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January 27, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-27

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THE tVt(CH(GAN DA1 Y

fiuesdc y ,1Qnuary 27, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 27, 1970

0 PARTICIPATE:
U' legal aid experiment gives
sindents credit for clinic work

13 lack outDAILY OFFICIAL

- r
[Continued from Page f)

BULLETIN
s . . :..::.. ::: . ... ;.
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publidation of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to

Delta, Delta, Delta offers its annual
r scholarship for any undergraduate Wo-
man;plck up applications and info
from Mrs. Lyons, 2011 SAB; must be
returned by Mar. 1.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:

}

Law students' work at a legal
aid clinic could become more than
an extracurricular activity, a Uni-
versity experiment suggests.
If properly done, many unique
educational benefits may be foundt
in a course that offers academic
credit for work at a legal clinic,1
reports Prof. James J. White who.
conducted such an experimental
course last summer. t
However, he adds, the experi-
ment would require further evalu-'
ation by "observers more objective
than I."
Although some 100 law students
work at the Washtenaw County
Legal Aid Clinic each semester,
their work is under the supervision
of staff attorneys and is com-
pletely voluntary.
In the experimental course,
however, students worked under
Prof. White's direction and for
academic credit. Ten students,
chosen randomly from 25 appli-
cants, put in a combined total of
1,73 hours of work on behalf of,
97 clients.
White,who has long been active
in the local clinic's work, notes
that "clinical law, and especially
clinical law practiced on behalf
of the poor, promises to be the
darling not only of our students
but also of the foundations and
the federal government. And the
latter two will doubtless entice all
of us into a mindless and unbe-
coming scramble to spend their
money."
But, he cautions, "it will take
more careful planning and more
thoughtful analysis than anyone
has yet offered to insure that suchf
money is spent in an efficient' and
effective way."

White says that in his course
students learned "very little sub-
stantive law." Although individual
students learned a great deal from
intensive research on specific
cases, "I am not sure that the
clinic setting is an efficient one
for teaching substantice legal prin-
ciples."
Nor, White adds, was there much
evidence that the clinical experi-
ence taught students "social
awareness" Some people argue that
'the skin-flinted conservative car
be made into a compassionate lib-

eral by an eight-week or ten-week
exposure to legal aid practice," he
says. "I saw nothing in my stu-.
dents nor have I seen anything in
our volunteer students of past'
years which supports that thesis."'
"It is my impression that the'
quality of legal work is quite un-
related to the student's political
philosophy, and that exposure to
legal aid clients is just as likely
to i einforce a student's negative
views of the poor as it is to alter
those views," White says.-

New coffeehouse
opens in Union M1'UG

(Continued from Page 1)
week, and the crowd was still
larger the next week, the man-
agers say.
Student patrons especially seem
to like the informal atmosphere
at the coffeehouse. Performers
donate their time and talent, and
Ludner, claims they are just as
enthusiastic as the patrons.
The coffeehouse tries to have
at least two acts arranged for each
Friday evening. Performers from
the audience are welcome to come
up to the stage between regularly
scheduled sets.
"The way to keep this thing
going, is to keep it relatively un-
structured," says Ludner.
UAC will secure any equipmentI
a performer needs. All talent is
welcome, although the bulk so far

HEW bill veto may cut'
U' research, ed funds

(Continued from Page 1)
would be felt in research and spe-
:ialized training pr'ograms for
graduate students. HEW is the
largest sponsor of these programs,
he explained.
Meanwhile, one section of the
bill touched the sensitive area of
sanctions for participants in dis-
ruptions at universities.
The provision would have cut
off federal loans or grants to stu-
Ribjcoff talks
(Continued from Page 3)
his own admission - and the ma-
jor point of his prepared speech --
that there has been a failure of
leadership in the country, a fail-
ure to lead an attack on the prob-
lems that face the nation.
*Nixon was one main target. In
a press conference before speak-
ing at Hill Auditorium, Ribicoff
said the President's apparently
" successful courting of the "silent
majority" was a hollow political
victory.
"The silent majority agrees with
President Nixon and that helps
politically, but that does not solve
any problems," he said. "Educa-
tion, health, pollution are n o t
eliminated as problems by Nix-
on's speeches..
Picking up on a major theme-
Democrats have used since Nix-
on's State of the Union message,
Ribicoff complained that "specif-'
ics are lacking. There are no plans
to solve the problems."
Ribicoff managed to be biparti-
san in his attack. "The DemocratsI
have not shown much leadership
either," he s a i d. "It is lacking
from both parties."
Asked about the prospects of
leadership in the '70s, Rubicoff
s a i d he saw Nixon and Agnew
continuing to lead the GOP, while
many Democratic senators - Mc-
Govern, Muskie, Hughes, Nelson
and Phil Hart - appeared to be
contenders for leadership.

