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January 29, 1970 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-29

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5th Week
showes at
William Faulkner's Pa
Novel "The Reive
"The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-
ter. A marvelous time is had by
all."-New York Magazine
Steve McQueen
"The Rejvers'
.with
SHARON FARRE.LL
and WILL GEER

ulitzer Prize-Winning
rs" is now a film!
-

DIAL
5-b240

page threes

Sitt~iitan

tti1

NESS PHONE: 7640554

Thursday, January 29, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

1

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1

Alpha Kappa Psi
(Grad. Business)

Phi Delta Phi
(Law Frcternity )

Unvite
U oMCOD

to a
T.G.

I

J1

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
A DETECTIVE told a secret Senate hearing last June that
members of the Black Panther party had been ordered to fortify
their homes and repel any police raids.
Detective William E. Grogan, an intelligence officer with the
Yonkers, N.Y. police department, presented the information to the
Senate Internal Security subcommittee.
Grogan cited a statement written by Huey P. Newton, Black
Panther minister of defense. The officer said the statement was an
"executive mandate" that had gone to all Panthers.
SUPREME COURT NOMINEE G. HAROLD CARSWELL is
expected to be approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee soon.
Congressional sources said.
Yesterday Carswell, a conservative, glided through his second
and final day of testimony before the committee.
Two committee liberals, Sens. Birch Bayh (D-Ind) and Edward
M. Kennedy (D-Mass), questioned Carswell about a share of stock
he had bought in an all-white country club in Tallahassee, Florida
in 1955.
Carswell said he did not have racial segregation in mind when
he contributed $100 to the club.
THE WIFE of a defendant in the Joseph Yablonski family
slayings invoked the Fifth Amendment in testifying before a
federal grand jury yesterday.
Attorney Harry Starkoff said Mrs. Aubran W. Martin "took the
Fifth Amendment on all questions except for a few on matters un-
related to the incident."
Three men from the Cleveland area have been charged with
murder and are being held in Pennsylvania.
* * *
ISRAELI PLANES yesterday attacked Cairo for the first time
since the 1967 war.
They hit a suburb, killing three civilians and wounding 12 ac-
cording to the Egyptian military command.
Artillery, rocket and heavy machine-gun fire could be heard in
the center of Cairo echoing from tall buildings. No air raids sirens
were sounded.
A military communique said Israeli planes also hit' a base at
Dahshur, about 15 miles south of Cairo on the west bank of the Nile.
In Tel Aviv a military spokesman said all planes returned safely.!
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan said after the raid that the
attack was planned to show the Egyptian people they are not in a
position to start another full-scale war.
WHOLESALE PRICES rose seven-tenths of one per cent this
month.
The increase was the largest monthly rise in a year.
Prices of processed foods rose two per cent for the month and
showed the sharpest increase, according to a Labor Department report
issued yesterday.
The report indicated a strong prospect for a continued rise in
prices. Wholesale food prices tend to result in higher retail grocery
prices.
* * *
POWER INDUSTRY conglomerates too large to regulate will
develop if utility mergers are left unchecked, a Justice Depart-
ment consultant reported.
Dr. Charles R. Ross, a University of Vermont economist and a
former Federal Power Commission member, said yesterday " in testi-
mony before the Security and Exchange Commission that the federal
government and states now have trouble effectively regulating electric
utilities.
The testimony was filed in a SEC hearing on a proposal by theX
New England Electric System, Eastern Utilities Associates and thet
Boston Edison Co. to form a single holding company.t

Nixon's veto of HEW

WASHINGTON U4B) - President Nixon won his budget
battle with Congress yesterday when House Democrats failed
to override his veto of a $19.7-billion health and education
money bill.
The White House promptly let it be known that it would
be willing to accept increases totaling $448 million over
Nixon's budget request in place of the $1.2 billion added by
~ t. Congress in the vetoed bill.
The 226-191 vote in favor of over-riding the veto was
52 votes short of the two-thirds majority needed, far more
_ . Y= than even Republican leaders had *

