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January 28, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DA1L.Y.

Wednesday, January 28, 197Q

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 28, 1970

f ter heart tranesplant
Gerald K. Rector; the world's third person to have had
wo heart transplant operations, died yesterday morning at
niversity Hospital.
Rector had received his third heart in an eight-and-a-
alf hour operation at the Hospital on Jan. 16. University
octors said he was in "very critical condition prior to the
peration as a result of his body's rejection of the first trans-
lanted heart, and kidney and liver .failure.
"If we had been able to find a donor 24 hours before we
id, in all likelihood we would have been able to save Mr.

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ft..
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if

COME

Pass-fal
effect
(Continued from Page 1)
and with pass-fail it doesn't make
any difference..
Pass-fail grading seems to pose'
the greatest danger for students
who do only marginally well in
languages. LSA Assistant D e a n
George Anderson cited the exam-
ple of a student who failed to
graduate last month because he
received a D in German, was given
a fail and consequently did not'
have the required number of cre-
dits.
It is also unclear what impact
pass-fail grading has had on stu-
dents' study habits.
"I don't think it really makes
that much 'difference," claimed
one teaching . fellow. "Students
work hard if they want to learn."
While some students agreed,
others said the fact that one only
needed a C to pass resulted in les
studying. "It takes some of the
pressure off," added another.
Some confusion has also devel-
oped whether students who receive
a D should continue the language
sequence. Under traditional grad-
ing, a student with a D or above
can take the higher level courses.
Originally, the language depart-
ments believed those students with
a fail would not be allowed to ;o
on to the next course, said Prof.
Clarence Pott, chairman of t h e
Germanic Languages department.
But. the latest decision lets the
individual language department
determine whether students with
a fail can continue, according to
LSA Assistant Dean Dean Baker.
There is also some doubt as to
the effectiveness of the language
departments' policy of keeping se-
cret from teachers which students
are taking their courses pass-fail.
"In .the past there were no
qualms about giving a D," said one
instructor. "If the teacher knows
the student is on pass-fail he pro-
bably would give the student the
benefit of the doubt.

Rector. The general deteriora-
tion of his kidneys and liver
prior to the second transplant"
on Jan. 16 led to problems we
were not able to correct," they
said in a prepared statement.
"In addition to the kidney and
liver failures, Mr. Rector devel-
oped a chest infection which he
was not able to overcome. His
heart continued to beat well up
until the very end," they added.
Rector had been moved this last
weekend from the Hospital's car.-
diac recovery room into the clini-
cal research unit as he began to
improve after the Jan. 16 trans-
plant. However, he developed the
lung infection early Monday.
Rector, who was from the Kala-
mazoo area, had become Mich-
igan's third heart transplant re-
cipient last March 17, after a
seven-hour operation at the Hos-
pital.
At that time,. University doctors
said "it was the hardest one we've
done," because of the difference
in size between the diseased heart}
and the donor heart. That opera-
tion took about two hours longer
than Michigan's two previous
heart transplants, both done at
University Hospital.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B l d g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. F o r more informa-
ti n, phone 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28
D ayCalendtar
Anatomy Semnar: Dr. J. D. Currey,
Univ. of York, England, "Structure and
Function in Bone and other Skele-,
tons" Rm. 4804 Medical Science II,
1:00 p.m.
School of Social Work and Depart-
ment of Psychology Joint Seminar:
Prof. Lee Rainwater, Harvard Univ.,
"Lower Class Family Patterns: Black
and White"; Rackham Amphithteater,
2 :00 p.m.
U of M Players: Lecture on Voice -
Miss Sophia Walsh, formerly actress in
Goetheanum of Dornach, Switzerland,
"Language and the Living Word," Arena
Theatre (1501) Frieze Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Zoology Seminar: Dr. 0. E. 'Schotte,
Amherst College, "Regeration of Limbs,
aCaprice of Nature or a General Pro-
perty of Organisms?" 1400 Chemistry
Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Engineering Interdepartmental Sem-
inar: Prof. Gebhart, Cornell Univ., "In-
stability and Transition in Natural
Convection: Very Recent Results", Rm.
325 W. Engineering Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: Dr. R. F. Ling,
Yale Univ., "Cluster Analysis" 2433 Ma-
son Hail, 4:00 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program (Phoen-
ix Theatre): The Criminals (U.S. Pro-

