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February 08, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-08

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The Halfway Inn
East Quad's Coffeehouse & Snackbar
Inexpensive Luncheons, Dinners, Snacks

Integration still

lags

in

Southern schools

CONTINUOUSLY OPEN STAGE-
ALL WELCOME TO PERFORM
or Just Come In and Jam'
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs.-1 1:00 A.M.-2 A.M.
Fri.-1 1 :00 A.M.-3 A.M.
Sot.-7:30 P.M. -3 A.M.
Sun.-3:00 P.M.-12 A.M.
Informal Atmosphere, Good Food

By The Associated Press a
Integration remained largely un- r
accomplished yesterday in many r
of the more than 30 Southern
school districts ordered to end se- i
parate classes for blacks and i
whites a week ago. r
In some instances, the school
system under Feb. 1 deadlines set
by the U. S. Supreme Court, 5thi
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals orr
U.S. districts Courts did not com- t
ply with the orders.
In many of those districts that
did carry out the court orders,i e
white pupils generally boycotted o
schools in which they would be tl
greatly outnumbered by blacks c

nd large increases in white en-
ollment in private schools were
eported.
In others, parents stood by wait-
rng developments before decid-
ng whether to send their child-
en to newly integrated schools.
Violent incidents were few, and
n at least one district, Alachua
"ounty Gainesville, Fla., expected
rouble failed to materialize as in-
tgration plans went into effect.
Gainesville police had been giv-
n riot equipment in anticipation
f disturbances, but 600 pupils of
[he recently closed, all-black Lin-
oln High School transferred to
e

three other schools without trou-
ble.
White threats of massive with-
drawals from schools failed to de-
velop as the schools opened Fri-
day.
Florida had three days of racial
flareups at Manatee High School
in Brandeton, where a brick-throw-
ing melee on campus injured as
many as 15 persons Wednesday.
Eight blacks and three w h i t e s
were arrested Thursday in con-
nection with the incident, while
state troopers turned back 200
protesting black pupils at the
tense high school.

The confrontation came after
an emergency meeting of t h e
Manatee County School Board,
which voted to appeal to U.S. dis-
trict judge Ben Krentzman for re-
hearing on an April 6 deadline to
begin mass bussing.
However, whites stayed away in
large numbers in Madison and
Corcordia parishes, with nearly
half of the white pupils in Tal-
lulah, La., enrolling at a private+
school.
Officials of Mississippi's large
school district - Jackson - re-
ported everything going smoothly
when classes opened Friday under
new desegregation plans.

There were indications, how- Mobile County schools reported
ever, a significant number of white only 55,000 pupils enrolled under
itedfo dsemes-new integration plans ,although
pupis registered for second sesa70,000 had registered originally. In
ter did not report for classes at spite of an order for immediate
their assigned schools. integration, the Mobile school
In two districts - Tunica and board voted Thursday to put off
Indianola - some 1,000 white pup- the transfer of pupils until March
ils stayed home, with the publicj 16.

schools turning all black.
Every private school in ManateeI
C',unty Bradenton, Fla., is jam-I
med to capacity, and plans are in
the works to open several n e w
schools. Enrollment at three
white private schools in Jackson
was reported to have jumped from
500 to 3,000 between semesters.

The Supreme Court refused to
grant a delay in the desegregation
of Greenville and Darlington
County public schools in S o u t h
Carolina, and set a Feb. 16 hear-
ing for a proposal that Memphis,
Tenn., schools be desegregated
during the current school year.

!!

TON IGHT
Cpeatie Ipt4 lejtsaI
PROUDLY PRESENTS-
Louis Falco and Company of
Featured Dancers
A Journey thru Your Mind and Body
8:.30P.M.--Hill Aud.

page three

MfIA-rirtitan

aipt*i1y

NEWS PHONE: 764.0 552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Sunday, February 8, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

11

II

l

the

i

TON IGHT

TON fGHT

COMING NEXT WEEK:
From Off Broadway
"THE CONCEPT"-Feb. 12, 13-Trueblood
Psychodrama with ex-addicts
and
TOM WOLF
TICKETS: 1st Floor Union
M-F 11 :00-4:00-Sat. 1 :00-3:00-Sun. 1:00-3:00

