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January 28, 1970 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-28

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PRONE: 764-0554

5th Week
shows ot
1,3,5;-,9

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5-6290

Wednesday, January 28, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
I ' ___I

William Faulkner's Pulitzer Prize-
Novel "The Reivers" is now a
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
ioyous sense of life and laugh-
ter, A marvelous time is had by
all."--New York Magazine;:;
Steve McQueen
~The Reivers
with
SHARON FARRELL
and WILL GEERNEXT

HELD OVER!
2nd WEEK...

NO 2-6264 SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:30
The Most Explosive Spy Scandal of the Century!

W the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service.
S THEWITHDRAWAL of 50,000 more American troops from
Vietnam will begin today.
The U.S. Command announced the withdrawal will begin with ....
3,000 Marines from 19 units leaving over a five-day period, the re-
mainder following before April 15.
The withdrawal will raise to 10,000 the number of troops pulled"
out sine.President Nixon announced the first manpower reduction
The announcement came as allied headquarters reported sixY
clashes with Viet Cong forces ranging from the southern Mekong
Delta to jungles near the Cambodian border north of Saigon. 59 North
Vietnamese, three Americans, and five South Vietnamese were re-
ported killed.
* * *.
SUPREME COURT NOMINEE G. HARROLD CARSWELL
told the Senate Judiciary Committee that he is not a racist.
"I have no notions, secretive, open or otherwise, of racial superior-x
ity," swore the 50-year-old appeals court judge.
Yesterday's opening day of hearings on his nomination centered
chiefly on Carswell's racial views. Carswell replied to questions con-
cerning press reports detailing a speech the Georgian native gaven
in 1948 in a losing race for the state legislature in which he affirmed -Associated Press
a belief in white supremacy, Carswell defends views
Carswell was also heavily questioned about reports that he had
helped switch an all-white Tallahasse Fla, golf club to private owner- Supreme Court nominee G. Harrold Carswell responds to ques-
ship in 1955 to avoid integration. tions -efore the Senate Judiciary Committee. In the first of the
Retreating from an earlier testimony in which he denied having hearings on the nominations senators focused on reports of
any administrative affiliation, Carswell admitted that he had been Carswell's allegedly racist views.
"an incorporator" of the club.

NiXOn returns
H EW bill for
WASHINGTON A)- Following up a dramatic, televised
veto, President Nixon sent back to Congress yesterday a bill
appropriating federal spending for education and health, and
a Republican leader said the GOP would rally to sustain the
President's action.
The President told Congress he vetoed the $19.7 billion
Health-Education-Labor appropriation bill because it would
feed inflation, foster inefficiency and misdirect money.
Congress had boosted the bill nearly $1.3 billion beyond
the level Nixon had recommended.
Congress now faces the decision whether to override the

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE " TECIINCOIOR'

II

Alpha Kappa Psi
(Grad. Business)

Phi Delta Phi
(Law Fraternity)

invite
U of M COE DS
to a
T. G.

i

Thursday, Jan.29
at the
"PH ID" Hocse
Thompson at Madison
(Next to South Quad)

9-11 P.M.

*. * *
EGYPT REPORTS its commandos have destroyed an Israeli
military headquarters in Sinai, but Israel denies the claim.
The Egyptian high command announcement says that one of its
rocket command crossed into Sinai, "destroying most of the encamp-
ment and equipment" and killing a large number of Israeli soldiers.
The announcement described the Sinai headquarters "one of the
most important military targets, since it holds command over the
entire Sinai army positions as well as the Gaza strip."
Israelis military spokesmen counter the reported rocket attack
actually hit a deserted strip near a settlement far to the north,
"causing no damage or casualties whatsoever.''
* * *
THE FEDERAL GRAND JURY INVESTIGATION of the
murder of the Yablonski family opened with the testimonies of
relatives of both the slain and the accused.
Kenneth and Joseph Yablonski, sons of the slain United Mine
Workers insurgent leader, each testified for about 15 minutes and
then left without comment.
The Yablonski brothers have said they feel the killings were an
outgrowth of their father's unsuccessful bid for the UMW presidency.
Also testifying were the mother and sister-in-laws of Paul E.
Gilly, one of the three accused men.

By CHRIS UHL
In a cluster of cabins in Orton-
ville, Michigan a number of stu-
dents discussed peace as a way of
life in a retreat last weekend. The
two-day event was sponsored by
Hillel House and the Center for
Research on Conflict Resolution.
A panel on peace and the inter-
national scene and a variety of
workshops were the main events of
the retreat. Returning students
brought back differing evaluations
f these activities.

.!1

RETREA T:
Group gathers, holds'
discussions on peace

You Earn 24 Hours of Every Day...

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By ROBERT WILLARD
"You know I started B a c h
Club because I wanted to meet
girls," explains Bach Club
Founder and President R a n -
dolph Smith in a soft-spoken
drawl.
In three years the tall, goateed
graduate student has pioneered
the club from eight to almost
75 members.
When he came to the Univer-
sity three years ago he felt a
definite need for more mixing
among students. "It has not
been easy,' 'he sighs. "Once
you have been what you are
and you are not successful, no
matter what you do, you have
lost old members."
But Joe Marcus '71 threw in
his artistic talent on posters and
they started serving jelly do-
nuts and allowing more time af-
ter the program for mixing. A
summer Bach Club r member
suggested they pass out leaflets
at registration. Suddenly a t -

tendance skyrocketed and Bach
Club was a going thing.
Roughly 75 people gathered
last Wednesday night at the
Campus Chapel to groove to
classical music and Prof. Thom-
as Taylor of the music school.
After an unexpectedly large
number of late arrivals, the
stereo rolled on, hummed on,
turned on and turned off to a
reserved audience. There were
the usual plague of fidgets the
last half hour as the club heard
portions of Beethoven's Ninth
Symphony over an ancient,
scratchy monoraul record play-
er.
But after the program most
people stayed around for the re-
freshments.
The Bach Club's humorous
posters have attracted the most
people. "I saw their posters at
one of the record shops - it
was really good," admitted Ro-
bert Lowenstein. "I've always
been interested in Beethoven.

STUDENTS SWING
Bac lub A lasiamxe

Tonight's meeting helped me to
"bone-up" on the specifics of
the 9th symphony - it opens up
a new field," said Randy Holm-
es. And other guys just like jelly
donuts.
"The club could always use
more people," said Smith, "I
wish people would get off their
asses and go out and do things,
i.e., Bach Club. So many stu-
dents like to come but never get
around to it. Often people go to
one or two meetings, they don't
like it that nobody talks to them
or they d6n't meet the love of
their life and give up."
In a word, Bach Club is a
mixer. All that is suggested is
that you enjoy classical music -
some of the officers of the club
can not read music and h a v e
never played an instrument. Ac-
cording to a regular member,
Fred Shadko, "The less y o u
know about music, the more you
can learn in the Bach Club."

Andy Hoffman, who attended a
workshop on the Middle East con-
flict commented, "Nothing was re-
solved. We skipped from one topic
to the next. I didn't get too much
out of it, but it was interesting."
Jim Morganstern expressed dis-
satisfaction over the results of an-
other workshop.
'Everybody was trying to ex-
pound his own philosophy. Many
of the people didn't even know
where the discussion was headed,"'
he said.
This was not the reaction of all
the participants, however. There
were those who found the work-
shops invigorating.
"People came up here confused.
They were supporting the estab-
lishment. Now after the panel and
workshops they are beginning to
realize that the establishment
ways have failed," Larry Schwartz
said.
"It is becoming clear to them
that we need a new approach-a
new way to resolve conflict, a bet-
ter way to find peace," he added.
A rift became apparent between
those seeking inner-peace and
those more interested in peace in
a broad political sense.
Michael Latka a chemistry
major from Hillsdale College said,
"You have to first possess an in-
ner-peace before you can hope to
affect a universal peace.,,
"I feel like I have been attend-
ing a history class or a sociology
class," Latka added. "I interpreted
the title of the retreat, 'Peace as
a Way of Life' to mean peace as a
personal way of life.".
Midway through the weekend,
Rabbi Gerald Goldman of Hillel
House sensing the need for a more
personal approach to the peace
problem, held a special gathering
to discuss the topic of inner-peace.
For many the exchange was the
highlight of the retreat.
Goldman opened the session by
emphasizing the need to establish
priorities. He spoke of students as
beging bouhd down by obligations.
"It is necessary for the student
to weed out the unimportant
obligations and to set up prior-
ities," Goldman said. He suggested
people as a first priority.

veto or to write a new appro-
priation bill closer to Nixon's
recommendations.
It would take a two-thirds vote
in both branches to overrule the
Nixon veto and make the present
bill law.
Sen. Hugh Scott, (R-Pa.) said
Republicans in the House or if
necessary, in the Senate will side
with Nixon in numbers sufficient
to block an effort to override the
veto. He acknowledged the GOP
will have to enlist some Democrat-
ic support.
"I would expect the veto to be
sustained in the House and, if not
there, in the Senate," Scott said.
Scott said Republicans anti-
cipate 125 to 130 GOP votes to
sustain Nixon in the House, "and
sufficient fiscally concerned Dem-
ocrats to provide the margin."
The House is expected to take
up Wednesday the veto of a bill
which it passed on Dec. 20 on a
vote of 261 to 110.
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana said, how-
ever, there is a good chance Nixon
would be overruled in the Senate,
if the issue gets there.
"If the House overrides, I think
our prospects would be fairly
good," he said. "If the House does
not override, that's the end of
the ball game."
If the veto is sustained Congress
will have to write another bill, and
it is expected that the Democrats
will again put in more money for
some programs than Nixon wants,
leading to another confrontation.
Nixon offered little in the way
of compromise to gain additional
support.
Some legislators had expected
him to give a bit on his opposition
to a $600 million item for grants
to schools in areas where large
numbers of children of federal em-
ployes and servicemen attend
them. The figure was nearly $400
million more than the administra-
tion had recommended.
Nixon promised only to study
the program and make recom-
mendations later.
The bill contains $1.7 billion for
HEW, nearly $1 billion for Labor
and 1.9 billion for OEO.-Money for
nearly a dozenosmaller agencies
comprised the balance of the $19.7
billion figure.

Vote set

LANSING (A)-The State House
of Representatives will vote today
on a controversial parochiaid bill
which would make all private
schools eligible for state aid of
about $25 million.
Both Democrats and Republi-
cans, however, agreed that one key
vote-scheduled by the House yes-
terday-will not resolve the issue.
The House defeated parochiaid
last May, but the Senate approved
it in September after Gov. William
Milliken endorsed the concept in
his special education reform
package.
In paving the way for the vote
tomorrow, the' House agreed to
postpone consideration of several
other related proposals until after
deciding how it stands on the basic
concept of parochiaid.
But that sum is expected to be
reduced to 23 million if the prin-
ciple of granting public funds to
church-run schools is approved.
In a report released last Jan-
uary, the Joint Legislative Com-
mittee on Non-Public Schools said
it would cost the state less money
to provide state aid for non-public
schools now than it will to educate
non-public school students in pub-
lic school later.
University officials are waiting
for the outcome of the parochiaid
vote and the vote on the rest of
Milliken's budget before com-
menting on Milliken's assertion
that the state's public institutions
of higher education must cut their
budgets or risk having it done for
them in Lansing.
"We'll just have to wait until
Milliken actually turns in his bud-
get," Smith added. However, the
vice president has already pre-
dicted the need for a tuition hike
to supplement the University's
budget.

with 5% Special Passbook Savings at
Ann Arbor Bank. Continuous compounding
does it. Isn't it time to look into it?
Member F.O.I.C.

ANNARBOR BANK
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WiITMOE LAKE
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION **FEDERAL. RESERVE SYSTEMA

Drug bill to include
'no-knock' provision

NED'S

ANN ARBOR BLUES FESTIVALS
GENERAL MEETING
SUNDAY, FEB. 1 ,4 P.M.
SOME COMMITTEE POSITIONS STILL OPEN
QUESTIONS: 7/69-0594 or 665-8736

BOOKSTORE

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the 'University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
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Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

WASHINGTON ()-The Sen-
ate voted Monday to retain in
a pending drug control bill a
clause allowing federal narcotics
agents to stage no-warning
raids.
The idea is to prevent suspects
from destroying narcotic evi-
dence while raiding officers wait
outside the door to get in.
The action came as the Sen-
ate aproved, 70 to 15, an amend-
ment offered by Assistant Re-
publican Leader Robert P. Grif-
fin of Michigan.
The Grifin amendment to the
administration-backed drug con-
trol bill permits issuance of such
"no-knock" warrants. But it
adds some restrictions to ease
doubts some senators have ex-
pressed that no-knock raids vio-

late the Fourth Amendment's
guarantee of privacy and pro-
tection from unreasonable search
and seizure.
Moments before, the Senate
beat back twin attempts by Sen.
Sam J. Ervin (D-NC), to kill
the Griffin amendment and to
substitute his own language al-
lowing no-warning raids only if
officers at the scene determined
that without it, vital evidence
was certain to be destroyed.
Also defeated was an amend-
ment by Sen. Harold E. Hughes
(D-Iowa), which would lower
substantially the maximum pen-
alties for use of marijuana.
Hughe's subcommittee on alco-
holism and narcotics has been
studying the issue.

YPSILANTI

This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.

prse htn-kokrisvo stdin.h:ise

RADICAL
FILM+ SERIES

TEN DAYS THAT SHOAK

10% OFF

Presents

ON ALL BOOKS

THE WORLD
Directed by: SERGE EISENSTEIN

(also known as OCTOBER)
SILENT 1928

ANN ARBOR'S
BRIGHTEST
NIGHTSPOT

Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.-12:5:30
We think we're interesting-

.among the movie offerings , , , indisputably the most significant . . .replete with magnificent scenes of mass movement,
with amazingly observed characters, and with extremely striking and beautiful camera shots . . . a brilliant director."--Nation
. . .epic substance . . ."-Theatre Arts
Ten Days That Shook the World is a film classic, It portrays the Russian Revolution as seen by Eisenstein, himself a participant in
the Revolution, who in the years which followed became the foremost film director in Russia. It was made as an "intellectual film"
-an example of Communist art.
"The legitimate function of art is a purely a practical one; its purpose is solely to produce convictions and to lead to actions. Dur-
ing the Revolution, for exomnI its duty was to nrovoke revolutioraorv act. PponI went from the theatre or th cinemn tn the

DON BAILEY

the f,

C

We hope you will.

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