-ents, faculty members, or univer-
sity employes convicted of taking
part in university disruptions in
which there was force, the threat
of force or seizure of property.
It is expected that this section
would be included in a redrafted
appropriations bill.
University President Robben
Ileming said last night that the
University is currently discussing
with 'attorneys the implications.
f the proposed' law on students
sonvicted of creating a contention
in the sit-in at the LSA Bldg. last
September.
Among the programs thatbwould
be affected by an HEW budget
cut is the education school's ur-
ban education program. Instituted
last July 1, the program receives
all of its operating funds-$500,000
-from the federal government,
according to Dean Wilbur Cohen
of the education school.
Cohen, who served as Secretary
of Health, Education and Welfare
under the Johnson administration,
said last night he has contacted
ten members of Congress and
urged them to override the Presi-
dent's veto.
Cohen criticized Nixon for turn-
ing the HEW dispute into "an
issue of financial integrity."
"If he was so concerned about
financial integrity, why did he
recommend so much money for
the ABM?" he asked.
In addition to the urban educa-
tion program, federal funding of
the University's public health re-
search and training programs re-
mains uncertain.
Dean Myron Wegman of the
public health school expressed
concern last night that a reduc-
tion of the HEWV budget may im-
pose restrictions on both the pres-
ent and future operation of the
school, which is currently receiv-
ing $640,000 from the department.
Even if Congress overrides the
veto, Wegman explained, the Pres-
ident's attitude indicates a prob-
able cutback in the HEW budget
request for the next fiscal year.
Nixon's budget requests for the
1971 fiscal year, which starts June
30, are expected to be submitted
to Congress shortly.

have been folk singers, Miss Kelley
adds.
The coffeehouse offered five-
cent Cokes this past weekend and
Szpiech hopes it can serve sand-
wiches in the near future. Cur-
rently open from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
on Friday nights, the coffeehouse
may open on Saturday nights
starting this week if its sponsors
can get Union permission, he adds.
iMiss Kelley and Szpiech say they
may try to expand hours into the
weekuights, and Ludner adds that
the Union bowling alleys and bil-
liard area may stay open longer
to supplement the coffeehouse.
In the spirit of last year's report
on the Union by Douglas Osterheld
of the University of Wisconsin,
the Union now houses the Student
Credit Union and the Student dis-
count store.
The Osterheld report recom-
mended reordering and redirect-
ing the Union's facilities to serve
the needs of students to avoid
greater financial losses.
Pending the report of the Union
Space Allocation Committee, the
Union may also take on student
organizations offices and use the'
current MUG for the new student'
bookstore.
asks talks.
a s
on TF sudy
Senate Assembly's Academic Af-
fairs Committee yesterday request-
ed Graduate Assembly to send a
group of teaching fellows to dis-
cuss with it the propriety of the
committee's proposed investiga-
tion into the employment condi-
tions of University teaching fel-
lows.
The propriety of the committee's
investigation has been brought in-
to question by the announcement
last Thursday that petitions would
be filed this week with the State
Employment Relations Commis-
sion for the establishment of a
teaching fellows union.
Prof. Theodore Buttrey, com-
mittee co-chairman, said that un-
der state 'labor law, such an in-
vestigation while a union is filing
for recognition might be illegal.

Students in groups of five or,
six strolledacross campus, view-
ing the extent of the failure and
joking about the possible meaning
of it all.
"This is it, the revolution is
here," said one participant buoy-c
antly. One group attempted to
rally students on the Diag in aI
mass protest over the blackout.
"This is repression," shouted one3
girl with an army jacket a n d
braids. "No, this is fun," countered
someone nearby.
But the protest organizers wereE
not easily put off. "Rally on the
Diag," they shouted. "We demand'
an administration answer to all
this. The lights were turned off forj
a reason."
A passerby stopped to point out
that President Robben Fleming
was also affected -candles were
seen in the windows of his South
University Ave. home. The organ- .
isers quickly turned to other tac-
tics, pelting the intruder with a:
barrage of icy cnowballs.
"To North Hall," cried one,
and off they went. Once there,
however, they found they had
company. Uniformed officers were
standing in the windows on three
sides, watching for possible inci-
dents of "trashing."
Women at Betsy Barbour and
Helen Newberry residences dug,
out candles for emergency light-j
ing. "This is fun, this is a r e a l
panic," said one woman guard-I
ing the door. "Lots of the girls
are upstairs telling ghost stories."
In East Quad, students found
other diversions. "East Quad was
blacked out, so we all lit up" quip-
ped one student.
And in Helen Newberry lounge,
a student sat in front of a useless
picture tube with a very useful
girlfriend snuggled up to him, hop-
ing the blackout would last for-
ever.
Prof. Charles V. Hamilton, who
co-authored Black Power: The
Politics of Liberation in Amer-
ica, with Stokeley Carmichael,
will speak on "Institutional Rac-
ism in America" at 8 p.m. to-
night in Rackham Aud.
The lecture is being sponsored
by the Afro-American Studies
Program and is open to the public.

