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January 25, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-25

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,I

I1

CINEM A II
is now accepting petitions for new board
members. Sign up, for an interview and
pick up your petition at the bulletin board,
first floor SAB. Interviews will be held on
January 26-27.

Racial tension interrupts Jackson's tranquility

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' COMMANDER CODY
and the LOST PLANET AIRMEN'S
TRI UMP HANT FAREWELL
DOOR LAST
OPEN .-.NIGHT
8 .:: E: TONIGHT
$2.0
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COLLAPSE
SOMETiMtE FREE
THEREAFTER ,.s 4.,,:>-i ; I OZONE
a p p p .. p a a n

By JAM4ES KUGAL
Dispatch News Service
JACKSON, Mich. - Jackson, population
50,000, is a medium-sized midwestern city with
all the trappings of middle-America: pretty,
tree-lined streets, a prosperous afternoon news-
paper, high employment, a good assortment of
bars, a black population of about 6,000, and a
few John Birch Society chapters.
But Jackson, like middle-seized towns all over
America, is beginning to get its share of big-city
problems.
In the past three months there have been five
murders, 11 other reports of snipings or shoot-
ings, a rape, and several beatings and knife
fights. Many of these have been linked to Jack-
son's racial problems, which townspeople describe
as tense.
It began on Dec. 4, when Charles Cade, 45,
Negro publisher of two weekly newspapers for
Jaclkson's black community, was found bludgeon-
ed to death in his apartment. The words "Black

..

Niger,,"misspelled, were written on the walls of
Cade's luxury apartment in his own blood. His
body had been dragged through the apartment,
spilling blood on carpets and furniture, and his
face was beaten so severely that identification
was difficult.
On the next day, Donald J. DeMarco, the
city's recently fired community relations director
and an outspoken advocate of black equality in
Jackson, received an anonymous note reading:
"You think like a niger, die like a niger. First
your wife, then your kids, then you." DeMarco
is not terribly popular in town. He has attacked
the John Birch Society publically, and his harsh
comments about rightwingers on a radio show
were received with disapproval.
But, on Dec. 6, an armed assailant entered
DeMarco's home while he was out, tied DeMarco's
wife to her bed with pieces of green sheet, raped
and then severely beat her. Mrs. Gini DeMarco
reported that her assailant told her: "DeMarco

killed Cade to start a race riot. He did. He did it
to start a race riot." The rapist was white, she
said.
On Dec. 7, after a reported armed robbery
attempt, police broke into the headquarters of
the Black Berets, a local Negro youth group. The
Berets sell Black Panther literature, but were
refcsed membership in that militant organization.
How does racial tension reach this pitch
in a city of 50,000?
Many whites in the town, clearly frightened
and angry, blame the recent outbreak of mur-
ders and sniping on the blacks, and agree with
County Prosecutor Bruce Barton that some young
blacks are "out to discredit everything-liter-
ally!"
Like many other American cities the major
complaint of blacks is lack "of jobs or blacks in
local government. Jackson blacks believe that the
city has harrassed and discriminated against
them.

"Only about 2 per cent of the people o.. the
city payroll are black," Harry W. Wright, Jack-
son representative of the U.S. Civil Rights Com-
mission observed, "and most of them are em-
ployed at low-level jobs."
The NAACP has called for the addition of
six to 12 blacks to the police forcehstarting with
the re-hiring of Jody Williamson, formerly the
city's only black policeman, who was fired last
August. At a later hearing, Williamson claimed
he was fired for offenses regularly committed
by white officers with impunity. He said the
police hierarchy was "out to get" him and had
other officers tail him on duty. The firing was
upheld.
"Our town is no different than other com-
munities across the country," Prosecutor Barton
said. "Unfortunately, the spotlight is on us. Sure
we have racial problems-what city doesn't?"
1ss9

0 1969

pag4e three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764.0554

Sunday, January 25, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Saturday and Sunday
Dir. LUIS BUNUEL (1961)
From the creater of Belle de Jour, an uncom-
promising probing of repressed sexuality.
Bunuel was exiled from Spain for his au-
dacity.
Shori: EXCERPTS FROM DRACiLA
Bela Lugosi
7 &9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75 AUDITORIUM

