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February 03, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

y 3, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Agains
By ERIC SIEGEL
A BRIEF ITEM came over our Associated Press wire early
yesterday morning, announcing that Joe Frazier and Jimmy
Ellis, who will meet in Madison Square Garden in two weeks for
the world heavyweight boxing crown, would box with their
sparring partners and then go a few rounds with some members
of Congress on Capitol Hill sometime during the afternoon.
A few hours later, we received a longer AP story, this one
saying that the exhibitions had been cancelled because no loca-
tion could be found for the bouts.
But although the matches never materialized, the whole in-
cident ca only be viewed as a definite plus by the promoters of
the Feb. 16 championship fight. The novel-or, as the AP called
it, 'extraordinary"-idea for an exhibition added a touch of
4 color to what has been shaping up as an incredibly dull heavy.
weight match.
In fact, the idea for the exhibitions was actually the joint
branstorm of Garden publicity man John Condon and his friend
on Capitol Hill, New York Republican Martin McKneally
McKneally had even arranged for some of his more athletically-
minded colleagues to step into the ring against Frazier and Ellis
CONDON, HOWEVER, should not feel too good about the
attendant publicity given to the proposed exhibition. In a way
the whole incident, instead of stirring up enthusiasm for a
championship event, actually seemed to trumpet the last hurrah
of the sport itself.
That sport whose every move was once "instant copy"
should have to resort to games and gimmicks to achieve even
some token interest cannot be viewed as an encouraging devel-
opment by those who follow the sport.
There was a time, not too long ago, that any item about
a championship bout would have been the lead story on every
sports page across the country.
THE DECLINE OF interest in boxing should be even more
disturbing to the proponents and promoters of the sport in
view of the fact that during the same period of time, spectator
interest in every other sport, from dog racing to golf to pro foot-
ball, was multiplying many times over.
For those who desire some sort of cause and effect relation-
ship, the demise of the sport of boxing seems to be directly
traceable to a decision of the National Boxing Association late
in 1965. In that year, the NBA stripped Ali of his boxing crown
for his protests against the war in Vietnam and his refusal to
be inducted into the armed services.
The story of Ali is, however, old hat, and need not be be-
labored here. Suffice it to say that with that one bold stroke, the
NBA successfully kay-oed a growing national interest in a man
who was also a professional boxer.
To be sure, Ali was arrogant and boastful, but that ar-
rogance and braggadocia were just parts to a whole man who,
if he did not always endear himself to the public, always cap-
tured their interest. Ali had color, in the ring and out of it, and
even now, three years after he threw his last punch, he can
still command more attention by blowing his nose out loud that
Ellis and Frazier can get boxing or not boxing, on the floor of
4 the Capitol;
INDEED, ALI PROVED he had more class than anyone in
the ring today when he offered a while ago to give his cham-
pionship belt to the winner of the Frazier-Ellis fight to "keep
boxing legal and keep it going."
This out-of-the-ring pronouncement of Ali's had that cer-
tain element of class that has been so much a part of him ever
since he stepped into the national limelight before his first fight
with Sonny Liston more than six years ago.
Unfortunately for boxing, this pronouncement will not save
the sport from cancer of disinterest that has been apparent ever
since Ali was stripped of his crown and forbidden to box in
several states.
Indeed, nothing may be able to save the sport, with its in-
herent and often abhorrent violence and its mob-control. But
if anything can save the sport, it is a man in the mold of Ali, a
man with color and personality.
So take note, Ellis and Frazier. Your sideshows might be
fun for some people, but in the end they're laughing at you, not
with you.