rfessional Premiere): Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
University Players (Department of
Speech): Dark ofthe Moon: Trueblood
Theater,8:00 p~m.
Chamber Arts Series: Music Fr o m
Marlboro: Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30
p.m.
General Notices
SUMMARY OF ACTION,
SGC MEETING; -
Approved: The SGC endorse Student
Mobilization Committee and allocate
$100 to help publicize strike of Gen-
eral Electric employees and urge boy-
cott of all GE products.
Approved: The SGC allocate $15 to
Young Socialist Alliance for Committee
Against Terrorist Attacks.
Approved: That SGC send letter to
Al Warrington inviting him to the next
SGC meeting.
Ap'proved: WHEREAS: The City of
Ann Arbor is considering the extension
of Observatory to the corner of Forest
and South University; and WHEREAS:
The proposed extension would destroy
the residential character of the Observ-
atory area; and WHEREAS: The pro-
posed extension would make pedestrian
traffic from Markley., and University
Terrace difficult and dangerous; and
WHEREAS : The University has stated
that "the proposed Observatory exten-
sion represents the best solution to the
traffic problems affecting the area,"
and "the University would like to re-
affirm the pressing need for this pro-
ject which is felt by our faculty, staff
and students." BE IT RESOLVED
THAT: Student Government Council
strongly opposes 'any .extension of Ob-
servatory; and That SGC requests im-
mediate action to route hospital traffic
to the north side of the hospital, so as
to relievethe pressure n Observatory;
E E IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT:

Approved: That Bruce Wilson a n d i_
Dennis Webster be authorized to nego- New York City Jobs, applications due
tiate for the purchase ofhauses, where Feb. 3 for positions in many areas, get
such purchase might be accomplished applic. and information at Career Plan-
without large cost to SOC. No such ning.
purchase is to be completed - without
-os..'.nti'. . ~~rw.fl 01 1.2. 51'.. U t.l.

specuic approval oz vouncta

Defeated: That SGC demands that
President Fleming only consider to be
valid candidates for the vice-presidency
those chosen by the Search Committee;
and: That SGS suggests that if Presi-
dent Fleming feels he is unable to make
a decision to the Regents by their
February meeting that he find some
more expedient agency to handle that'
responsibility.
Approved: WHEREAS: The Regents in
their recent redraft of Bylaws 7.03 to
7.09 have indicated that they do not
feel that student should have author-
.ity over their own personal conduct,
or major responsibility for setting pol-
icy in the University office established
specifically to serve them, or any pol-
icy making influence in academic af-
fairs; WHEREAS: There is no demo-
cratic decision-making mechanism by
which the student body can overrule
this arbitrary and irresponsible attack
on them; WHEREAS: The only choices
for action left open are submission to
the "good will" f authority or resist-
ance in ways utside the normal chan-
nels of decision-making; WHEREAS:
Submission to authority will only sup-
press conflict to the disadvantage of
students, and not resolve it; RESOLV-
ED: 1) SGC holds the Board of Re-
gents responsible for any use of extra-
ordinary means in reversing their de-
cision; 2) SGC urges all students and
groups who wish to exercise and self-
determination over their lives in the
University to attend the next Regents'
meeting and indicate in a peaceful but
unmistakable way their demand that
the Regents pass a set of bylaws which
protect students' rights; 3) If the Re-
gents persist in ignoring the legitimate
complaints of students, SGC urges that
the student body make known its will
in a way that cannot be ignored, by
making it impossible for the Regents
to meet in public; 4) If the Regents
succeed in passing bylaws, which dele-
gate authority over student conduct
to anyone but students as a whole or
their elected representatives, SGC com-
mits itself to organize a campaign or
deliberate and systematice non-com-
pliance with all regulations under that
illegitimate delegation of authority, in-
cluding but not limited to the continu-
1. 101 nn oRegen mectin. .

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB
Interview today: Jan. 28:
Camp Tamarack, Fresh Air Soc.,. De-
troit, cabin couns., spec. waterfront,
arts AR crafts, nature craft, tripping,
dramatics, dance, music, unit and asst.
unit supv, caseworker, truck-bus driv-
er, nurses. kitchen porter, counselors
with emotionally disturbed and for
marionette theater. Tamarack will be
here Wed., Jan. 28, Thurs., Jan. 29 and
Fri., Jan. 30.
Institute for Creative Studies, Chevy
Chase, Md. graduates and undergrads
for campus research projects on stu-
dent rebellion and black studies pro-
grams.

SGC condemns the action of the Uni-
versity in devoting itself to the smooth
flow of cars rather than the welfare
of students.

Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.

"
100 Students needed for
psychological skill conlest.
Approximate ime required,
1 / hours.. ,.. $3.00
Plus $1.00, $5.00, and $25.00
prize bonuses for winning
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28
Rm. 3RS, Union
J & H INTERNATIONAL CORP, CHICAGO

A

for information call
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

"

p 3

g

I f you're.
CH ICK EN
Then don't join
the DAILY

.!N.