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-Associated Press
G.E. talks continue
,Federal Mediator Joe Kirkum, right, talks with Irving Abramson,
general counsel for the AFL-CIO International Union of Electrical
Workers in New York yesterday after delivering some papers in
connection with the General Electric strike. Talks resumed yes- .
terday in efforts to settle the 93-day strike.
40 COURES:
S e
t0 lIn C ass Fb 1

funds

Congress fails to override

forecast. The result was final,
with no Senate action needed.
Nixon's position that the bill
was inflationary was supported by
156 Republicans and 35 Demo-
crats. Only 27 Republicans voted
to over-ride the veto, along with
199 Democrats. Last month 86
Republicans voted for the in-
creased spending despite a warn-
ing the bill would be vetoed.
The action left Congress with
the task of acting quickly on a
substitute bill to provide funds for
the Departments of Labor and of
Health, Education, and Welfare
for the current fiscal year.
At the White House, P r e s s
Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said
Nixon was very pleased at the
support he received.
"He also was pleased that a
substantial number of members of
the House were willing to stand
up and be counted on a major na-
tional priority-getting prices un-
der control," Ziegler told report-
ers.
To demonstrate his gratitude to
the 191 members who voted to up-
hold his veto, Nixon invited them
to the White House last night so
he could express his appreciation
in person.-.
Asked what the next step might
be now on the appbropriation prob-
lem, Ziegler said he expects a
meeting of administration offic-
ials with members of the House
Appropriations Committee w it h
the objective of moving "to apopsi-
tian where an acceptable appro-
priation bill could be developed."
Charles Lee ,who headed a mas-
sive lobbying effort on behalf of
scores of education organizations
backing the extra funds, said the
fight will not be abandoned.
"There could be future vetoes of
the same bill," he said. The gal-
leries were packed with s c h o o l
teachers and principals, librarians,
and school people brought to
Washington to support the effort
to override the veto.
Just before the vote, two Re-
publican leaders put forward a
possible compromise that would
permit Congress to stand by the
increased funding but let Nixon
refuse to spend more than he
wanted to.

WASHINGTON (A) -The White
House announced yesterday that
Charles DiBona, a civilian defense
analysis expert, has been offered
the post of Selective Service di-
rector.
However, a final decision has
not been reached, Press Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said. Senate
sources reported earlier in the day
DiBona had been chosen.
If DiBona's appointment goes
through, he will succeed Gen.
Lewis B. Hershey, who has held
the post since World War II. Her-
shey is stepping down 'Feb. 18.
DiBona already has discussed
the appointment with the senior
members of the Senate .Armed
Services Committee, which would
consider his nomination by Presi-
dent Nixon.
He met on Monday with Sen.
John Stennis (D-Miss), the com-
mittee chairman, and Sen. Mar-
garet Chase- Smith (R-Maine),
the ranking Republican member.
The White House would not
confirm the appointment, saying
only that DiBona is under con-
sideration for the job from which
Hershey is to retire Feb. 16.
DiBona now is president of the
Center for Naval Analyses in near-
by Rosslyn, Va.
Aides of Dibona said yesterday
he was out of the city and his
whereabouts are not known.
Dibona, who will be 38 next
month, heads an organization
which performs operations re-
search and systems analysis for
the Navy. The center is affiliated
with the University of Rochester.
Dibona is a 1956 graduate of the
Naval Academy.
He spent part of his 7 years in
the Navy as a Rhodes scholar,
and left the services as a com-
mander in 1963.

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ROBERT BRESSON WEEKEND
"Never before in Ann Arbor"
THURSDAY-FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 30
THE TRIAL of JOAN of ARC
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By MARK DILLEN
The idea of a "free university"
for the community, long a goal of
some University students, has
been revived. Despite past failures,
this time organizers are hopeful
the attempt will succeed.
The new free university, sched-
uled to begin on Feb. 1, is aimed
at people who feel that grades or
requirements are not relevant.
There will be no grades, and any-
one will be able to teach any sub-
ject.
So far, 40 classes have been set
up including ESP, magic, sensitivi-
ty, candle-making, yoga, photog-
raphy, theology and pottery.
"When you don't have the pres-
sure of grades, education becomes
more of .a learning experience,"
said Liz Hunt, the program's co-
ordinator.
While several attempts have
been made in recent years at
starting a free university, all have
been short-livedl
With a semester of organization'
behind them and new people in-
volved, she feels tie chances for
success are great. "We feel we