Maravich

hits

3000th

Page Seven
point

career

By The Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. - Pete
Maravich soared past the 3,000-
point mark here last night with a
49-point performance which led
Louisiana State to a, 109-91 South-
eastern Conference basketball vic-
tory over Mississippi State.
A free throw with 7:17 left in
the first half gave Maravich his
3,00th career point. Last Satur-
day he became college basket-
ball's all-time leading scorer as,
he shattered Oscar Robertson's.
total for 88 games.
Pete's total last night gave him
3,036 points. He has 12 games left.
He hit on 21 of 40 from the floor
and sank 7-of-9 from the free
throw line. He also had nine
assists.
The Tigers, boosting their SEC
record to 5-2, broke open a tight
ball game halfway through the
first half and went on to a 55-41
intermission lead.
After the half, the Tigers had,
20-point cushions on several oc-
casions but Mississippi State start-
ed to wuhittle away at the LSUT lead
as time ran out.
* * *

dail
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHRIS TERAS
jumper from the side had given
Auburn a one-point lead with 28
seconds left, setting up Mills' win-
ning basket.
Harris missed an 18-footer at
the horn.
jacksonvi le romps
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-The na-
tion's leading rebounder, 7-foot-2
Artis Gilmore, dominated the
boards and baskets in leading
sixth-ranked Jacksonville to a
110-75 victory over Iona in college
basketball last night.
The young giant grabbed 26 re-
bounds, one above his average,
and scored 29 points against the
zone defense that surrounded him
but couldn't cover him over the j
top.
High-leaping Gilmore even be-
came a ball stealer and first man
down the floor on the fast break
as the rout developed in the sec-
and half.
It was a typical Jacksonville
victory-a100-point plus scoring
performance for the 12th time in
16 games and such supremacy that
there was no doubt of the outcome
by halftime.

Iovagridders seek tansfer;
Halls of fame admit members
By The Associated Press
* IOWA CITY - It was reported yesterday that sophomore
fullback Tom Smith and quarterback Larry Lawrence are seeking
to transfer from Iowa to Arizona.
Arizona Coach Bob Weber said yesterday, however, that he did
not encourage transfers, and that he did not expect the two Hawk-
eyes to be playing for Arizona.
This is the latest in a series of incidents reflecting discontent
in the Iowa football program.
* NEW YORK - Ford C. Frick, the former commissioner, and
a °couple of players who sparkled in baseball's spotlight four decades
ago have been elected to the Hall of Fame.
The ex-players are center fielder Earle Combs of the New York
Yankees and ,knuckleball pitcher Jesse "Pop" Haines, of the St. Louis
Cardinals.
The three, all in their 70s, were elected to the Hall Sunday by the
Old Timers Selection Committee.
* * *
! CANTON, Ohio - Hugh McElhenny, Tom Fears, Pete Pihos and
Jack Christiansen, four stars of the 1950s, have been elected to the
Professional Football Hall of Fame.
Dick Gallagher, director of the Hall of Fame, announced yester-
day the result' of the voting by a board of selectors from pro football
cities who met in New Orleans the day after the Super Bowl.
The four new members will be inducted formally in ceremonies
Aug. 8 in Canton after which the New Orleans Saints, coached by
Fears, will play the Minnesota Vikings in the annual Hall of Game
preseason dame.
* * *
" MILWAUJEE, Wis. - Henry Jordan, a four-time all-pro as a
defensive tackle for the Green Bay Packers, said yesterday he was
retiring from football to become an executive in promotional work.
The 35-year-old Jordan, who missed much of last season with
a back injury, was named an executive sales director for the Milwaukee
World Festival Corporation.

Kentucky nips
AUBURN, Ga.-Terry Mills' 25-
foot field goal with 11 seconds
remaining gave second - ranked
Kentucky an 84-83 victory over
Auburn last night in a Southeast-
ern Conference basketball game.
The victory moved Kentucky in-
to a tie with Georgia for first
place in the SEC.
Mills, who missed the first shots
on two one-and-one free throw
attempts in the final minute, had
put the Wildcats ahead, 82-80,
with a 25-foot set shot with 1:50
remaining.I
But a free throw by Al Lea-
pheart and Henry Harris' 12-foot
Scores
\ COLLEGE BASKETBALL RESULTS
Kentucky 84, Auburn 83
Jacksonville 110, Iona 75
Missouri 90, Colorado 73
Kansas State 82, Iowa State 64
Kansas 78, Oklahoma 41
Indiana State 82, So. Illinois 73
Loyola (Chicago) 83, Valparaiso 67
Eastern Kentucky 96, Canisius 67
Pennsylvania 57, columbia 52
Mich. Tech 96, L. Superior St. 92

-Associated Press
LSU'S PISTOL PETE MARAVICIT scores a basket last night,
leading up to his 3000th career point. He is the first collegian
ever to pass the 3000 mark. Maravich scored 49r points in the game,
which LSU won, 109-91 over Mississippi State, at Baton Rouge, La.

