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January 09, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-09

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 9, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 9, 1970

BIG 10 B-BALL

TEXTBOOKS
UP TO VOFF
U LB; ICII'S
The Student's Bookstore

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-I

GRADUATE ASSEMBLY
WILL HOLD
ELECTION OF NEW OFFICERS
ON JANUARY 28, 1970
Any Graduate or Professional Student may have his
name placed in nomination by contacting a G.A.
representative, attending the January 14 meeting,
or contacting the Nominations Committee (764-
4219). Nominees may address the January 14 meet-
ing if they desire to do so. (No campus-wide cam-
paigns will take place since only the G.A. representa-
tives vote in the election.)
Nominations Meeting-January 14
Election Meeting-January 28
Place of Meeting: West Conference Room, Rackham
-READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS-

By ELLIOTT LEGOW
Led by All-American guard Rick
Mount, the Purdue Boilermakers
ran away with the Big Ten bas-
ketball crown last year. But des-
pite Mount's presence again this
year, the NCAA runner-up Boiler-
makers are not considered s u r e
things in the 1970 Big Ten cage
race.
Illinois and Ohio State rate as
prime contenders with Purdue for
the first place finish and a spot
in the NCAA tournament. Iowa,
which upset Purdue in the first
week of Big Ten play, is regard-
ed as a dark-horse threat.
The Boilermakers have been
put in the favorite's role this sea-
son primarily on the basis of their
first place finish last year, and
because of Mount. Purdue went
13-1 in onference games last year
and ma e it to the finals of the
NCAA tournament before being
ousted by Lew Alcindor and UCLA.
Mount, who set a Big Ten re-
cord with a 35.2 per game scor-
ing average last season, will have
to carry even more of the load
this year. Purdue's number two
and three scorers from last year's
quintet, Herm Gilliam and Bill
Keller, have graduated. Keller

and Gilliam also were strong on
defense, a quality Mount lacks.
Tyrone Bedford and Larry
Weatherford, who performed well
as substitutes. last season will
try to fill the vacated positions.
However, Boilermaker c o a c h
George King has already had
problems with Weatherford. Wea-
therford was suspended, along
with center Bill Franklin, f r o m
the Iowa game last weekend as
the result of curfew violations.
If the Boilermakers do falter,
Ohio State or Illinois could wind
up on top of the Big Ten. Illinois'
hopes rest primarily ontthe per-
formances of 6-8 center Greg
Jacksonand guard Mike Price.
Jackson is a big center at 2 5 5
pounds and provides the Illini
with strong rebounding. He is also
Illinois' leading scorer and will
have to make up for the departure
of ,llini star forward D a v e
Scholz.
Price leads the tight Illinois de-
fense and also provides a reliable
outside shot. The Illini often em-
ploy a zone defense and are skill-
ed at preventing the opposition
from penetrating near the basket.
And with Jackson guarding the
inside, scoring on Illinois will re-
main difficult.
Ohio State is led by two star
front courtment, senior D a v e
Sorenson and junior Jim Cleam-
ons. Sorensen is an agressive cent-
er who averaged 23 points last
year and leads the Buckeyes insre-
bounding.
Cleamons is developing into a
real star. As a sophomore, he was
the Bucks' second highest scorer
and rebounder and is coming on
stronger this year. Cleamons has
a good outside shot and also pro-
vides the Buckeyes with speed.
Ohio State can be expected to
use a running offense and the in-
side play of Sorenson to build a
contending team.
Iowa's outside chances are al-
ready improving as the Hawk-
eyes stand 2-0 in their first week
of conference play. The highlight
of that week was' the Hawks' up-
set of Purdue.
There is no one Hawkeye star,
but coach Ralph Miller has sev-
eral high scorers in his starting
quintet. In Iowa's 107-99 victory
over Michigan, three Hawkeyes
netted over 20 points. Forward
John Johnson led with 34, and
guards Chad Calabria and Fred
Brown showed the Hawkeyes' out-
side power by chipping in 24 and
23 respectively.
If the Hawkeyes are to take it
all, however, they will need more
nights when they shoot 63 percent
and more victories over contend-
ing teams.

MARK HENRY (23) putting the spin on his jump shot in a
victory over Marquette at the Events Building. Warriors' center
Ric Cobb (51) gazes at basket in anticipation of a rebound., Dean
Meminger (14) also is in position.

The rest of the Big Ten cage
lineup is a rather uninspiring lot.
If some potential stars blossom,
other Big Ten teams may be heard
from.
Indiana is relying on newcom-
ers Bubbles Harris and Joby
Wright. Dale Kelley is N o r t h-
western's main cog, while Minne-C

sota boasts Larry Mikon and Eric
Hill.
Right now, its still Rick Mount
against the field, but the Boiler-
makers will have their hands full
and could'see the Big Ten crown
flee to Columbus, - Champagne, or
Iowa City.

I

..:...........