I

U U

by The Associated Press and College Press Service
B52 BOMBERS returned to Vietnam's skies yesterday ig-
noring a Viet Cong cease-fire for Tet, the lunar new year.
The Viet Cong called for a four-day cease fire but the U.S. com-
mand wanted only a one day moratorium on fighting.
Targets were suspected enemy troop concentrations and bases
near the Cambodian border northwest of Saigon and in Binh Tuy
Province, east of the capital.
No significant change in the fighting occurred during the 24-hour
allied cease fire according to a U.S. spokesman.
ARAB LEADERS representing five countries met in Cairo
as Israeli attacks escalated.
During the past few weeks, Israeli air attacks have reached
the suburbs of Cairo and come closer to the capital than at any
time since the 1967 war.
Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser was said by informants
to have expressed concern over United States involvement in the
increasingly dangerous situation.
Yesterday The New York Times reported that the Nixon Admin-
istration has already decided to supply Israel with additional Phan-
tom jets. The State Department denied the report. There was no
immediate comment in Cairo.
* * *
CONSUMER ADVOCATE RALPH NADER announced the
start of "Campaign GM," which will attempt to force General
Motors to pay more attention to the public interest.
Althoug GM is the initial target, other large corporations will
be tackled in a continuing program to make them more responsive
to consumer and public welfare.
A group called the Project on Corporate Responsibility, which
owns 12 shares of GM stock, will represent the movement at GM's
annual shareholder's meeting in Detroit next May 22.
The Project will seek to have the corporation include three
shareholder resolutions in the proxy statement to be sent to GM.
stockholders.
* * *
ITALY'S Christian Democratic government resigned, plung-
ing the nation into a governmental crisis.
The minority government of Premier Marinao Rumor was formed
six months ago after a split in the Socialist party broke up the ruling
coalition. Rumor's government was to rule until a majority alliance
could be formed again.
However, prior to his resignation yesterday Rumor said that a
minority cannot cope with Italy's rising wave of strikes and student
disorders.
Rumor will remaingat the head of a caretaker regime until a new
government can be formed. Barring new parliamentary elections, a
coalition is likely to be put together, and Rumor is expected to be
named premier of the new alliance.

-Associated Press
Italian government falls
Italian Premier Mariano Rumor leaves his Rome office to inform President Giuseppe Saragat that
his all-Christian Democrat government has resigned. Rumor's government was Italy's thirtieth
since World War II.
POPULA TION CONTROL:
ENACTbaecks abortion reform

D.A. rests
in trial Of
'Chicago 7,'
CHICAGO (W) - The govern-
ment rested its case yesterday in
the trial of seven men charged
wi th conspiracy to incite riots
during the 1968 Democratic Na-,
tional Convention.
Judge Julius J. Hoffman first
denied and later granted a de-
fense motion for an early recess
in the U.S. District Court trial to
allow time for lawyers to produce
witnesses and documents for the
surrebutal.
The judge refused to recess the
trial before its usual 4:30 p.m.
CST closing time and t o 1 d the
lawyer, "You are asking me to re-
cess with no adequate showing."
The government, which origi-
nally h a d objected to a recess,
then withdrew its objection to the
delay and said it would prefer
that one of the witnesses, a tele-
vision cameraman, be given time
to appear. The cameraman was
expected to view a film of con-
vention week violence before the
start of trial tomorrow to deter-
mine if he was the cameraman
who photographed it.
Thomas A. Foran, U.S. district
attorney, asked that the judge
grant the recess and allow the
cameraman to view the film so
there would be no basis for "the
constant attempt by the defense
to make the appearance of repres-
siveness."
Judge Hoffman accepted For-
an's suggestion and was in the
process of instructing defense and
government attorneys to reach an
agreement on the matter when
someone at the defense table
laughed.
"The defense motion will be de-
nied," said the judge. "I was being
sneered at at that table."
Kunstler argued that the legal-
ity of the motion was of greater
import than the judge's concern
over "a modicum of respect."
"I haven't even had a modi-
cum," interrupted the judge. "I
don't want to discuss the matter
any further," he continued.
After the defense completes its
surrebuttal case next week, de-
fense and government lawyers will
confer on guidelines for closing
arguments.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.Q0 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

By SUSAN LINDEN
The Environmental Action for
Survival (ENACT) steering com-
mittee has endorsed legalized
abortion and urged federal and
state government to insure the
availability of contraceptive de-
vices.
In a resolution passed 7-3
Thursday, the group said "we
believe that any woman should
have the right to seek and ob-
tain an abortion under quali-
fied medical supervision cif she
feels strongly that, either for
personal, economic or social
reasons, she is incapable of giv-
ing a decent education and en-

vironment to a child she has
conceived.
"History has shown that laws
which condemn women to com-
pulsory pregnancy merely serve
to endanger the health and even
the lives of countless women
who, out of desperation, accept
abortions from any source avail-
able. This pattern is particularly
true of poorer women who can-
not afford to seek illegal abor-
tions from qualified physicians
nor the expense of airline tickets<
to places with more tolerant
laws.
"Countries with a fairly long
experience in the field of legal-
+ ized abortion have proved that
legal abortions performed in
good conditions have a risk of
maternal mortality many times
less than the simple risk of
childbirth in the United States,"
the resolution continued.