NBA TRADES:
1eat ytraded; Oscar remains

Orr leads

CINCINNATI (IP)--As the Nation-
al Basketball Association trading
deadline passed Sunday night, the
big news concerned one trade that
did not take place and another
that did involving a player that
isn't playing.
Despite efforts to deal him to
Baltimore, Oscar Robertson is still
a member of the Cincinnati Roy-
als. Joe Axelson, general manager

of the Royals, said he heard noth- mand for a $700,000 three-year,
ing more from Baltimore. I no-cut contract.

He said, however, he was t o i
the Bullets officials talked w i t h
Robertson again Sunday "but ap-
parently nothing happened."
The Royals and the Bullets had
cooked up a trade of Robertson
for Baltimore's Gus Johnson. But
Robertson thwarted the deal after
Baltimore refused to meet his de-

MID-AMERICAN CONFER
Conference
W L Pct. 'W

Ohio U
B. Green
Miami
Toledo
W. Mich.
Kent St.
Kan. St.
Missouri
Nebraska
Kansas
Iowa St.
Colorado
Oklahoa
Okla. St.
Drake
Louisville
N. Texas
Cincinnat
Tulsa
Bradley
St. Louis
Memphis
Wichita
Utah
UTEP
'wyoming
Arizona
New Mex
Colorado
Arizonac
B. Young

BI

5 1 .833 1
4 1 .800 1
4 2 .666 1
4 3 .571 1
2 4 .333
0 7 .000
3IG EIGHT
5' 1 1.000 1
3 2 .600 1
2 2 .500 1
2 2 .500 1
3 3 .500 1
2 3 .400
1 3 .250 1
1 4 .200
** * *

College Basketball Standings
ENCE USF 3 1 .750 9 6 .600 Houston
All games Pep'dne 3 2 .600 9 7 .563 Niagara
V L pct. Loyola 2 2 .500 7 8 .467 Utah Stat
.3 3 .812 Nvda LV 1 3 .250 9 6 .600 Holy Cross
0 5 .666 Nev. Rno 0 3 .000 3 7 .300 Army
.0 6 .625 St. Marys 0 4 .000 3 11 .250 Notre Dan
2 4 .750'. * * * illanova
5 11 .312 IVY LEAGUE Syracuse
3 12 .200 Penn 5 0 1.000 16 1 .941 Dayton
Columbia 5 0 1.000 14 2 .875 Georgia T
Yale 4 2 .66'7 8 $ .500' Duquesne
4 3 .824 Princeton 3 3 .500 10 7 .588 DePaul
1 6 .647 Dartmouth 3 3 .500 9 8 .529 St. John's
1 4 .733 Harvard 1 5 .167 7 11 .389 Air Force
1 5 .688 Cornell 1 5 .167 4 11 .267 NYU
0 8 .583 Brown 1 5 .167 4 12 .250 Chi - Loy
9 8 .529 * * * * Providence
2 '4 .750 ATLANTIC COAST Seattle
0 7 .588 S. Car. 7 0 1.000 14 1 .938 Penn Stai

e
.ss
me
ech
s, N.Y.
.e
tte

14
14
13
13
12
12
12
9
l
11
9
10
10
8
8
10

3
3
3
4
4
5
5
4
5
6
5
6
6
6
7
7
8

.824
.824
.813
.765
.750
.706
.706
.692
.688
.647
.643
.625
.625
.571
.571
.563
.563
.556
.533
.526
.474
.471
.471
.471
.429
.412
.400
.385
.375
.375
.333
.278
.188

