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February 01, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-01

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Parking problems space out Ann Arbor drivers

HELD OVER!
__ _ _2nd W EEK,...
NO 2-6264 SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:30
The Most Explosive Spy Scandal of the Century!

By BOB SCHREINER
Having a car in Ann Arbor may or
may not be a luxury. In fact, with the
parking situation the way it presently
is many people believe the automobile
is too much of a bother. Those who
don't have cars see them as a blessing,
while owners are becoming increasingly
perplexed as the situation gets worse.
The problem is very simple: there are
too many cars and not enough places
to park them, even though the number
of parking spaces in the city has stead-
ily increased each year up to its cur-
rent total of 5,000.
The problem began about five years
ago, says Lt. Robert Conn, head of traf-
fic Enforcement for the Ann Arbor Po-
lice Department. Then, he says, no one
anticipated Ann Arbor's large popula-
tion increase.
But now parking space is at a prem-

ium and must be policed more closely.
This duty falls to Conn, who issues traf-
fic violation notices.
"Most of our staff are cadets who are
employed on a limited duty basis," he
says. "They are going to school at the
University or at Eastern Michigan, and,
they usually work about two or three
days a week. There are no sworn police-
men normally giving out parking tick-
ets."
Conn flatly denies that "meter
maids" have a required quota of tickets
to write every day. "These people follow
the law and u s e common sense," he
says. "If anything, they give out' far
less tickets than they could."
About 1,000 tickets are issued every
day and Conn estimates that up to 150,-
000 cars circulate daily through t h e
city. The number of ticketed vehicles
is less than one percent of the total.
"In proportion to the total number of

cars," Conn maintains, "violations are
really very low."
The purpose of the parking meter
system is to insure consistent turnover
of all available parking space in the
city, Conn adds. And despite any short-
comings the system has, he is quick to
defend it
"It works, there's no doubt about it,"
he claims. "There is a much more ef-
fective turnover through parking meters
than parking structures. I can see no
alternative that can do the job as well.
Nationwide, everyone wants to find a
better way - but if there is one, no one
knows about it."
Conn is also quick to point out that it
"costs' a lot of money to collect money.
In fact," he says, "to effectively en-
force the law to the fullest would be
self-depleting. T h e more you collect,
the more it costs."
John Robbins, director of parking

and the traffic engineer, also sees a
definite traffic problem facing the city.
He sees the need for more "all-day type
parking instead of the short-term kind."
Robbins reported that there are pres-
ently 1,452 street parking meters, 764
off-street meters, and 3,092 parking
spaces in lots and car ports. Together
these yielded a total revenue of $478,664
for the first 6 months of 1969.
However, the difference between
operating expenses and revenue was
only $30,000. Robbins estimates total in-
come from 1969 to be $1,046,960, while he
places operating expenses at $1,055,250,
in which case the city stands to lose
around $10,000.
Robbins believes the parking situa-
tion in Ann Arbor, will remain un-
changed in the near future. He said the
closest thing to positive action now is
the study of a proposed plan for the

construction of several "satellite" park-
ing structures in the outskirts of the
city. Shoppers would park their cars in
them and ride buses into the city proper.
There also appear to be no plans to
install more parking meters on residen-
tial streets or within the city itself.
Last year there was a proposal before
Council to install parking meters in the
downtown area and the University "in-
ner fringe." At that time Council put a
hold on the establishment of any new
meters. This ban has not been lifted.
This picture looks brighter, however,
compared to the prediction Robbins
makes for 5 or 10 years from now.
"In the long haul period of time,"
he says, "and through traffic projec-
tions, it is a fairly safe assumption that
there won't be any on-street parking at
all. On-street parking will be eliminated
to make way for growing traffic."

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE " TECI-NICOOR

1

. Persons under 18 not admitted
From the country that
gave you"I,AWOMAN"
"INGA"and "I AM CURIOUS"
(YLLW

the
by The Associated Pr ess and College.-Press Service

Q

S"r~idgitn

Datit

i

page three

'FANNY HILL' is a "porno-classic!"
-ARCHER WINSTON

"1nthere with sex and love
,m - :a $iithe Way!"
'R>'. Jerry Gross and Nicholas Demetroules.
new... and from Sweden
Oistrbuted by CINEMATION INDUSTRIES' COLOR by DeLuxe

S iS- of'Lunl

SUN., MON., TUES.
7:15 and 9:00

BECAUSE OF THE OVERWHELMING RESPONSE
TO THIS PROGRAM WE ARE BRINGING BACK
THE BEATLES MOVIES FOR SATURDAY AND
SUNDAY ONLY
BEATLES DOUBLE FEATURE

A 10-DAY RESTRAINING ORDER to halt both a threat-
ened nationwide railroad lockout and the strike against the Un-
ion Pacific that prompted it was granted by a federal judge yes-
terday.
U.S.yDistrict Court Judge John J. Sirica said the 10-day delay
will give Congress a chance to take whatever steps it deems neces-
sary in the wage dispute between four AFL-CIO unions and the na-
tion's railroads.
"In this case, there is no question that irreparable injury would
be suffered" by the unions, railroads, and public if the strike and
lockout were permitted to continue, he added.
THE UNITED STATES is giving Nationalist China thirty-
four old F100 jet fighter bombers.
The planes, which will be taken out of storage, are being provided
as part of a program to modernize Formosa's air force. Money to
supply modern F4 Phantom fighters was dropped last week from a
compromise foreign aid bill.
* .' * * .
SENATE DEMgOCRATS plan to renew their drive to win a
$100-a-month minimum Social Security payment for the individ-
ual.
The increase sponsored by Senate Majority leader Mike Mans-
field and Sen. Robert C. Byrd {D-W.Va.>, represents a 56 per cent
increase over the present benefit of $54-a-month. Mansfield said,
"It is obvious no one can live on $64 in these times.
The Nixon administration opposes the $100 minimum as too
costly, estimating the annual cost at $2 billion.
* * * *
CHIEF LEABUA JONATHAN, prime minister of Lesotho,
has seized control of the government.
Jonathan declared a state of emergency and suspended the con-
stitution following elections which he declared invalid. Charges of vote
rigging, intimidation, and ballot box stuffing have been made in'
connection with the elections, the first for the new nation inside,
South Africa.
Jonathan said he expected the state of emergency "to be very
short-lived indeed" and would not ban the opposition.
* * * *
THE U.S. VIETNAM COMMAND ackowledged yesterday that
there have been periodic air-to-ground engagements in North
Vietnam since the bombing halt 15 months ago.
The strikes were made "from time to time" in response tQ North
Vietnamese anti-aircraft fire or missiles. They were not made public
because they were considered to be "insignificant."

WASHINGTON fAit - President Nixon's proposed expan-
sion of the Safeguard antiballistic missile system was chal-
lenged yesterday by the Senate's Democratic leader; who fore-
cast a price tag reaching $50 billion and demanded "Where
the hell is it going to end?"
"What is going to happen to people?" asked Sen. Mike
Mansfield of Montana, "if weapons spending is to be boosted.
"The issue is of such magnitude that I believe another de-
bate . . . is in the offing," Mansfield said in an interview.
The last one locked the Senate in defense debate for two
months, and ended on Aug. 6

Sunday, February 1, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

ABM

proposal

STOP WORRYING% I
a 4
IS ON TiE WAYI
The Co~i~iIdes of
THE BEAhES
.rmoreConofiulthmnever...inCOLWRl
WTUANCOLOU ADIIEDAtTIST8meI

-Associated Press
Announces railroad lockout
John P. Hiltz, chief negotiator for U.S. railroads announces a
nationwide lockout of union workers. The lockout was in retalia-
tion for a union strike against the Union Pacific.
DAILY OFFICIA L BULLETIN
Mmmmra~mmt .... x"e~m."e.:;s: ,.gmW.ns.#EW#Ero

rCOLObDex

'II

" 8

'" -:°~c l United Artists
adults-$1:50
children-75c
Yellow Sub-12:30 and 3:30
Help-2:00 and 5:00
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY ONLY
not continuous with
"FANNY HILL".. UVJ "iFIM. OUM

with a 50-50 roll call vote
which defeated an amend-
ment to block the first phase
of the Nixon ABM proposal.
That involved deployment of
ABM missiles, radars and com-
puters at two sites to defend U.S.
offensive missile installations, and
the purchase of land for 10 more.
Nixon said Friday night he has
decided the system should be ex-
panded to provide a defense
aroundU.S. populationdareas
against a possible future attack
by Red China. The President said
Secretary of Defense Melvin R.;
Laird would announce the details
within 30 days.
While Nixon said such an area
defense would be "virtually in-
fallible" against attack by a min-
or nuclear power, Mansfield said
major questions remain unansw-
ered about the vulnerability and
reliability of the Safeguard sys-
tem.
"The President has resurrected
the Chinese threat which he said,
about a year ago, if I remember
correctly, he couldn't buy," Mans-
field said.
"If we go ahead with this huge
. . .combination system, we had
better realize that it will cost
in the tens of billions of dollars-
in my opinion well beyond $50 bil-
lion," he said.
"The question is, where is the
money coming from-what does it
do to our domestic problems-
what will be the reaction in t h e
Soviet Union - will we become
involved in another arms race?"
Mansfield also questioned what
such a move would mean to the
strategic arms limitation talks now
under way with the Soviet Union.