Center for Coordination of Ancient
and Modern Studies and Dept..of Near
Eastern Languages & ' Literatures Joint
Lecture: Ignace J. Gelb, HixonProfes-
sor of Assyriology. Univ. of Chicago,
"From Freedom to Slavery" Auditorium
A, Angela Hall, Jan. 29, 4:10 p.m.

disturbed, and marionette theater.
Jan. 28: Institute for Creative Stu-
dies, Chevy Chase. Md. 1-5 p.m.: grad-
uates and undergrads for work on cam-
pus projects, student rebellion, and
black studies program studies.
Jan. 30: Camp Tamarack, see above.

nl

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U-M COLLEGE

-4

REPUBLICAN CL UB
Presents:
PROF Ha ADe1 E
(GOP Candidate for Mayor in 1968)

1
3
1

Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g ., before All spring graduates interested in
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub- work with the Federal Gov't. should
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for apply to take the next FSEE test: get
Saturday andySunday. Items ap- applic. at Career Planning, file be-
pear once only. Student organiza- for Feb. 10 for test on Feb. 21.
tion notices a r e not accepted for Professional Trainee opportunities
publication. F o r more informa- for college graduates in areas of per-
ti -n, phone 764-9270. sonnel, mgmt. anal., budget, urban
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27 plan. econ., arch., engr., math, hous-
7 aing, redevelopment, public health educ,
.Day a en. ;pubI. health sanitation, and others, BA
Wind Instrument Department Re- and MA may qualify by sending ap-
cital: School of Music Recital Hall, plication before Feb. 3. Applic. at Ca-
11:30 a.m. reer Planning.
Department of Computer and Com- Princeton University announces in-
munication Sciences Colloquium: J. C. tern teacher program leading to cer-
King, I.B.M., "The Concept of a Ver- tification, summer session, June 22-July
ifying Compiler", Rm. 4051 LS&A, 4:00 31, apply before April 6.
p~rm. Family Service Association of America
Computer Lecture: Prof. Thomas J. announces ftnancia grants for study
Schriber, Grad. School of BAusiness in grad schools of social work through-
Administration "Development and De- ut the country. Director at Career
scription of Algorithms": Natural Sci- Planning.
ence Auditorium, 7:00 p.m. SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
Student Assembly meeting, Tues., Jan. 212 SAB, Lower Level
27, 1017 Angell Hall, 7:30 p.m. Interviews held at Summer Place-
Professional Theatre Program (Phoen- ment on the following dates:
ix Theatre): The Criminals (U.S. Fro- January 28: Camp Tamarack, F r e s h
fessional Premiere): Lydia Mendelssohn Air Society, Detroit, cabin counselors,
Theater, 8:00 p.m. spec. i waterfront, arts & crafts, na-
Degree Recital: Philip Bunker, organ: ture craft, tripping, dramatics, dance,
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m. music; unit and asst. unit supv., case-
General ';otices worker, truck-bus driver, nurses, port-
Gene al N~ aee ;er-kitchen, counselors with emotionally

COME
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Approximate time required,
/2zhours. ....$3.0O
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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28
Rm. 3RS, Union
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Help us shatter
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Until recently-Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass
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Until recently -'we were known as pro-
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at it. See our representative,
FEBRUARY 3,1970

"A CRITICAL LOOK
AT THE HARRIS
ADMINISTRATION"
WED., JAN. 28

7:30 P.M.

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M&F 10-9; TWT 10-7; S 10-6
215 S. State
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ALL INYITED
(For Information or Membership call
.761-7270)

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TOLED0, OH1043624

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is nOw accepting petitions for new board
.members. Sign up for an interview and'
pick up your petition at the bulletin board,
first floor SAB. Interviews will be held on
January 26-27.

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STUCK WITH AN
APAR TMENT TO SUBLET
FOR THIS SUMMER?
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Michigan Daily's "Student Housing Guide"

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The quickest and easiest
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CAREER POSITIONS IN NURSING
The University of Michigan Medical Center
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We offer you the opportunity to work in your
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Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.

10% OFF

ON A LL BOO KS
Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat,-12:5:30
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