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January 09, 1970 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-09

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday; January 9, 1970

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 9, 1970

Seattle Model Cities plan proves difficult

x

WASHINGTON UP) - Model
Cities, that oft-studied, sputter-
ing experiment in renewing the
poverty-torn hearts of 150 U.S.
cities, is inching off the ground
after more than two years of
planning, torrents of words and
tons of paperwork.
"Make It Fly" reads the black
and white Model Cities lapel
button worn in Seattle, Wash.,
which became the first city in
the nation to win a federal ap-
proval of its action plan.
But one year later, few peo-
ple in Seattle or in any of the
other 149 Model Cities are sure
the idea will ever reach f u 11
flight, even as the painfully con-
trived Model Cities machinery
begins to grind out programs.
"I'm not convinced this pro-
gram can work," said Walter
Hundley, Seattle's Model Cities
director. "But I am convinced
that what we -had going before
Model Cities didn't work."
By forcing coordinated plan-
ning, Model Cities attempts to
make the sometimes competing
arms of federal, state and local
bureaucracies w o r k together
toward common goals.
Residents of the Model Cities

neighborhoods, many of t h e m
scenes of racial rioting, are giv-
en a stake in the program on
the theory - established in the
antipoverty program - that the
community must have a voice in
decisions that affect its fate.
If it is to work, those close
to the program say, Model Cit-
ies needs time, a continuing flow
of money and clearcut and per-
sistent White House support.
The Nixon administration has
taken a cautious approach to
the program, a Johnson admin-
istration creation still in t h e
planning stage when the Re-
publicans took office.
"After freezing Model Cities
money for months, the Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban De-
velopment (HUD) began deal-
ing out program funds late last
spring.
Now, 56 cities, armed with fed-
eral block grants, have begun
whittling away at the priority
items in a five-year agenda
created not by federal govern-
ment but by the local M o d e 1
Cities machinery itself.
Housing development corpora-
tions are being formed. Neigh-
borhood health centers a r e

opening. Workers are looking
for high school dropouts and
persuading them to join exper-
imental schools like Seattle's
"Soul Academy."
The other 94 cities remain
either in the planning stage or
locked in one of the 1,001 pit-
falls that beset a program with
severe planning requirements,
including citizen participation
without citizen control.
The program's sophistication
is cited by critics, including some
in the upper reahes of govern-
ment, who say the program is
unrealistic and cannot work.
They say it not only requires
a deep pool of uncommon ad-
ministrative skill, but also co-
operation by scores of agencies
so encrusted in their bureaucra-
tic ways they could never be
made responsive to the special
needs of the model neighbor-
hoods.
Besides, the critics say, t h e
focus on neighborhoods w il l
generate political pressures to
expand the range of benefits
citywide, to the metropolitan re-
gions or eventually to all U.S.
cities. Costs, already uncertain,
could then become astronomical.
"The whole thing the skep-
how to decide you should follow. Se-
cond of four meetings. Primarily for
seniors and graduate students, but open
to all interested. Professor J. Q.
Young, January 12, 1970, 4:00 p.m. and
7:30 p.rA. in Room 325, West Engineer-
ig Building. (Afternoon and evening
meetinigs will be the same, }
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
The Ageless Science of Yoga. Asana
and Posture class sponsored by Self
Realization ; Fellowship, Mon. or Wed.,
8-9:00, call Linda or Dale, 761-9825 after
6:00.
Art Print Loans will be shown in
rc- ms 3529 and 3524. of the, Student
Activities Bulding, Jan. 12-16: Mon.,
5-7 p.m., Tues, 719, Wed., 4;30-7, Thurs.,
7-9, and Friday 4:30-7..
The Free University will soon be in
full swing.. If you would be interested.
in teaching or coordinating a class,
submit a paragraph describing t h e
course, with your name, address, and
telephone no. to the UAC offices. Re-
gistration will take place Jan. 23-31.
Info call Liz at 764-8865 or Dave at
764-9727.
holfandlOJ

tics lose sight of," said Robert
Baida, an assistant Model Cit-
ies administrator for HUD, "is
that the exact thing we are try-
ing to find out is whether it
will work or not."
"This is probably the 1 a s t
chance to prove the system can
change." The program is young,
but already "We certainly have
raised expectations on the part
of people," said Richard Lugar,
Indianapolis, Republic m a y o r.
"And they have to be met."
Meeting those expectations
will cost money. How much
money is one of the imponder-
ables of the Model Cities pro-
gram.
Created by Congress in 1966,
it won't be into full execution-
with all 150 cities operating pro-
grams-for at least another
year.
One HUD projection placed the
150-city five-year spending de-
mand at between $27 billion and
$56 billion.
But Model Cities is geared,
not to spending demands, but
to the amount available f o r
spending.
Besides, officials say, before
Model Cities no one knew just
how much money was actually.
going into the cities from the
welter of federal, state and local
sources.
In Seattle, for example, Hund-
ley expects to be spending close
to $10 million within the first
year of program operation, al-
though the city received only
$5.2 million in direct Model Cit-
ies money - the HUD supple-
mentary or block grant.
The balance will come from
state, local or private sources
and standard federal aid pro-
grams that did or could have
come to the city with or with-
out a Model Cities program.
So far HUD, which granted
$22 million to the cities f o r
planning, has spent about $300
million in supplementary funds
for the cities in operation.
Hundley and Model C i t i e s
took the lead in organizing the
black workers, then stepped in-
to the background and stayed
there, aloof from the+ confront-
"ations that followed.
"It's as plain as day," s a y s
black electrical contractor, Ty-
ree Scott. "We don't control
nothing out at the airport. We

don't control nothing down-
town. But we do control the turf
right here."
"If the problems can't be fixed
here, they can't be fixed any
place," Seattle argued in first
asking for inclusion in the pro-
gram.
Seattle is a lovely rolling city
tucked between the sea and the
mountains, even its poor neigh-
borhoods are laced with rose-
bushes and green lawns. Yet, all
the problems that afflict Cleve-
land, Detroit or New York are
beginning to afflict Seattle, al-
though on a lesser scale.
And most of those problems
are concentrated in the model
neighborhood - four s q u a r e
miles deliberatel shaped to in-
clude poor white as well as
Negro, Indian, and Oriental dis-
tricts.
Recently elected Mayor Wes
Uhlman believes Seattle has
gained a symbolic importance in
judging the progress of Model
Cities nationally.
"They're, the Nixon admin-
istration, is going to watch ourTA
program closer than the others,"
he said. "I suspect, if we suc-
ceed, it will be proof to them
that the program can work.'
- DINE-

ISED TEXTBOOKS

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" ,. .n. ', 14.? ', :": :.m::;i::: : ;,,:liil:2!!:";:._: D iv., h ere are some, come
through other.
TAILYi OFFICIAL Local Retail Store, sales
supervisory, BA pref., som
terest or background, and
for sales.
s r31::: + tic f : f :f $ . nLocal Company, asssistan
- ~ ig, retailing, and operatio
She Daily Official Bulletin isan pan, accounting exper. a
r- ferred, detail, accurate w
sftyof : flpublication of the oUniber Aetna Life and Casualty
sity of Michigan. Notices should be sionTn.isards y
sent In TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to soTn.i atod
m 358 P . A. l, befor tion by preference later,
2Bpom.,5of the dayprecdg ub-re all expenses paid, not sal
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for public relations post for
Saturday and Sunday. 'general ,isurnes ctvi cemand c o
Notices may be published a maxi- any area, new grad or u
mum of two times on request; Dayyarsepern d
Calendar items appear once only. City of Detroit, listings
StuC _n' organization notices a r e come in and read throug
not accepted for publication. F o r cation and re in
more information, phone 764-9270. semester.
J9Stateof Michigan, open
JANUARY 9, 1970 ham and Wayne counties,
Systems Analyst, apply be
Day Calendarc., Allsta'e Regional Offic
DCa Mich., openings in manpo
Astronomy Colloquium: Charles Cow- property adjustment, cast
ley, University of ivichigan, "Absolute ment
- Oscillation Strengths and Cosmic State of Michigan, open
Abundance of Iron": 296 PA, 4:00 P.M. ham and Wayne , countie
programmers.
F 1 AT "SUMMER PLACEMENT
G le'eneral lNdOtices 212 SAB, Lower L
Interview held at' S.P.S.
sMonther Sien J .or Playf9 at hile uary 9, Camp Wabikon C
-Sd,- Mot pSresJnm8ad, t ilad, Coed, openings for g
Aud. 3-5p~m.selors and spec, in swmi
AComputing Center short course on skiing, arts & crafts, and
Projectaccount, the program w h i c h Interview at'sPSnext n
permits instructors and project directors Daven Tree Cmpany, Ken
to distribute money, file space, etc. to door work, exper in land
the individual signon ID's for their for such majors as lands,
class or project. Introductory know- res. Good pay and room
ledge of MTS assumed. Course held Application deadline is
-940 to 5 p~m., Jan. 9, 1970, 1011 (Sem- pstosa ron ai
1nar Room) of ComputingCenter.C on-tpostons atsArgonne Nat
tact F. Engle, 116 N. University Bldg., or Sr. year by June 70.
764i-2410. Lord Corporation, Erie, PF
To Members of the University Facul- ings for soph, jr, and srs
ty: The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix and Dev. wor.
Project Invites requests for grants to ___.__.
-upport research in "peaceful uses of ENGINEERING PLAC
nudle r energy." New research ideas and SERVICE
pilot projects particularly encouraged. Engineering Placement
Relationship to peaceful 'uses of nuc-2: "Engineering Careers,"
lear energy however, must be clearly kinds of careers for eng
stated in the application. Routine use ___
Of isotope traver techniques will note
by itself justify support. Requests for
grants of $3,000 or less most appro-
priate. Grants cover equipment, sup-
plies, research assistance, and field
trips. Except under unusual circum-
stances, project will not pay the salary
of principal investigator. Applications
for grants are at Phoenix Project by
Jan. 23, 1970. Grants made by April 1.
1970. Application blanks at Phoenix
Project office, Phoenix Memorial Lab.
call 764-6213.
" Alpha Lambda Delta Offers Fellow-
ships: For the 1970-71 academic year the
National Council of Alpha Lambda
Delta will award the Maria Leonard, the
Alice Crocker Lloyd, the Adele Hagner
Stamp, the Kathryn Sisson Phillips,
and the Christine Yerges Conaway Fel--
lowships for graduate study. The
amount of each fellowship Is $2000. At-
tendance at a graduate school which
has a chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta
is encouraged. Any member of Alpha
tambda Delta who graduated in 1967.
.1968 or 1969 who has maintained t h e
scholastic average throughout her col-
%,lege career is eligible. Graduating
seniors may apply is they have main-
tained this average to the end of the
first semester (or first quarter) of this
year. Applicants will be judged on
bcholastic record, recommendations, the
soundness of the applicant's project
and purpose and, to some extent, on
need. Application blanks and informa-
tion may be obtained from Mrs. Nancy
Hessle, 1011 S.A.B., 764-7416. The ap-
plication must be completed by the ap-
plicant and submitted to the National
Fellowship Chairman by January 15,
1970.
Placement SerIce
GENERAL DIVISION
3?00 S.A.B.
Current Openings are received at Gen.
Typing-Priming
Xerox Copies
100 COPIES-$1.95
601 E. William'
(next to Mark's)
761-3596

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We, Don 't Just
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* We meet new people
" We laugh a lot
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0 We play football (once)

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