A clause in Robertson's c o n
tract with Cincinnati gives him the
right to refuse to be traded. The
Bullets offered him a $350,000 two-
year contract. He is now paid
$125,000 in a contract that expires
after this year.
The biggest trade Sunday sent
Atlanta Hawks' center Zelmo Bea-
ty to the San Francisco Warrior
for a player, or players, to be
named after the season.
Beaty, who is 6 feet 9 and weighs
235 pounds, has been sitting .out
his option year with the Hawks
after seven seasons with them in
St. Louis and Atlanta. He h a s
signed -a four-year $500,000 con-
tract with the Los Angeles Stars of
the American Basketball Associa-
tion to begin next year.
A courtroom battle over Beaty
is expected. The Hawks had filed
a $4.5 million dollar suit against
the Stars. San Francisco is al-
ready in a legal fight with the
ABA's Washington Caps over Rick
Barry..

Boston defenseman Bobby Orr
increased his lead in the National
Hockey League scoring race with
nine points in three games 1 a s t
week. Orr is bidding to become
the first defenseman ever to win
the NHL scoring title.
SCORING. LEADERS
G A Pts.
1. Orr, Bos. 17 60 77
2.' Esposito, Bos. 29 35 64
3. Tkaczuk, N.Y. 23 36 59
4. Goyette, St. L. 20 35 55
5. Mikita, Chi. 27 25 52
Salon, N.Y. 21 31 52
7. Ratelle, N.Y. 22 27 49
8. Lemaire, Mtl. 28 20 48
9. Bucyk, Bos. 22 24 46
10. Xaousseau, Mtl 18 26 44

The University of Michigan
Center for Russian and East European Studies
A TTENTION!
Special meeting for under grads
interested in a BA degree in
Russian and East European Studies

i

Professional Standings

34
4

I

NBA
Eastern Division
W L
New York 46 11
Milwaukee 39 18
Baltimore 35 22
Philadelphia 29 27.
Cincinnati 26' 32
Boston 22 33.
Detroit 21 37
Western Division
Los Angeles 30 24.
Atlanta 32 26"
Chicago 26 32
San Francisco 24 31
phoenix 25 33
Seattle 21 35.
San Diego 19 34
Yesterday's Results
Atlanta 125, Detroit 121
ABA
Eastern Division
w I.
Indiana 38 10
Kentucky 29 20.
Carolina 23 25
New York 23; 31
Pittsburgh 18 31
Miami 14 36
Western Division
New Orleans 27 20
Denver 28 23

P
Y

Pct. GB
.807 -
.684 7
.614 11
.518 16%
.448 20 /
.400 23
.362 25%
.556 -
.553 -
.448 6
.436 6 z
.431 7
.375 10
.358 10
Pct. GB
.792
.592 9
.479 14%
.426 17
.367 20/
.280 24
.574 -
.549 1

Dallas 25 25 .500
Washington= 23 24 .489
Los Angeles 23 26 .469
Yesterday's Games
Denver 115, Los Angeles 113
New Orleans vs. Washington at
Wichita, Kan., Inc.
NHL

MISSOURI VALLEY
9 0 1.000 15 4
6 1 .857 11 4
5 2 .714 11 5
i 5 3 .625 13 4
4 4 .50011 7
3 5 .375 10 8
2 7 .222 5 11
1 7 .125 6 12
1 7 .125 5 12
S * * *
WAC
6 01.00014 4
4 2 .667 11 5
4 2 .667 13 4
4 2 .667 810
ico 2 4 .333 7 10
State 1 5 .167 8 7
St. 2 4 .333 413
1 5 .167, 5 12
* * * *
PACIFIC 8
4 0 1.000 16 0
rnia 4 0 1.000 13 3
oon 3 2 .60013 4
t. 2 2 .500 8 8
on St. 2 3 .400 12 5
1 3 .250 9 6
a1 4 .200 710
1 4 .200 4 12

N. C.
N. CaY
.789 W. Fo
.733 Duke
.688 Maryla
.765 Ciems
.611 Virgin
.583
.313
.333 Davidc
.294 E. Ca
G. W
W &2
.823 Furma
.688 Citade
.765 VMI
.444 I Richm
.412
.533
.235 Georg
.294 Kentu