GUILD H OUSE
802 MONROE
MON., FEB. 2 - NOON LUNCHEON 25c
MERILEE OAKS, Dept. of Development Psych.:
"Psychological Effects of all Contraceptives,"
"..;.the Pill and Personality"
TUES., FEB. 3 - NOON LUNCHEON
Due to popularity--more origami

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Day Calendar
Degree Recital: Jack Roberts, piano
lecture recital: School of u sic Re-
cital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
International Cntr.: "Mchaelangelo,
The Last Giant" and "East Germany,
Land Beyond the Wall, 7:30 p~zm.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Student Relations Committee*Meet-'
ing: Agenda. 1) Minutes, 2) Report
of OSU Police Committee, 3) Funding.
of the IM 1idg., Council Rm. 3540 SAB,'
10-12 a.m.
High Energy Colloquium: D. Clne,
U. of Wisconsin, "Direct Channel Boson
Production in NN Collisions" P & A
Colloq. Bin., 4:00 p.m.

Engineering Mechanics Seminar: Dr.
E. 0. Tuck, Dept. of Mathematics,
Univ. of Adelaide, Australia, "Unsteady
Flow of a Viscous Fluid from a Source
in a Wall", Rm. 311 West Engineering
Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Lecture:aFormer DetroitMay y r
Jerome Cavanagh, "The Urban Scene:
Politics and Pressures," Rackham Hall,
4:15 p.m.
Phi Beta Kappa Lecture: Prof. J. E.
Bardach, Sch. of Nat. Resources, "Af-
(Continued on ;Page 6)
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail. -
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

Judge
i
DELAND, Fla. (A') - A federal
judge told Volusia County school
officials yesterday that he expects
complete s c h o o 1 desegregation
next w e e k despite Gaov. Claude
Kirk's order prohibiting forced
busing. -
U.S. Dist. Court Judge Charles
R. Scott said in a telegram to
school board attorney John Mat-
tingly that Scott's pupil desegre-
gation orders a1.e "still in fiull
force and effect The court ex-
pects full compliance with those
orders."
The Volusia school board had
voted yesterday to ask the judje
for a hearing on what it should
do about the conflict between his
ruling and Kirk's executive order
barring school officials in Volusia
and .Manatee Counties from using
forced busing and several other
methods to e n d segregated
schools.
"Your request for an emergency
hearing is respectfully denied,"
Scott.said in the telegram.
Gerald Mager, Kirk's legal aide,
declined to comment on the
judge's decision, when contacted
at his office in the capitol at Tal-
lahassee.
Mattingly saidi he would have to
recommend to the board that it
obey the court and not Kirk.
"I certainly as an attorney and
officer of the court am never go-
ing to tell the board to disobey a
federal court order," he said.

1 I

MAK IS oen 9a.m. -3p.,
serving sandwiches,.
soups cereals,
coffees and pastries Cetc.
BUT:
We can't be open nights anymore because we're losing too
much money after 3:00 p.m. We've talked over a lot of
alternatives, and the only possibility of re-opening at night
is to ask for membership fees of $5.00 per month per person.
Until we do get enough subscriptions to open nights, we will
continue to be open only days, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Your subscription entitles you to come in six nights a week
(we will be closed Sundays) from 6:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m., a
chair, part of a table, a floor, a ceiling, lights, heat, and
maid service. We need at least 270 subscriptions before we
can re-open nights, and at least that same amount each
month to continue to remain open nights.
Does this community want a place for quiet conversation,
chess, chamber music, and a decent cup of coffee?
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE _
~ ...,L cn

Creative e Lt4 leti) I

...

FEBRUARY

U. OF MICH.

6-SAM FULLER, Film Director
CINEMA GUILD, 7 P.M., ARCH. AUD. $1.25
8-LOUIS FALCO and Featured Dancers
MODERN DANCE, 8:30 P.M., HILL AUD. $2.75
12 & 13-THE CONCEPT! Off-Broadway Show
THURSDAY, 8 P.M., FRI., 7:15 & 10 P.M., TRUEBLOOD, $2.75
15-TOM WOLFE, Author of Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
LECTURE AND WORKSHOP, 3 P.M., TRUEBLOOD $1.25
19-JOHN BIGGERS, Black Artist
SLIDE LECTURE, 8:30 P.M., ANGELL HALL AUD. A $1.00
AZFESTIVAL
20-MILES DAVIS and RON CARTER
21-CANNONBALL ADDERLEY,
WILLIAM FISCHER and ALVIN BATISTE

DO YOU HAVE A SOCIALLY
RELEVANT DISSERTATION ?
WE'D LIKE TO TRY TO FUND IT
CONTACT
THE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT GROUP
802 MONROE ST.
DAN HARRISON - ROGER ROMAN
764-5288 (or leave message 764-7480}

22.99 Ladies' & Men's
'H-ouston 14" tall
SCHNEIDER WESTERN SUPPLY
2635 Saline Road
Ann Arbor, Mich Ph. 663-0 111

Only 2

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