have worked out the problems-
the reasons why it failed last
year," Miss Hunt said.
The structure of course will de-
pend largely on the wishes of the
class. "Our teachers are to be
more resource persons than what
is usually meant as a teacher,"
the program catalogue states.
Registration for free university
is taking place in the Fishbowl
and will continue until Saturday.

Czech conservatives purge
liberals in party shakedown

Yellow Sub-2:00 and 5:00
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SATURDAY AND SUNDAY ONLY
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.FANNY HILL" 'Ty--- Or

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TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
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sity year. Subseription rates: $10 by
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Bummer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mal.

VIENNA (A) - Lubomir
Strougal, a pro-Moscow, "hard-
line" leader took over the pre-
miership of Czechoslovakia yes-
terday, dashing the few remain-
ing hopes of liberalization of the
nation's government.
Strougal replaced Ol d r i c h
Cernik, who resigned suddenly.
Strougal's appointment w a s
made at a plenary session of
the Communist party Central
Committee in Prague.
Cernik was premier under lib-
eral Communist party chief
Alexander Dubcek, w h o s e re-
forms brought on the Soviet-
led invasion in August 1968. He
remained in the post after Dub-
cek was ousted last April.
In a shakeup affecting both
the Communist party and the
government, trade union chief
Karel Polacek and Stefan Sad-
ovsky, the Slovak party leader,
also resigned.
Although Strougal at one time
was counted among Dubcek's
supporters, his power returned
after the 1968 invasion.
The new premier is expected
to take harsh measures w i t h
the ailing Czechoslovak econ-
omy. He is known to believe

that the main reason for the
current shakiness of the econ-
omy - is bad morale among
workers.
Ota Sik, who planned econ-
omic reforms under Dubcek
and now lives in Switzerland,
yesterday forecast a gloomy ec-
onomic future f or Czechoslo-
vakia.
Sik saidinra radio interview
he felt his reforms would be
'wiped out and "politics in a
very negative sense will violate
economics." Sik was ousted
from the Czechoslovak Com-
munist party in October.
President Ludvik Svoboda re-.
placed Cernik, Polacek and Sa-
dovsky in the party presidium
with Antonin Kapek, first sec-
retary of the Prague city organ-
ization of the Communist party;
Josef Korack, chairman of the
Czech-state-National Front, and
Josef Lenart, premier in t h e
NoVotny era.
Josef Kempny, Czech state
premier until the shakeup, took
over Strougal's functions in the
Central Committee and as head
of Czech Communist party.
In Belgrade, Yugoslav ex-
perts on Czechoslovakia predict-

ed yesterday that as many as
400,000 members of the Czech-
oslovak Communist party will
be denied n e w membership
cards.
They predicted that the Cen-
tral Committee's session in Pra-
gue would 'launch a drastic
purge of the 1.7 million party
membership, which represents
more than 12 per cent of the
country's population.-afar
larger ratio than in any other'
East European Communist
country.
Th he Czechoslovak liberals
were eased out following.t h e
1968 invasion through a process
characterized by D u b c e k's
phased fall from power.
Dubcek was replaced last Ap-
ril as Communist party chief by
Gustav Husak. In September he
lost his post to the ruling Pres-
idium. At about the same time
he was removed as president of
parliament.
The following month, parlia-
ment reversed itself on the in-
vasion. Under the liberals it had
asked for withdrawal of the in-
vaders. In October 1969 it
thanked the Soviet-led Warsaw
Pact armies for invading the
country.

I

95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
PAST READING IS NOT DIPPICULT TO LEARN!

All those who completed courses held this
past year at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved
speeds of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same
or increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rates.
SEE H OW EASI LY YOU CAN:

'
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