A FEDERAL GRAND JURY will convene in Cleveland Tues-
day to probe the murder of United Mine Workers leader Joseph
Yablonski, his wife and daughter.
More than 20 persons from "all walks of life" have been sub-
poened according to U.S. Attorney Robert B. Krupansky.
The investigation would involve "states other than Ohio" Kru-
pansky said but he refused to elaborate.
FBI warrants said plans to kill Yablonski were being made as
early as July 19. The three men charged with the slayings are Claude
E. Vealey, 26, Aubran W. Martin, 21, and Paul E. Gilly, 36. The FBI
has not announced any connection between the accused men and
the United Mine Workers.
* * *
FORMER GOVERNOR GEORGE ROMNEY, in a press con-
ference tomorrow, will decline to enter the U.S. Senate race in
Michigan.
Romney's action will leave the way clear for his wife Lenore to
seek the nomination.
This information is being passed to state Republican leaders who
have begun to prepare for a State Central Committee meeting in
St. Clair on Jan. 34-31.
The Michigan Republicans have also started an opinion sampling
to determine Mrs. Romney's strength as a candidate.
On Friday Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas E.
Brennan withdrew from the race. State Senator Robert Huber of
Troy is the only announced candidate.
* * *
CONGRESSIONAL SPONSORS of a bill to boost monthly
payments to veterans attending college are seeking to break
a Senate-House deadlock on the size of the increase.
The House passed the measure last August, allowing for a $35
increase for each veteran from $130 to $165. In October, the Senate
raised this figure to $190 and returned the bill to the House. Last
month the House increased its original proposal by $5.
" Nixon said the administration would support an increase only
to $147, as he felt the legislation was inflationary.
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif), said that Nixon's recommendation
for $147 payment was asking 'for double sacrifices from men who
fought abroad. Now, back home they are asked to help stem the in-
flation which stems directly from the war itself.",

-Associated Press
Muskie presents pollution program
Sen. Edmund S. Muskie (D-Maine), chairman of the Senate subcommittee on air and water pollu-
tion, presented his program for reducing pollution yesterday. Muskie recommended expenditures of
$15.5 billion through 1976 with a matching amount from state and local governments.
CLASHES IN LONDONDERRY-:*
VolenCe fares in N. Ireland
a ligisfeds r
e !/ o R BMa V TB Ge e r

considers
drug bill
WASHINGTON (A') - In the
year's first Saturday session, the
Senate today took up a massive
drug control bill intended to pro-
ride dhe Justice Department
with new tools to crack down on
the illicit narcotic traffic.
"Under this new law we will
impose severe punishment for the
professional criminal in the drug
trade while providing more flex-
ible penalties for the less serious
drug offenders," said Sen. Thomas
J. Dodd, D-Conn., the bill's floor
manager. Dodd urged quick pas-
sage of the administration-basked
bill which is, he said, "strictly and
primarily a law enforcement mea-
sure."
The bill provides for "no knock"
narcotics raids by law enforce-
ment officials, sets up categories
of drugs and dangerous substances,
creates a commission to study the
long-term effects ofmarijuana and
overhauls criminal penalties for
those convicted of drug abuse of-
fenses.
"The new penalties will allow
the judge to use his discretion in
imposing sentences for d r u g
offenders," Dodd said. "It will al-
low more severe sentences in the
case of pushers and traffickers in
heroin and a lesser sentence of up
to one year for offenders involv-
ed with the simple possession of
marijuana."
Sen. Harold Hughes, D-Iowa,
has promised that the Labor and
Pubic Welfare subcommittee he
heads will report legislation out by
mid-April legislation dealing with
the medical and scientific prob-
lems of drug abuse.
"This section permits narcotics
agents tohact like burglars and
enter a house by stealth or by
force," said Sen. Sam J. Ervin
(D-NC).
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day thrcugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session pubished Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mall.

TUESDAY MOADON (Meeting House)
THE SON G OF. ISRAEL
The spirit of the nation sings
in its music... come listen !
ASHER BEN-YOHANAN, Israeli
Musician and Composer
JOSEPH D. BEN-DAK, Research
Sociologist, Center for Research on
Conf ict Resolution
January 27-8 P.M.
at THE HOUSE_
1429 HLLL ST.
-ALL WELCOME-

GEN. C. ODUMEGWU OJUKWU, former ruler of Biafra, has
taken exile in the interior of the Ivory Coast.
After the Ivory Coast recognized Biafra, a large colony of Bia-
frans developed there. Many refugees have followed.
Ojukwu was 'believed to have passed through the Ivory Coast
around Jan. 12 and then moved elsewhere before returning recently.
Informants said there is good indication Ojukwu's children h a v e
been in the Ivory Coast for some time.
IIITIIHCOUK EXPOSES THE MOST
EXPLOSIVE SPY SCANDAL OF THIS CETURY! .
'-
ydF:::; a i

LONDONDERRY, Northern Ire-
land (P)-British troops in full ript
regalia erected barbed wire bar-
riers in the main streets Saturday
night after a series of violent
clashes between Roman Catholics
and Protestants.
It was the first significant trou-
ble in Londonderry since the feroc-
ious wave of religious feuding
which tore Northern Ireland apart
last August. It was the first time
army cordons had appeared since
the last of the barbed wire was
taken away two months ago.
Four hundred British troops
carrying automatic weapons,
GUILD
802 Mi

night-sticks and riot shields -
coordinated by a helicopter hover-
ing overhead - tangled w it h
mobs throwing stones and bottles.
An army spokesman said several
arrests were made.
At one point, 300 Catholics
marched out of their Bogslide
district through the town center
and stoned soldiers and a police
station, smashing a window.
Just as army squads prepared
to move into the throng and seize
ringleaders, a priest persuaded
the demonstrators to return to
their homes.

It was the third disturbance of
the day.-
An army spokesman said tensionl
first flared in the Diamond dis-
trict when 300 members of the
pro-Catholic People's Democracy
group staged a demonstration to
protest a Northern Ireland gov-t
ernment ban of a newspaper call-
ed the United Irishman, an or-
gan for advocates of union with-
the Irish Republic to the south. E
Protestants marshaled for -a
counter-demonstration and stones
and bottles began to fly.r
As the soldiers moved in, a sec-
tion of the crowd advanced toc
meet them, chanting, "Go home,
you bums!" and "troops-SS."t
Adolf Hitler's Elite Guard was
known as the SS.

11

HOUSE
ONROE

5th Week
Sows at
1, 3, 5,7, 9

'7-

DIAL
5-629©

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PREM IERE TON IGHT!
, r :::.srr:.i ." :.**: ,
OF MICHIGAN.
PROFESSIONAL: :
THEATRE
PR.O GRAM IS1111.

A UVNER$AL PICTURE TECHNCOLOR

MONDAY, JANUARY 26
NOON LUNCHEON-25c
MARY YOURD, Michigan Women for
Medical Control of Abortion:
"Repeal Michigan Abortion Law"
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27
NOON LUNCHEON
ORIGAMI: FUN OF THE FOLD

William Faulkner's Pulitzer Prize-Winning
Novel "The Reivers" is now a film!
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-
ter. A marvelous time is had by
cll."-New York Magazine .

Steve McQueen
'The Reivers
with
SHARON FARRELL
and WILL GEER

Information
Dial
NO 2-6264

SHOWS AT
1:00, 3:05, 5:10
7:15 & 9:30 P.M.

J

T: V°YtV A MA

w

I'N

JANUARY 26 -31
U.. Professleal Premiere!

JOSE TRIANA'S

I

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1966 Royal shakespeare Company
a . Success in London!i

I;

Prize-Winning Play of the
American University Theatre
Festival!
"Fascinating-bold--innovative!"
-Boston Herald
"Unique-marvelous sense of

WHAT IS THE
--an all-campus orchestra!
-sponsored by MUSKET and G&S!
-performing "George M!" and
"Pirates of Penzance!

"HOW HARD IT IS TO ACCEPT
THE TRUTH"

TO OPEN YOUR MIND?

ARE YOU READY

SENATOR ABRAHAM RIBICOFF

S ian Un for Auditins on

S 33 .1

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