100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 04, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


the
news today
by T he Associated Press and college Press Service

Q

tx rt ttn

atttt

Department of lUrban Planning
presents
HANS BLUMENFELD
A TORONTO PLANNING CONSULTANT
LECTURE:
"THE TREND TO THE METROPOLIS"
Thursday, February 5
4 P.M.
A&D Auditorium

page three
Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

THE TRIAL of 13 Black Panthers on bomb-conspiracy Wednesday, February 4, 1970
charges was interrupted by fighting between the defendants and
court officers.
The 13 Panthers are being tried for conspiring to bomb a New
York City police station, railroad facilities, department stores, and
the Bronx Botanical Gardens.
The scuffle broke out when one Panther struck a court officer
as the defendants were being led to a detention area outside the '
courtroom. Two officers were injured but did not require hospitaliza-
tion>

C i

I

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

GOLDEN LION
AWARD
WINNER!

Yesterday's incident marked the third time in two days that the
Panther trial has been recessed.
LABOR SECRETARY George P. Schultz issued regulations
specifying requirements for federal contractors to follow to assure
equal employment opportunities.
The standards require contractors in non-construction fields to:
consider several factors in hiring, including the minority group
population of the area surrounding the particular facility and the
portion of minority group members in the total work force in the area.
The new regulations outlined by Schultz seek to increase the
number of minority group workers employed on jobs contracted by
the federal government.
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION is consulting with Britain,
France, and Israel on a reply to a Soviet niote on the growing
Arab-Israeli crisis which President Nixon received from Premier
Alexi Kosygin Saturday.
White House Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler refused.to disclose
the contents of the letter, but other sources reported the message
blamed the United States for Israel's extensive military strikes against
Egypt and other Arab countries and warned of an increase in Soviet
aid to the Arabs.
U.S. PLANES have made 41 retaliatory air attacks against
North Vietnam since former President Johnson ordered the bomb-
ing halted in November, 1968, a New York City radio. station
reported.,
The fighter-bombers were accompanying unarmed planes on
reconnaissance missions over North Vietnam, and had instructions
to attack only if the North Vietnamese fired first.
The latest raid occurred last Wednesday after North Vietnamese
I gunners shot down one U.S. fighter-bomber and one rescue helicopter.

-Associated Press

Strike econtinues

* THURSDAY *
"STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE"
by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
WINNER OF 5 ACADEMY AWARDS

Members of the local 301 of the International Union of Electrical Workers leave the state armory
in Schenectady, N.Y. yesterday after voting to reject the contract proposed to end the nationwide
General Electric strike. GE workers in Elmira, however, voted overwhelmingly to accept the contract.

Committee hears
pullout proposal
WASHINGTON (P) - Senate
critics of President Nixon's Viet-
nam policy accused the admin-
istration yesterday of creating a
national euphoria about the war.
The setting for a new assault
on U.S. war policy was a familiar
one, the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, which opened three
days of public hearings on a series
of resolutions proposing new U.S.
approaches.
The hearings are the first since
the administration's counterattack
in the wake of last fall's antiwar
protests brought it high ratings
in public opinion polls.
Fulbright expressed hope they
would lead to approval of a reso-
lution but said "It Is much too soon
to begin picking and choosing
among the various resolutions."
At the outset, the chairman read
a lengthy statement in which he
said an important question to be
answered by the hearings is "whe-
ther, all things considered, V i e t-
namization is the most promising
path toward peace, more promising
than a renewed effort to nego-
tiate a compromise settlement in
the Paris talks."
Fulbright said "Recent visitors
to Hanoi report that the National
Liberation Front and the North
Vietnamese would be prepared to
make significant concessions in re-
turn for our agreement to t h e
gradually, phased but complete
withdrawal of American forces
from Vietnam," adding that to
what extent a compromise┬░ is pos-
sible "can only be determined by
substantive negotiations."
Sen. Charles E. Goodell (R-NY),
charged "We have not Vietnam-
ized the war: we have cosmetized
it," adding that while "Vietnam-
ization is a great public relations
success, the real war--the war
going on there, in Vietnam-has
not been defused."
Qoodell proposed a resolution
that would have all U.S. troops,.
including support troops and ad-
visers, removed from Vietnam by
Dec. 1.
Such a plan, he said, would force
the Saigon regime to set its own
house in order and would bring
pressure on the North Vietnamese
to negotiate at Paris.

i

At KLH, we believe that music
often leaves you no choice but to listen.

