100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1970

THE 1Yt1CH1GAN DAIC.Y

MILITARY, MEDIA CRITICIZED

The University -of Michigan
Center for Russian and East European Studies'
ATTENTI ON!
Special meeting for undergrads
interested in a BA degree in
Russian and East European Studies
on
W dnesday, February 4
4:10 P.M.
Room 1 (basement) Lane Hall
( Refreshments served)

W orkshops

cover repression

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The many types
of repression in American society were
explored last night in workshops fol-
lowing the main speech of the two-
day Conference on Repression. The fol-
lowing reports were written by Daily
staffers Tova Klein, Debbie Thal, W.
E. Schrock, and Judy Kahn.)
Repression and
the media
Televisiin programming, its stereotyp-
ing of racial characteristics and its ten-
dency to paint good and ban in terms of
traditional values were the subject of dis-
cussion at the workshop "Mass Media and
Repession."
George Pew, a member of Detroit News-

reel and of American}Revolutionary Media,
}ARM), talked about how the media co-
opts new trends among youth to make
money.
"TV will even let you be a black man with
an Afro haircut, if you work for the pigs"
he said, referring to the black hero of "The
Mod Squad."
Pew explained how ARM writes news
broadcasts for WABX, a progressive rock
station in Detroit, using rewritten news
clippings mostly from the Detroit Free Press.
Pew pointed out that WABX itself is sup-
ported by ultra-right winger H. L. Hunt,
who only allows it to remain on the air, Pew
claims, because it makes the most profits
of any station.
Pew said the media leads to repression be-
cause it controls news, and forces people to

THIS WEEK at DELI HOUSE
-ra KOSHER SING-ALONG
SUNDAY, FEB. 1

5:30

P.M.

Ru bin Douglass hit
cultural repression

adopt to the norms they see. He blasted
the Federal Communications Commission for
not exercising more firm authority over cer-
tain stations which have racist policies.
He pointed out that current FCC chair-
man, who was appointed last year by Presi-
dent Nixon, was formerly Barry Goldwater's
campaign manager.
Repression and
welfare law
Two members of the Washtenaw County
chapter of the National Welfare Rights
NWR) organization conducted a workshop
on "Welfare as Repression" last night.
Mrs. Emerson, an organizer for the Wash-
tenaw NWR, said the theoretical goal of
national welfare policy is to keep families
together so most members can be socially
productive and those individuals who are
unable to support themselves due to per-
manent disabilities, age, and other reasons,
can get enough government aid to live
decently...
One example of the discrepancy between
welfare policy and action involves Aid to
Dependent Children. Present law, the legal-
ity of which is disputed, brings strong pres-
sures on women who apply for ADC-and
who are separated from their husbands-
to file for divorce.
Many welfare allowances are inadequate
to cover today's cost of living, Mrs. Emerson
said. For example, a 26 cent per person per
meal allowance is given to welfare recipients
not participating in Michigan's food stamp
program. This is not enough to keep a fam-
ily healthy over a long period, especially for
teenagers and growing children, Mrs. Emer-
son said,
Wlf are recipients are ont told what
services they are eligible for, Mrs. Emerson
said. Welfare laws are such "closely guarded.
secrets" she days, claiming that NWR had
to use informants and pay $125 to get'a-
copy of the laws.,

with BOB STARK
and GOR DY GOODMAN
Bring your guitars;
We provide the corned beef.
a T H E HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.

(Continued from Page, 1)
Rights Committee. She said most people
are uninformed about the welfare situation,
with prejudices rather than facts deter-
mining public attitutes on welfare.
"We're suffering from the same oppres-
sion," she added. "We have no control over
our lives-if I want to do anything I have
to check with my caseworker."
Mrs. Emerson said charges that welfare
recipients are lazy are untrue. "If it's good
enough for a middle-class woman to stay
home and raise children, it's good enough
for me," she explained. "My contention is
that if we have to go out and work they
should too - instead of living off their hus-
bands."
"Consistently at the county and state
levels, welfare agencies have been enforc-
ing the English poor laws of the 1500's,"

said Mrs. Emerson, claiming that some wel-
fare practices are illegal.
Although throughout the speeches the
audience was enthusiastic, Jerry Rubin pro-
vided the biggest laughs of the evening. "My
name is Johnny Cash and I'm playing at
the University of Michigan penitentiary,"
he opened to the applause of the crowd.
Much of his speech dealt with the "Con-
spiracy 7" trial. "The strategy of the'trial,
from the beginning, is to see that the judge
has a heart attack," Rubin explained. "Then
we'll have to start all over again and it will
cost the government another billion dol-
lars." ,
Describing the gagging of Bobby Seale,
Judge Hoffman's refusal to allow defense
witnesses to sing and the defendants' an-
tics, Rubin concluded, "I don't know whe-
ther it is high comedy or low tragedy."

Marchers rally at County Bldg.

{ 4- - -

i

C
ON
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
1 P.M. GENERAL MEETING
NAT. will be brief, to set the tone for t
sci. and comment on the workshops to
AUD.

he day
follow

S.M.
MASo*
HALL

INDVIDUA L WORKSHOPS
ON RESPONSE4
(see Friday's Daily for Room No.'s.);
"RESPONSE TO REPRESSION:
WHAT CAN WE DO?"
Summary of conference; Discussion on
response

The Ann Arbor Bank is notorious for its
poor service to students, and NOW it is
aiding landlords in the garnishments of
Rent-Strikers' Bank Accounts!
SUPPORT THE TENANTS UNION
" ;
erate You
Bank Acount!
The Ann Arbor Tenants Union and SGC urge
all students to remove their bank accounts
from the Ann Arbor Bank on Friday, Feb.
6 from 3 P.M. onward at the South Univer-
sity Branch,.
There ARE other banks

WEDNESDAY

6:30 P.M.

