
to attend Indiana. Both Spitz and Hall were two-
time American record holders while they were still
high school students.
As to how long Indiana's reign can go on, the
answer is not clear. Stager said that "other schools
will have to do some good recruiting" before they
can hope to challenge the, Hoosiers. With their
strong freshman-sophomore contingent, Indiana
will not be too seriously hurte by graduation for a
few years.

-Daily-Sara Krulwich

RUDY TOMJANOVICH angles,.
in two points during last Sat-
urday's 95-84 win while three
Northwestern defenders look on
helplessly. Rudy is closing in on
Bill Buntin for second place in
Michigan career scoring.

This Week in Sports

L'

Iowa
Illinois
Purdue:
Minnesota
Ohio State
Wisconsin
MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Indiana
Northwestern

W
6
5
5
5
4
3,
3'
2:
1

L
0
2
2
S
3
3
5
7

POt.
1.000
.714
.714
.625
.571
.50!
.375
.286
.167
.125

TODAY
BASKETBALL-at Evansville, 9 p.m. (Radio-WAAM)
FRIDAY
HOCKEY--at Wisconsin
GYMNASTICS-INDIANA STATE and SOUTHERN
at Indiana State
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL--at Wisconsin
HOCKEY--at Wisconsin
WRESTLING--at Iowa
SWIMMING-at Illinois
GYMNASTICS-at Indiana
TRACK-MICHIGAN STATE RELAYS at East Lansing

4

ILLINOIS

aq

Not until you find out just
how rewarding a career in
Computer Sales or Systems
Support is with RCA.
Computer Salesmen at RCA
are selling packages that are
eighteen months ahead of the
major competitor.

First we have the Octoputer.
It combines time-sharing and
regular processing in a new
remote computer package.
Then we produced Octoputer's
big brother-Octoputer II. It
boosts programming efficiency
as much as 40%. It tackles

STILL ON TOP

Bru ins romp in polls

bigger jobs at three times the
speed. And, it can support over
350 remote terminals.
If this sounds good, you
should know we intend to
double our sales force in 1970.
We also intend to increase
our business at twice the rate
of the computer industry.
Our sales force is drawn from
a variety of majors-a technical
degree is not required-in
fact, one of our most
successful salesmen was a
music major..
Also, you might prefer being
with a corporation that is
diverse, technologically
sophisticated, and highly
concerned with human values.
If Computer Sales sounds
like your thing-we would
like to talk to you.
Contact your College
Placement Director, or write td
RCA College Relations,
Dept. L, Cherry Hill,
Camden, New Jersey 08101..
We not only believe in equal
opportunity employment-,
we practice it.

By The Associated Press
The UCLA Bruins, college bas-
ketball's only unbeaten team, re-,
mained in their usual position
atop the Associated Press' weekly
ratings Monday while Florida
State snuck into the Top 10 for
the' first time this season.
'The Bruins continued to bore
basketball fans by rolling o v e r
Washington 66-56 Saturday night
for their 17th straight win. Flor-
dia State whipped tough Dayton
and pushover Kent State for an
18-2 season mark and a c 1im b,
from 12th to .ninth in the rank
rankings.
Spoilsport South Carolina kept
UCLA from, complete supremacy
in the poll by drawing one first
place vote, but the Bruins grab-
bed the other 27.
The first'six spots remained un-
changed from last week as Ken-
tucky, St. Bonaventure, North
Carolina State and New Mexico
State followed the 17-1 Game-
cocks.
Pushing on the top six from the
rear are skyscraping Jacksonville,
17-1, up one spot to number sev-
en; Pennsylvania, 19-1, up two
places to eighth; Florida State,
the only team to beat Jackson-
ville this year; and North Caro-
lina, 14-4, which plummeted three
places to tenth. This gives the At-
lantic Coast Conference three,
teams in the Top 10, a feat no
other conference in the nation can
match.
Marquette, despite the frantic
antics of super-duper Dean Mem-
inger, fell to 14-3 and No. 12 after

-dropping a tough 96-95 double-
overtime g a m e to Notre Dame.
The Irish, finally starting to play
some ball, lifted their mark to 14-
5 and are now crouched danger-
ously in the No. 16 spot.
Other newcomers to the Top 20
beside Notre Dame were Ohio Val-
ley Conference leaders Western
Kentucky and Southeast Confer-
ence co-leader (with Kentucky)
Georgia. Illinois, Kansas State
and Villanova, all losers last week,
dropped out of the Top 20. Illinois
got burned by Wisconsin last Sat-
urday, a loss which dimmed their
already miniscule Big Ten cham-
pionship hopes.
The magical Second_ 10 in or-
der: Drake, Marquette; Davidson,

I o w a, Houston,

Notre Dame,y

Western Kentucky, Southern Cal-
ifornia, Columbia and Georgia.

1. UCLA 27
2. SouthcCarolina 1
3. Kentucky
4. St. Boneventure
5. North Carolina St.
6. New Mexico St.
7. Jacksonville
S. Pennsylvania
a. Florida State
10. North Carolina
11. Drake
12. Marquette
13. Davidson
14. Iowa
15. Houston
16. Notre Dame
17. W. Kentucky
18. Southern California,
19. Columbia
20. Georgia

17-0
17-1
17-1
15-1
17-1
18-2
17-1
19-1
18-2
14-4
16-4
14-3
16-3
11-4
16--3
14-5
15-2
13-4
16-3
11-6

540
476
423
343
313
255
236
195
154
109
108
73
61
56
50
35
34
33
17
13

Gamecocks roll on

COLUMBIA, S.C. (P) -- Second-
ranked South Carolina demolish-
ed Wake Forest's stalling attempts
in the first half last night and
then ran away from the Deacons
for an 81-54 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference basketball victory.
South Carolina, which has now
won 17 straight, abandoned i t s
zone defense when ,Wake Forest
went into a stall in the opening
moments.
The Gamecocks topk a 6-3 lead
on three long jump shots by John
Roche and gradually built the
mark to 28-15 at halftime.
Wake Forest came out run-
ning in the second half and scored

the first four points, but the
Gamecocks, with their massive
front line, got numerous easy bas-
kets and outscored the Deacons 53-
29 in the second period.
Roche and Tom Owens led the
Gamecocks with 24 points each
while Charlie Davis was the high
scorer for Wake Forest with 22.
The Gamecocks topped the Dea-
cons in rebounding 44-19 with
Owens, the conference leader, get-
ting 18.
Tar Heels squeak by
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. ,(P)-Soph-
omore Dennis Wuycik sank a pair
of free throws with four seconds
left last night to cap a stunning
comeback and give North Caro-
lina an 88-86 basketball victory
over fifth-ranked North Carolina
State.
Wuycik's charity shots followed
a Tar Heel comeback which saw
the 10th ranked home team bounce
from a 12-point second half
,deficit.
North Carolina reeled off 10
straight points late in the half
to overtake the Wolfpack and
claim the lead at the 7:53 mark.
r c"?.; .. rs;;wv:;q rSr~sy

'Big E blasts Rockets,;
Cowboy sues old school
By The Associated Press
0 SAN DIEGO - Elvin Hayes says he's had it with the slumping
San Diego Rockets and would relish being traded to the National
Basketball Association's newly-awarded franchise in Houston.
Hayes termed his team "a bunch of losers" following Sunday
night's 125-113 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.
"@HOUSTON - Dallas 'Cowboy defensive back Otto Brown has

/

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