Big Ten Standings
LAST YEAR'S FINAL RESULTS

gI

Purdue
Illinois
Ohio State
Michigan
Michigan State
Minnesota
Northwestern
Iowa,
Wisconsin
Indiana

I

Conference
W L
13 1
9 5
9 5
7 7

6
6
6
5
4

8
8
8
9
9
10

Pct.
.929
.643
.643
.500
.429
.429
.429
.357
.357
.286

All Games
W L 7
23. 4
19 5
17 7
13 11
11 12
12 12
14 10
12 12
11 13
9 15

Pct.
.821
.792
.708
.542
.478
.500
.583
.500
.458
.375

Against
he Wail
The NCAA and the blacks:
reaction and backlash
By ERIC SIEGEL
THE NATIONAL Collegiate Athletic Association has responded
to the recent demands of black athletes at several univer-
sities in much the same manner that George Wallace responds
to the demands of black people throughout the country-with
a mixture of unsubstantiated allegations and insidious half-
truths and innuendos.
The NCAA's response came in the December, 1969 issue of
the NCAA News, the publicity and informational organ of this
intercollegiate group.
In an article entitled "Militant Groups Doing Great Dis-
service to Black College Athletes," a collection of News staff
writers, sounding 'very much like Spio Agnew's speechwriting
team, bandied about such terms as "hard-core revolutionary
force," "organized, outside pressure campaign," and "hard-core
insurrectionists" in an effort to explain protests last fall by
black athletes at the universities of Wyoming, Washington and
Indiana.
But the language, reactionary as it is, is probably the least
innocuous element of the whole article. Ignoring the complex
basis for social protest with one hand and hurling inflam-
matory and unsupportable charges with the other, the News
writers dismiss last year's Olympic Project for Human Rights
which led several blacks to boycott the Olympic games and two
others to stage a symbolic protest on the winner's stand, "as a
result of persuasion, coercion and threats of bodily harm to
loved ones."
THE ARTICLE THEN continues, "A similar, more drastic
program is evident in recent incidents involving black athletes
at various NCAA member institutions."
To support this contention, the article lumps the Black
Panthers, Students for a Democratic Society, the Student Non-
violent Co-ordinating Committee, the Peace and Freedom Party
and the Black Student Union together, seeing Communist in-
fluences as the common denominator in all these groups.
Halfway through the two-page "special feature," the News
writers discuss the incident at Wyoming last year, where four-
teen blacks were suspended from the football team by Coach
Lloyd Eaton when they expressed a desire to protest the rascist
policies of the Mormon Church in their game against Brigham
Young University.
The article contends that the dismissal of the athletes was
the result of "plans laid last summer" and an "outside agitator."
Up to this point, the article is filled with inaccuracies. For
example, it identifies Harry Edwards, the organizer of the
Olympic Project and a former professor at San Jose State Col-
lege, as a "Blank Panther leader identified with the BSU."
Edwards has never been, identified with either group.
THE SOURCES OF the article are also questionable. The
analysis is based on anonymous "NEWS interviews" and al-
legedly "reliable information." The authors would have one
believe that they used "a study of authoritative documents";
yet the only document cited is the hearings conducted this sum-
mer by the McClellan Committee-hearings that used question-
able procedures and reasoning to reach even more questionable
conclusions.
The article pretends to be a piece of reliable reporting, but
It is everything that reliable and responsible comment is not.
The factual inaccuracies and the questionability of the
sources are so blatant that they are easy to attack intelligently.
The tone of the article is equally blatant, but it is harder to
attack. The initial feeling is one of shock, disbelief, and outrage,
that makes intelligent comment difficult.
Marcus Plant, Michigan's faculty representative to the
NCAA, would not comment on the article, but for different rea-
sons. "I'd like to postpone comment for a month or so," Profes-
sor Plant said. "I've got a lot of things cooking and I'm on my
way to the NCAA convention (Jan. 12-14)."
Willie Black, however the Chancellor of the Black Students
Aliance at Wyoming, was quickly able to put the article into
perspective.
"THE WHOLE IMPLICATION thats there is a conspiracy
behind all this is utter foolishness," Black, whose name was
mentioned in the article in connection with the incident at
Wyoming, told me over the phone. "The NCAA is trying to ex-
plain something very complex in a very convenient way.
"To say that the athletes have been coerced into taking
action by black militants is ridiculous," Black continued. "They
(the athletes) have enough sense to know when they're being
oppressed That's like saying the Jews in Europe during World
War II needed an outside agitator to tell them they were being
oppressed by Hitler."

Black also responded to the charge in the NCAA article
that the similarity of the demands presented by black athletes
at several universities indicated that there was a conspiracy.
"The demands are structured the way they are because
the practice of rascism is structured," Black said.
Harry Edwards, quoted by Newsweek magazine, made the
same point. "Has it occurred to them that the demands are
that way because the mistreatment of black athletes is so
structured and repetitious?" Edwards asked.
Black had a two-pronged answer to the suggestion raised
in the article that "discouraging problems encountered by the
black athlete should and can be best resolved on a personal basis
within the existing framework of personnel and procedures."
"FIRST OF ALL," Black commented, "it's the existing
framework that's failing. The coaches and administrators just
aren't responding to the problems of the blacks.
"And secondly," Black added, "the athletes are being dis-
criminated against as group, so why shouldn't they respond as a
group?"
Given the reaction of the NCAA to the protests by black
athletes across the country, what can be done now?
To begin with, as Professor Plant pointed out, there is the
matter of the NCAA convention in Washington, which starts
in less than a week.
The convention will bring together representatives from
all over the country, and one of their chief orders of business
should be a repudiation of the News ,statement.
If the sentiment for such a repudiation is not strong enough,
those representatives who sense the fallacies and rascism of
the News article shold issue a statement of their own, deploring
the stand taken by the NCAA on the complex issue of the rights
of black athletes.
A protest by those representatives may be in order. Maybe
they should even bow their heads and raise their fists.

4

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"The

Times,

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