-- --

Try Daily Classifieds

t

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. F 0 r more informa-
ti In, phone 764-9270.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8
Day Calendar1
Degree Recital: Irene Btychcin, clar-
inet: School of Music Recital Hall,
4:30 p.m.
International Center Film Series:
Why Man Creates, Disneyland, U.S.A.,
and East Germany: Land Beyond the
Wall, International Center, 7:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Linda Oakley, so-
prano: School of Music Recital Hall,
8:00 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: Louis Falco
Dance Company: An evening of mo-
dern dance, electronic music and lights:
Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
U. of M. Senate Assembly: Agenda:
Minutes, Report of SACUA Activities,
Report of Calendar Comm.; Rackham
Amphitheater, 3:15 p.m.

Professional Theatre Program (Phoen-
ix Theatre): Helen Hayes and James
Stewart in Harvey: Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
Choral Union Series: Vladimir Ash-
kenazy, pianist: Hill Auditorium, 8:30
p.m.
General Notices
The Graduate School has been in-
formed by Inst. of International Educ
that Fulbright-Hays awards to the fol-
lowing countries have unexpectedly be-
eome available for academic year 1970-
1971: Greece, 1 award; Malaysia, 1
award; The Netherlands, 1 award (lim-
ited to candidates holding a Master's
)egree who wish to pursue a project
in Netherlandic studies). Any graduat.
ing senior or graduate student inter-
ested in applying, contact the Grad.
uate School Fellowship Office, 1012
(Continued on Page 2)

s
t
-Z

Steering committee member
Bill Manning felt the whole
question is particularly delicate.
"To be very honest," Manning
said, "we as individuals of
ENACT differ strongly in philo-
sophy on abortion, but as a
group representitng ENACT, we
feel quite strongly that a writ-
ten stand is very necessary, and
as group we would back it
(legalized abortion) 100 per
cent.
Group to meet
on abortion
A Women's Liberation abortion
action group will meet this after-
noon to organize long range abor-
tion reform plans.
- The plans include an education
campaign, a counseling and re-
ferral service for women seeking
abortions, and a program to raise
political support for the legaliza-
tion of abortion.
An ad hoc committee of the
action group will also be formed to
plan demonstrations during the
state Senate abortion hearings in
Detroit on Feb. 27.
Today's meeting will be at 2
p.m. at Guild House.

Although steering committee
members pledged to support the
resolution, s o m e individuals
feared it would cause a loss of
community support for ENACT.
"Inevitably we are going to
shock certain people," said
ENACT population committee
chairman Pierre Pradervand, "If
we're for population control,
there's no reason to be opposed
to abortion-if we consider it to
be important for social and med-
ical reasons."

The Outspoken Leader of the Repubican
Right in Michigan-Direct from the 14th
Congressional District:
R chard Durant
(WILL HE CHALLENGE
MILLIKEN IN THE PRIMARY?)
SPEAKS:

I

DR. DAVID BINGHAM is currently testify-
ing in Lansing in favor of liberalizing abor-
tion laws. He will discuss
THE DILEMA OF
ABORTION
WITH
RABBI JAMES GORDAN, Oak Woods
Sons of Abraham (Oak Park)
REV. ERWIN A. GAEDE, Minister, First
Unitarian Church
FR. GERALD J. HUGHES, S.J., Ph.D.
candidate in Philsophy
DR. DAVID B INGHAM, Obst./Gyn.,

Imrr~

DIAL
8-64 16

A Great Screen Classic Returns
V\V\EN LEIGH
and MARLON BRANDO
in TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
PJC, "ASTREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"
Screen Play by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS " Based upon the Original Play"A Streetcar Named Desire" by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
A Presented on t e Stage by Irene Mayer Selnick. Dected by EL1 A KAZAN Re-released thru
United APists

i

"Education Reform:
Disaster or Progress "
TUESDAY, FEB. 10
7:30 P.M.

I

VA

HELD OVER
3rd WEEK!

NO 2-6264 SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
The Most Explosive Spy Scandal of the Century!
7 7 2 . 'iimil

I

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