Fleming
dropped

case

(Continued from Page 1)
have had the responsibility for
lecting the fine.

col-

Bush said he withdrew the
charges because he was unsure
how effective they could be at this
time.
"The other complainants and I
decided it was pretty futile since
SGC probably couldn't punish
Fleming anyway," he said.
"It would be a good idea to get
everyone in the University under
the student courts, but with peo-
ple getting offed and students
going to jail there are more im-
portant things to do than playing
with the student courts" Bush
concluded.
Read and Use
'Daily Clssi feds

'U' struck by second
electrical blackout

(Continued from Page 1)
the University Hospital carries the
University power facilities and was
not affected by the blackout.
Many students, it seems, used
the half hour loss as an excuse
to skip class.. "When I woke up at
what I thought was 8:30 and found
out it was really 9, I figured I
couldn't possibly make my 9
o'clock class, anyway," comment-
ed one freshman woman. "So I
just went back to sleep.'
"I really enjoyed the other

blackouts, too," she added. "It
gave me a chance to use my
candles."
However, the power blackout did
cause, a few problems, at least for
one student, who was on his way
to a trial for the LSA sit-in. "I'd
left my room at what I thought
was 8:10, 20 minutes before my
trial," he explained. "But when I
passed the clock at the bank, it
said 8:40, and I really panicked.
I got to my trial late, but the
Judge had slept late, anyway."

(It takes guts to tolerate our staff !
$10 per mouQth '
; ~FREE Service and Deliery
---NO DEPOSIT REQ'UI RED---
662-5671j
~SER VING BIG 0 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961j
{ >"fi3,. M h1 .tiJ\Y. vi, T.4 : ::...... . FwM... I .. ..4. 0< '...,h.\.> ' n.v .... 14.
'is' Speial Purhas
.'.i';'
CHAIR $22.00
Round Corduroy
CUSHON 3.9
Cuddy, Frry il~o-Speial-3.n
11 .CTH ECi
WICKER
{ WORKS G

Paraphernalia
M&F 10-9; TWT 10-7; S. 10-6
215 S. State

i.i

1!!

. q

I

lrig Ct1ST'UpLZOri O tce etti utcc ,,,g.

. _.......... _.. .
M

$

WEDNESDAY FORUM
REVOLUTIONS IN RELIGIOUS
CELEBRATIONS
MARK HARRIS-Canterbury House
FR. GERALD FLANNERY-Newman Center
RABBI GERALD GOLDMAN-The House
JANUARY 28, 8 P.M.
at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL STREET

p. ___- -_---

fr

ROUND TRIP BOEING 707

JET

I

STOLEN: One Wolverine skin
on blue and yellow mounting
Please return, no questions asked.

SPONSORED BY:
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
A Non-Profit Student Organization
UNIVERSITY CHA-RTERS 6TH ANNUAL CHARTER FLIGHT SERIES

All Non-Stop Jet Flights
Complete Meals and Complimentary Drinks
Detroit Departures from near-by Metro Airport
Deposit will hold seat. Final payment in March
Cancellation privileges until departure

I

Box 69, Michigan Daily
420 Maynard

1

Students international provides you the opportunity
to become aware of Europe, the Far East, and ar-
rangements can be made for the world, Through
individual programs (see Program below) or in-
clusive tours, intra-European student flights, inter-

national 1.D. cards, Eurail and Brit-rail passes, auto
purchases, leases, rentals, connecting transporta-
tion, travelers checks, associated student travel
bureaus, we will try to assist you.

CAREER POSITIONS IN NURSING
The University of Michigan Medical Center
is presently interviewing registered nurses
and licensed practical nurses for career po-
sitions. Our 1200 bed facility has a general
hospital, a psychiatric hospital, and a re-
cently completed Mott Children's Hospital.
We offer you the opportunity to work in your
specialty area with a alary rate and benefit
program which -ranks among the: finest in

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 1970 PROGRAM
DETROIT METRO DEPARTURES

To
London
London
London
London.
London
London
Paris
Japan

2
3
4
5
6
10

Depairt
May 4
May 5
May 15
June. 21
June 26
July 5
May 6
July 16b

WIeeks
5
7.
12
8
a.8
8
7
b

Return
June 9
June 25
Aug. 20
Sept. 2
Aug. 26
Aug. 30
June 23
Aug. 31

Cost
$189
199
209
229
229
229
169
419

NEW YORK DEPARTURES

London
London
La_ _

7
8

May 5
May 14
I.. . IA

7
13

J)une 24
Aug. 14d
00t 2

1 89
199
189.

,

II

El

41

rdon 9 June 14 a -' '~v."Y .

V!

II

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