Sel
a
POT
in Daily
Classifieds

LUNCHEON ADDRESS:
Student blasts Nigerian policy,
contends Ibo unity still strong

By LARRY LEMPERT
The Biafran sense of national
identity is still strong, according
to Alozie Wachuku, secretary of
the Biafran Student Association.
Wachuku a graduate student in
political science, spoke yesterday
at a luncheon sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center.
"Biafra is no longer an inde-
pendent nation," Wachuku said,
bu t this e~a nt ha~u n

tional identity. There is no ques-
tion of surrender; the struggle
continues. I would not Like to
speculate on what form it will
take."
"We sought to formalize a sit-
uation that existed before," he
said. "We were a nation. We want-
ed to provide that nation with a'
government, to proclaim to the
world 'we are.' We were asserting

'RUt s n c iut. S u~e tu ag ur na- the ideendence Or an African
r---m--mi- -M---- m---m-m-----m-mm-- --m m ------people.'
i Now Biafra is a colony, Wachu-
U Please Rush Me u ku added. "Nigeria has introduced
The uesionnire& Diectonscolonialism .and imperialism. They
S The Questionnaire & Directions will appointa colonial adminis-
* For CUPID COMPUTER; trator, and we will ?egard him as
of such. Under this colonial rule, the
U. of M.'s Computer Biafran people will endure humil-
Dating Service Dat I iation -if we must."
DaigSrieWachuku said he regards talk
I understand that I am under no obligation to join. of a Nigerian nation as "prepos-
terous." The original i d e a, he
NAME ."...............said, was a "multi-national struc-
: ture, a cooperation of various peo-
ADDRESS ... ples alloving each entity to de-
'1 : velop on its own. The important
. ....ideas were self-determination and
S ..... .security."
CUPID COMPUTER The' Nigerians and the Biafrans
E .Ihave only one main thing in com-
Box 67 Imon, Wachuku said. "We are all
MD-A Champaign, I11. 61820 * various shades of black."
. .----- -i ----............, ......... . ."But many things divide us,"
___ __ _ _ mn m m he continued. There are 250 dif-
ferent languages. Northern Ni-
geria maintains contact with the
Moslem Arab world, while Biaf-
AN N A R BO R'S rans are Christians. The society
of the North is ascriptive; Biafran
BRIGHT EST society is achievement oriented."
::: Wachuku outlined three ques-

tions of importance for the future
of the Biafran people.
First, Wachuku questioned,
what will happen to the "tenuous
alliance formulated between the
ethnic groups of Nigeria" if the
"element of hatred" for the Ibos
of Biafra is removed. A second
important factor is how the Brit-
ish and Russians will "share the
booty," he said.
And Wachuku also pointed to
the potential long-range effects of
the brutality endured by the Bi-
afrans throughout the war. "How
does a man feel, Wachuku asked,
"when he sees his daughter or his.
wife abducted and raped by sold-
iers?"
Wachuku estimated two million
Biafrans died from starvation
during the war with Nigeria.
"Don't ask me to justify the
deaths of those people," he said.
"Ask those who destroyed them."

SMVC plans ,conference
on national spring action

The National Student Anti-war
Conference is meeting in Cleve-
land Feb. 14 and 15 to form plans
for massive antiwar demonstra-
tions this spring.
Representatives from the major
branches of Student Mobilization
Committee to End the War in!
Vietnam (SMC) have made pro-
posals concerning the spring of-

lames Goodfriend Collection

N IGHTSPOT

=

. . . . . . . ..*........,...*~. .. *.'.... . .* .* *. .* .*. I S

i

i

MAKERS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE STEREO EQUIPMENT

DON BAILEY

i
the
.
.rSO 7.9.. 1tat 1n..trbar
7b9-40b0 2200 Fuller Rd.

I

Crative Arts Festivral 191 0
PRESENTING: SUN. NITE, FEB. 8
The Incomparable
LOUIS FALCO & FEATURED DANCERS
"THE RUDOLPH NUREYEV OF MODERN DANCE"
Modern Dance, Electronic Music, Lights

fensive and will be at the con-
ference to decide on a final plan.
Debby 'Bustin, chairman of Ann
Arbor's SMC, said the conference
would probably decide on some
sort of decentralized action be-
cause "there are too many people
against the war now to be able to
bring them all to one place."
"Even with the Nov. 15 demon-
stration in Washington,'there were
problems," Mrs. Bustin s a I d.
"Many people who wanted to go
couldn't because transportation ar-
rangements were cancelled a n d
there were inadequate housing fa-
cilities."
Although the conferenceuhas
been called by SMC, Mrs. Bustin
emphasized the conference and the
antiwar movement are not solely
student actions..
The two-day conference will also
offer informal workshops on other
political issues such as workers'
rights, women's liberation, a n d
Third World oppression.
The Ann Arbor SMC meets to-
night at 7:30 in the Assembly
Room of the Union to organize
persons who are interested in at-
tending the national conference.
The meeting will organize trans-
portation to Cleveland and hous-
ing arrangements.

$2.75

A.M.-4 P.M.; Sat. 1-3 P.M.

I

x

THE MODEL SIX was the first full-range loud-
speaker designed and built entirely by KLH. It
probably sounds better on a wider Variety of program
material than any other speaker in the world.

WEDNESDAY-FEB. 4
Sam1Uel Fuller Festival
in Architecture Aud:
7: "THE STEEL HELMET" (Don't miss
this one)
9: "SHOCK CORRIDOR"
__ A ..1 A .

iyy

Hi-Fi Headquarters in Ann Arbor
if . __r

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan