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January 30, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-30

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page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, January 30, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

the V
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. and its 12 striking unions were
reported closing in on a settlement of a 95-day strike yesterday.
Informed sources in Washington reported that the unions would
gain wage increases of more thai 80 cents an hour, or some 25 per
cent, over 40 months, and a favorable contract termination date under
the proposed settlement.
About 42 per cent of the GE work force has been striking. The
strikers were averaging about $3.25 an hour when their contract ex-
pired last Oct. 26.
In a development related to the strike, the company announced
in Utica, N.Y., that it was laying off 1,500 workers in defense contract
work. A spokesman attributed the action to a cutback in defense con-
tracts and the impact of the current strike.
A FEDERAL GRAND JURY yesterday indicted three men on
a charge of conspiring to kill Joseph Yablonski, United Mine
Workers Union insurgent leader.
The jury said Yablonski's death was plotted for six months and
that one of the three had a fund from which he paid the other two for
their part in the slaying.
The federal indictment also charged the three with conspiring
to obstruct justice because Yablonski was about to be a witness before
a federal grand jury convened in Washington, D.C., to investigate
union activities.
A second charge was conspiring to deprive Yablonski of his rights
as a union member.
THE TRIAL of the Chicago 7 continued this week with the
major .development being Judge Julius Hoffman's decision to bar
Ramsey Clark, former U.S. Attorney General from testifying
as a witness for the defense.
The Government objected to Mr. Clark's appearance and Judge
Hoffman ruled thatsClark could make "no relevant or material con-
tribution" to the case."
William Kunstler, a defense attorney, said that the judge's ruling
was "absolutely unheard of in the history of the United States" and
"sets a precedent that is horrendous to contemplate."
Kunstler noted it was the first criminal case he knew of in which
a witness willing to testify for the defense was barred from the stand
by the judge.
U.S. STEEL CORP., the nation's largest steelmaker, an-
nounced price increases of from $4 to $6 a ton on products used to
make cars and appliances.
The move ended a drive over the past week and a half by most
steel companies to raise prices on more than half the industry's ship-
ments.
U.S. Steel is a major supplier to the auto industry. In Detroit,
General Motors Corp., which is believed to buy between one-third and
one-fourth of its steel from U.S. Steel, had no comment on the price
hike.
In making the announcement, U.S. Steel said the price move was
in line with those recently announced by the other companies.
U.S. Steel's move came two days after it reported a decrease in3
income from $253.7 million in 1968 to $217.1 million in 1969.
SECURITY AUTHORITIES in Northern Ireland ordered
another weekend liquor ban in Belfast to help prevent further
outbreaks of violence.
They also extended a ban on public parades throughout the
province until Feb. 5 which was due to expire at midnight Saturday.
Unrest erupted in a short but violent encounter early yesterday
when a Protestant crowd stoned British troops barring a march on
Belfast's Roman Catholic community.
In London, British Home Secretary James Callaghan blamed
disturbances in the North Ireland capital this week on teen-age
hoodlums, some of whom were drunk.
A similar ban imposed last year was credited with helping to
calm things down in Belfast.
I ~-

-Associated Press

New council on environment

President Nixon names three members of the newly created Council of Environmental Quality. The
nominees from left to right are: Undersecretary of the Interior Russell Train, chairman of the
group; Gordon McDonald, vice chancellor at the University of California; and Robert Cahn, Pulitzer
Prize winning reporter for the Christian Science Monitor. All appointments are subject to Senate
confirmation.
FACULTY SPONSORSHIP:
Curri culum Co mmittee sets
new Course Mart guideines

Women
attack
Carswell
Reject nominee
on grounds of sex
discrimination.
WASHINGTON (ZP} - T w a
strong-voiced women, one a
Hawaii congresswoman a n d
the other best-selling author
Betty Friedan, told the Senate
Judiciary C o m m I t t e e that
Judge Harold Carswell's nom-
ination to the Supreme Court
should be turned down on sex
discrimination grounds.
His "basic philosophy," said
Rep. Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii,
is "totally unbecoming of a man
being considered for appointment
to the highest court of the land.":
She cited one judicial action -
his v o t e as a federal appeals
court judge against reconsidera-
tion of a woman's claim that she
was denied a job because she had
small children.
Carswell, who had not sat on
the case, voted along with nine
other circuit judges against re-
consideration by the full court.
"Such a judge," said Mrs. ink-
"in my opinion is not fit to serve
on the Supreme Court."
Mrs. Friedan, author of "The
Feminine Mystic," called Cars-
well a "sexist judge" who "evi-
dently believed women should be
"defiled and used as sex objects."
The all-male committee ack-
nowledged with a bit of what Sen.
Birch Bayh (D-Indiana) called
"male smugness," that women of-
ten are victims of unfair discrim-
ination.
The case that aroused the wo-
men is now on appeal to the Su-
preme Court. It involves a mother
of pre-school children who was
turned down by Martin Marietta
Corp. for the j o b of assembly
trainee.
The women charged her federal
civil rights had been violated.-
"I believe that Judge Carswell
demonstrated a total lack of un-
derstanding of the concept of
equality and that his vote repre-
sented a vote against the right oD
women to be treated equally and
fairly under the law," said Mrs.
Mink.
Mrs. Mink, who is of Japanese
ancestry, said she could not "dis-
miss" the speech Carswell made in
1948 affirming a belief in white
supremacy.
"I believe," she said, "his words
must be weighed along with his
lack of sensitivity for women's
struggle for equality."
"Male supremacy, like white su-
premacy, is equally repugnant to
those who really believe in equal-
ity."
Sen. Marlow Cook (R-Ken-
tucky), one of Carswell's cham-
pions, lectured both women that
they were condemning the judge
"on very thin ice."

By DAVE CHUDWIN
The LSA Curriculum Commit-
tee yesterday established guide-
lines concerning who may teach
Course Mart classes and set up a
committee to approve proposed
Course Mart offerings.
The Course Mart program al-
lows students to suggest courses
on subjects not taught by Univer-;
sity departments - like science
fiction literature-or courses with

experimental methods of instruc-
tion.
The committee agreed that all
Course Mart classes must be spon-
sored by a member of the LSA
faculty. Faculty members f r o m
other schools and colleges within
the University and other univer-
sities may also sponsor courses
with the approval of the LSA dean
and executive committee.
Under one of t h e guidelines

Laird cites requisites
for volunteer army

qualified graduate students may
do the actual teaching involved in
the courses. However, the spon-
sor is officially responsible for the
class.
After lengthy debate, committee
members voted to allow under-
graduates and non-academic to
teach Course Mart classes under
the sponsorship of a faculty mem-
ber.
In such special cases the com-
mittee ruled t h a t the sponsor
mnust approve the qualifications of
the instructor, the subject matter
involved, the method of grading,
the mode of instruction and must
sign the grade sheets of students
who enroll in the class.
The committee also established
a new Course Mart committee to
pass on the qualifications of pro-
posed courses under policies set
by the curriculum committee.
The only question left unresolv-
ed by yesterday's actions is the
number of Course Mart offerings
a faculty member would be able
to sponsor. That will be decided
next Friday when the curriculum
committee will give final approval
to the entire Course Mart pack-
age.
History Prof. Shaw Livermore,
committee chairman, said the
new Course Mart committee and
guidelines would lessen the time
spent on the Course Mart and al-
low the curriculum committee to
consider more basic reforms.

DIANA KJAER - Hans EmbackKeve Hjelm
Written and Directed by MA- AHLBERQ;w"]
Produced byTORE SJOBERG for MINERVA-EUROPA
COLOR by DeLuxe "Distributed byCINEMATION INDUSTRIES
IGNm aNRCKRECORDI
.AwaSeblon ua ecora.npa te.o

WASHINGTON, tP)-Secretary
of Defense Melvin R. Laird yester-
day warned that s'hiting to g
draft-free military force will re-
quire a slash to about two million
men, lowest since before the Ko-
rean War.
Laird also said such a limited
force-about 1.3 million below cur-
rent levels-will be possible only
if Congress votes more money to
meet "the tremendous expense"
of strengthening the National'
Guard and Reserve.
"I personally believe that you
have to get down to a level for an
all-volunteer service . . . near the
two million mark," the defense
secretary told a youth group..
A special commission is expected'
I -

to recommend to President Nixon
witiin the next two or three weeks
K formula for achieving an all-
volunteer force. Some key Penta-
gon civilian and military author-
ities have privately expressed skep-
ticism that such a goal is feasible.
without huge spending increases.
Laird mentioned no cost figure
in connection with Guard-Reserve
strengthening. The Pentagon will
spend about $2.9 billion this year
to support a ready Reserve-Guard
totaling about one million men.
A regular military force of close
to two million men would be the
smallest since June 1950 when
there were 1.46 million Americans
in uniform.

I T r '!I oru!yA

FRI.-7:15, 9:00, 10:45
SAT -7:15, 9:0, 10:45

-

NOW

4M

DIAL
8-6416

MARK'S isopen9.a.m.1-3p.m.,
serving sandwiches,
soups, cereals,
coffees and pastries, etc.
BUT: /
We can't be open nights anymore because we're losing too
much money after 3:00 p.m. We've talked over a lot of
alternatives, and the only possibility of re-opening at night
is to ask for membership fees of $5.00 per month per person.
Until we do get enough subscriptions to open nights, we will
continue to be open only days, from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Your subscription entitles you to come in six nights a week
(we will be closed Sundays) from 6:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m., a
chair, part of a table, a floor, a ceiling, lights, heat, and
maid service. We need at. least 270 subscriptions before we
can re-open nights, and at least that same amount each
month to continue to remain open nights.
Does this community want a place for quiet conversation,
chess, chamber music, and a decent cup of coffee?
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE

GOLDEN LION WINNER !

ALICE'S RESTAURANT
Presents
"TO BE A CROOK"
SHOWS AT 8 AND 10P.M.
S0c

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HELD OVER!
2nd WEEK .. .

NO 2-6264 SHOWS AT:
1 :00-3 :05-5 :10-7:15-9:30
The Most Explosive Spy Scandal of the Century!

MONDAY through FRIDAY
at 7 and 9 P.M.

r SATURDAY and SUNDAY
at 1,3; 5,7,9 P.M.

f "

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ROBERT BRESSON WEEKEND
"Never before in Ann Arbor"
THURSDAY-FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 30
THE TRIAL of JOAN of ARC
(1962)
"Nothing is done to explain Joan of Arc"
CATIIR1AYCIIv c AvlAN 21 EER 1

.., f.: :
A UNNVERSA, PICTURE " TECHNICtLOR

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