St.
r.
rest
and
on
ia

5 1 .833 15 1
5 2 .714 13 3
4 3 .571 10 6
2 4 .333 9 5
3 5 .375 10 7
1 4 .200 6 10
0 8 .000 610
* * * *

SOUTHERN CONFERE
son 7 0 1.000
r. 5 2 .714
ash. 4 2 .667
M 3 2 .600
an 2 4 .333
e 2 4 .333
1 5 .167
nond 1 6 .143
* * * *
SOUTHEASTERN
ia 8 1 .888
icky 7 1 .857
n 7 2 .777
4 2 .667
5 3 .625
3 5 .375
2 6 .250
a 2 6 .250
St. 1 7 .125
ma 1 7 .124

NCE
14 3
11 8
6 11
7 10
8 10
6 11
4 13
4 13

.933
.813
.625
.643
.588
.375
.375
.824
.579
.353
.412
.444
.353
.235
.235
.600
.937
.647
.667
.562
.466
.588
.312
.286
.250

La Salle~
Temple
Fordham
West Tex. St.
West Virginia
Pitt
Miami, Fla.
Virginia Tech
Rutgers
Boston Col.
Lafayette
Tulane
Detroit
Xavier, Ohio
Navy

8 7
10 9
9 10
8 9
8 9
8 9
6 8
7 10
6 9
5 8
6 10
6 10
5 10
5 13
3 13

Due to wishful thinking on the
part of the Daily staff, Thomp-
son's Pizza $1.00 off coupon
that appeared is an untruth and
hereby declared null and void.
Thompson's does still offer a
generous 50c off Mon.-Thurs.

JI

2 14 .125

Wednesday, February 4
4:10 P..
Room 1 (basement) Lane Hall
(Refreshments served)

CORRECTION:

on

1

r
-

New York
Montreal
Boston
Detroit
Chicago
Toronto
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Minnesota
Oakland
Los Angeles

East Division
W L Ti
28 10 10
26 11 11
26 11 11
25 14 7
24 17 6
19 20 8
West Division
24 16 7
S 12 20 17
14 25 8
10 23 14
12 29 8
9 33 5

Pt. GF GA

66 169 111
63 166 119
63 181 144
57 140 120
54 139 104
46 143 144
55 148 112
41 126 1451
36 106 153
34 133 161
32 104 164
23 103 181

UCLA
S. Califo
Washingt
Oregon St
Washingt
Oregon
Californ i
Stanford

1.000
.813
.765
.500
.706
.600
,412!
.250
.875
.813

Aubur
LSU .
Vand.
Miss.
Tenn.
Florid
Miss.!
Alaban

9
15
11
10
9
7
10
5
4
4

6
1
6
5
7
8
7
11
10
12

§ EN AND SOPHOMORES:

* * * *
WEST COAST
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
UOP 4 0 1.000 14 2
Sta. CIr. 3 1 .750 13 3

sMAJOR INDEPENDENTS
Jacksonville 14 1 .933
St. Bonaventure 13 1 .929
New Mex. St. 17 2 .895
Florida St. 16 2 .889
Marquette 14 2 .875

I

i

ANN ARBOR "BLUES"
Discover Exciting Ways to Beat the People Problem

i

..G<d1Q,
e '' 6
a ~i r

Attention: Students, Faculty, and Staff
1969-70 TEACHING FELLOW AWARDS
Nomination forms for DISTINGUISHED TEACHING FELLOW
AWARDS are available in Room 2248, Student Activities uild-
ing. The deadline for submission of forms has been extended to:
FEBRUARY 9, 1970
Nomination forms for 1970 DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS
FOR INSTRUCTORS, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS, AND JUNIOR
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS must be submitted no later than
MARCH 2, 1970
Submit nomination forms in triplicate to:

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* Salaried Cooperative Internships with Business
and Industry Mandatory for Graduation)
Cross Campus Transfer Available to All Qualified Students
Make a Date Now with Your Future.

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