FEBRUA

t

ta
Det#roit Councilman
PH I KAPPA TAU
1910 Hill
For information: 761-7082 761-4565

R

Y4

Repression of
women{
"We want control over our
own lives, we wantto set up an
individual basis what will be a
decent life for our families,
and we want dignity and to be
treated half-way decently by the
community," Mrs. Emerson said.
Approximately 100 persons
showed up for a workshop on
"Repression of Women" follow-
ing last night's speeches at Hill
Auditorium.
The session was opened with
poetry, read by a member of _
Ann Arbor Women's Liberation
Movement. The poem, entitled
"We Rise Up Angry, We Rise
Up Together," written by Bar-
bara Reill, told of a woman whot
was raised in the traditionally
passive female role who sudden- .
ly realized her womanhood after
marriage.
Following the poetry reading
the floor was opened for ques-
tions and comments which
ranged from the pill to marriage
to job discrimination.
One girl expressed anger at a
speech earlier in the evening by
Bishop Edward Crowther. She
charged him with discrimina-
tion against women in his de-
erences to men in concentra-
tion camps and men in the en-
tire church system.
Another of three rose to say
that, "women are not listenedR

4P.M.
NAT.
A Sd.

"""" ""

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

to, their opinions are disre-
garded, they are not even in the
brotherhood of man."
There were many men attend-
ing the workshop. One of them,
pSychology Prof. Edward Ler-
ner of Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity, asked, ':How many men
work to put their wives through
school? Why? Because we all
believe in certain genetically
determined roles which say men
are one certain way while wo-
men are another way. For ex-
ample, when women talk about
politics, men either ignore what.
they are saying or denigrate it."
One student brought up an
analogy. He said that if you
had a black roommate you
would not expect him to cook
and clean for you.He then
Sasked .how men could expect
women to automatically accept
a similar domestic role.
One woman expressed distress
that she had never had the cour-
age to ask a male for a date. A
male said he was glad that the
girls at the meeting were so grub-
by looking. Then he went on to
clarify himself by defining all
men as grubby because they do
not set their hair or wear make-
up.
Repression in
the militar
In the U.S. armed forces, the
enlisted man is an oppressed
slave and the officer is "a
fascist slave-driver." This was
the theme of the workshop on
"Repression in the Military"
headed by Andy Stepp of the
American Servicemen's Union.
75 persons, including students,
women, ex-GI's and preseit
members of the armed forces
participated.
The workshop began with a
Newsreel film concerning the
military followed by a presenta-
tion by Stepp. Stepp spent most
of, his time on a story of a re-
cent rebellion in the stockade
at Fort Bragg and concluded
his representation with a ques-
tipn and answer period.
The movie was filled with
cliches. There was the old line
by an sargeant in basic train=
ing telling his inductees "Your
mother took care of you at home.
She is not here. I am your new
mother now." The. movie said
that basic training is the mili-
tary's way of dehumanizing and
controlling freedom-loving sol-
diers. In the words of one sol-
dier in the movie, "It is the on-
ly way the military can be sure
of us, to make sure we do not
talk about the pertinent issues
that effect us."
Black soldiers stated reluct-
ance to move against "political
uprisings" in the nations inner
cities.

WORKSHOPS:
1. POLITICAL ORGANIZING AND POLITICAL TRIALS
L2.LEGAL SELF-DEFENSE
3. REPRESSION ON CAMPUSES
4 REPRESSION OF NEW CULTURE
5. THE WAR ON THE BLACK STRUGGLE
6. THE DRAFT AS REPRESSION
7. WELFARE AS REPRESSION
8. THE ACLU AND POLITICAL REPRESSION
"THE LIFE YOU SAVE WILL BE YOUR OWN"

1528 SAB .: 763-310U2

Daily Classifieds Get Results

I

APART M E NT TO SU BLE T
FOR T HIS SUMM E R?
Here's How To Rent It Quick Through The
Michigan Daily's "Student Housing Guide"

EXAMPLE

DEADL N E-
FRI DAY,
FEB. 20
The quickest and easiest
way to sublet your pad
is'through The Daily's
special apartment
supplement to be
published Sunday,
M'arch 1.

THE FINEST
IN
APARTMENT
MODERN 4-MAN APT.
with central air con-
ditioning and heating,
garbage disposal,
parking lot facilities,
large front view
picture window,
completely furnished,
live-in manager.
2 large Bedrooms
CALL 76i9-3247

I I
* 1
I !
I
* NAME_____
I i
'ADDRE SS___. ___ __I
E I
* PHO3NE-___ ___
* I
Print or Type Copy Legibly in
Space Provided as You Would ;
II
Like t to ppear
I
* I
I
I I
I I
I I
I I
* t
* I
I I
I I
I I
I
I R
l I
II
I 1
* I
1 I
f I
t I
1 I
I t
I i
r I
I I
a s
* r
t I
I I
{ r
* I
I I
* I
I I
I I
,a I
E

I

SPECIAL

1969 FIAT 124 SPIDERS

SALE'

d
,e 1: r.:,.:,.....

For only $6
you can place a
1 Coix 4"
advertisement with a
guaranteed circulation of

i'Ir; ' "
1 O~
; s 0

...N .
r,~~
V'"
a \O'mss.

SPEEDY
Copy and
Duplicating Center
Typing-Printing
Xerox Copies
100 COPIES-$1.95
601 E. William
(next to Mark's)
761-3596
Sell
a 1 1

k

.i

f

.

U

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan