100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, .lanuary 2b, 1970

Tuesday. January 20. 1970 , --, -

{

ENACT lobbies for
Sleeping Bear plan

DAILY OFFICIA L BULLETIN

C l' auditing, good exper. for new grad~
Piacemtent srvice
.F CCE? ZE''t2 er tce could start part time, go to full time
GENERAL DIVISION upon graduation, prefer business cours-
es, with acctg. exper, of some cort.
_____City of Mt. Pleasant, Mich.: Rssist- I

ENACT, the University groupG
Tanning a March 11-14 teach-in to
)cus public attention on the en-
ronmental pollution crisis, sees
lichigans proposed Sleeping Bear
unes National Lakeshore as an
nportant issue.-
For over a decade it has been
roposed to designate the Sleep-
ig Bear Dunes area as a new
ational lakeshore, protecting 61,-
00 acres.
The Ann Arbor group of faculty,
udents, and associates has en-
orsed the current proposals out-
ned in both Senate and House

.delegation who do not yet support
the lakeshore legislation to do so
immediately "in the interests of
all the people of Michigan."
Along with appeals to the State
Legislature, Gav. William G. iMl-
likin and rPesident Richard Nix-
on for support, ENACT says it will
seek support from young p e o p 1e
across the state, stating:
"The meek do not inherit t h e
earth, the young do. We are un-
willing to inherit a Michigan
whose most unique and inviting
natural heritage has been plunder-{
ed for short-term private gain,o
subdivision, and development.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN fo0r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g ., before
2 p.m., ofthe day preceding pub-t
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday forj
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. Fo r more informa-
tion, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20
Day Calendar
Michigan Pastor's Conference: Mich-
igan Union Ballroom, 9:00 a.m.
Physics & Astronomy Theoretical
Seminar: David Richards, "Magnetic
Monopole": P & A Colloquium Room,
4:15 p.m.
Stanley Quartet Commemorative Con-
cert: Louise Cuyler, lecturer, illustrated
by the Stanley Quartet: Rackham Am-
phitheater, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild: Charles Chaplin Fea-
tures: Architecture Auditorium, 7:00
and 9:05 p.m.
Bach-Mozart Sonatas for Violin and
iPano: Performers from the classes of
Eugene Bossart and Angel Reyes:
School of Music Recit i Hall, 8:00 p.m.
New Mobilization Committee Discus-
sion: Professor Ernest Young, History
Department, Professor Allen Whiting(
Political Science, and others, "United
States Involvement in Vietnam: How
Did t Happen?" Multipurpose Room,
Undgrgraduate Library, 8:00 p~m.
kolais -irri
Dance Lecture-Demonstration: N i -
kolais Dance oCmpany : Hill Auditor-
ium, 8:30 p.m.

Interview at the Journalism Depart-'
.....................r. . ..:r.:".:;.::«.:.:::.:":::;:.;:.:.:::.:"i:?:#:: 1:;:?:::5: m ent on W ednesday, Jan. 21, c a 11
764-0420 to make appointment:
tion blanks available in Room 3014, Milwaukee Journal, managing edt-'
Rackham Building for the Law School tor visiting campus for graduates in
Admission Test. The next administra- all liberal arts areas for editorial posi-'
tion of the test will be on Saturday, tions with the Journal. Also have Sum-
February 14, and applications are due mer Intern positions. Speak with him -
in Princeton, New Jersey before Jan- at the Journ. Dept. 2040 LS&A Bldg
uary 23. on Wednesday, Jan. 21.
Applications for the U-M Junior year These Are Some of the current open-
in Germany and France must be re- ings we receive, come in and browse;
turned by eFb. 1 to Study Abroad through openings throughout the U.S.
Office, 1223 Angell Hall. Spring graduates may be interested in
.:.::;:;:,:.;;:,. Ines for little or no exper.
State of Michigan, openings for trav-
G eling about the state as required -
R Unemployment claims clerk, BIA, new
grad, apply before Feb. 9. Economic
Opportunity Executive, BA any area
and 4-6 years in health, education, wel-
fare, at least one year specifically in
..::';; °': : 9 '!%?:s<>::;;:? :;;:s programs related to econ. oppor. act, i
masters in areas of edue., welfare, or I
Undergraduate Political Science As- publ. admin., may be subs. for some
sociation General election of officers, of the req. exper.
'Jan. 20th, 7:30 p.m. in 1025 A.H. FoI- Local, Area Office, contact Placement
lowed by discussion of results of re- Services: Office Manager, purchasing,
cent survey concerning Undergraduate office space planning, hiring, internal
education.

ant in administrative duties to the
City Manager College, spec. in pub-
lic admin., or soc. sci. areas, will serve
in admin. planning, research and co-
ordination fuctios. Apply before Feb.
5. New graduates welcome.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAil, Lower Level
Department of Community Affairs,
State of New Jersey, offers Summer
Intern Community Service Program,'
assignments in mayor's office, anti-
poverty agencies, model city p r o-
grams. etc.
Trainees Exchange Office, Helsinki,
Finlind, has openings for two students
in Traffic Planning. Seniors or grad-
uate students, apply before Jan. 31.
Lord Corporation, Erie, Pa., openings
for Soph, Jrs, and Srs to assist in Re-
search Dev. work,
Computer Software Systems, Stam-
ford, Conn., has openings for stu-
dents with BA or edv. degrees in pro-
gramming on the IBM 360, exper. or
coursework.
Standard Oil Company, Cleveland,
Ohio, openings for Cleveland area re-
sidents in Travel Bureau Department.

YPS ,I TI
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area,
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.
1 0 OFF
O N ALL BOO KS
Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri -9-6; Sat.-12:5:30
We think we're interestina-

"Obviously this is not one of Sleeping Bear should be a part
the great crucial environmental is- of the future of our state - as a
sues facing this society," ENACT great public reserve within the
officials said. "But failure to act National Park System."
to save 'The Bear' is symptomatic Sleeping Bear Dunes, located
of failure of society to serious at- along the northwest short of Mich-
tack th e deeper problems of en- igan's Lower Peninsula, constitutes
vironmental pollution. a landscape ouranefniuqt
"We believe this legislation is - a landscape of unique natural val-,
unfinished business for conserva- . ue and public recreation poten-
tion in Michigan -- and we be- tial, natural resources authorities
lieve it should be finished im- have said.
mediately. We pledge to work to The combination of dunes, for-'
bring this issue to a successful est, inland lakes, and the spec-
conclusion in 1970, cooperating tacular Lake Michigan shoreline
with the Sierra Club, Michigan create a total landscape consid-'
United Conservation Clubs, and all ered of ntional significance. Pro-
other groups sharing this pur- ponents of the national lakeshore'
pose."
ENACT Environmental Action say that for so superb a resource,
for Survival) is calling upon mem- the best possible protection in the
bers of the Michigan Congressional I public interest is mandatory.'

Bach Club meeting, Wednesday, Jan
21, 8:00 p.m.: Campus Chapel (1236
Washtenaw, at S. Forest, near S. Univ.).
Speaker: Dr. Thonas Taylor, "Toward
the Beethoven Ninth". Refreshments
and FUN afterwards. Everyone w e 1 -
come! (No musical knowledge needed.)
For transportation or further info, call
665-6806, 769-2003, 761-7356.
* * * *
Free University registration will take
place in the Fishbowl, Jan. 26-31st.
Department of Geology & Mineralogy
Journal Club - double header. Tuesday,
Jan. 20, Dr. James Sprinkle, "Evolu-
tionary Patterns in Early Echinoderms"
- 3:30, coffee in 3071 Nat, Sd.; 4:00,
lecture in 3082 Nat. Sci. Thursday, Jan-
uary 22: Dr. Jock G. Hills, U of M
Dept. of Astronomy, "Formation of
Planetary Systems" 3:30, coffee in 3071
Nat. Sciy; 4:00, lecture in 170 Physics
& Astronomy (Aud. E},.

ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE UNIONS
BOWLING TOURNAMENT
QUALIFY JAN. 22-23, 1970
Winners Will Go to Regionals
at Columbus February 20

We hope you will.

__ _.s

SIGN UP
NOW

MICHIGAN UNION
BOWLING LANES
OPEN 1 P.M.-MIDNIGHT

General Notices
Law School Admission Test: Applica-

Order Youi Daily Now-

_ _ _ _ _

Opportunities

for

Growth

01

Religious

Understanding

4

Many opportunities are provided within the Univer-
sity community for growth in knowledge of one's
ownfaith and in an understanding of the religious
life of others.
/ In addition to seminars arid lectures sponsored by the
Office of Religious Affairs, study programs are offer-
ed through the more than 33 religious centers and
are open to all interested persons. Some of the pro-
grarns for the Winter Term are announced on this
page. Participation in these studies can be o great
assistance in relating religion to contemporary issues
and in correlating religious thought with other dis-
ciplines.
Courses about religion are provided by several Uni-
versity departments. For a listing, consult the section
on "Studies in Religion" in the ctalog of the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
-The Office of Religious Affairs

Directory of Religious Counselors

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missourti Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
ALFRED T. SCHEIPS, Pastor
Survey Course in Christian Doctrine: Meets at 8:00
P.M. Tuesday evenings, beginning Jan. T3th. In-
structor: The Rev. Alfred Scheips. Course prepares
for communicant membership.
Study of Selected Psalms: Meets at 9:30 A.M. or
11:00 A.M. Sunday mornings during the winter
term. Student-led.
THE BAHA'I FArITH
INVITES ALL TO OPENHOUSE FIRESIDES:

CANTERBURY HOUSE
HOWDID THE SLOTHS GET FROM MT..ARAT TO
SOUTH AMERICA IF THEY WERE SO LETHARGIC?
This and most anything else will beconsidered Tuesday nights
ot 7:30 in Theology and Stuff, or A Rose in the Desert, or Sur-
vivaF in the Maelstrom, or How You Gonna Keep 'em Down in the
Moderate Aristotelian City After They've Seen the Child?, or
Alleluiq's Well That Ends Well. See you.
GOD IS LOVE
Seminars are open to all who desire to attend!
A true understanding of God is available to us every day, and
everyone has, here and now, the opportunity to know and to prove
in his or her life the presence of good and the power of God. At
each meeting of the Christian Science Organization, testimonies
can be heard which relate the teachings of Christ Jesus, and their
present application, to all problems and to every need. We find
that a knowledge of the truth of man brings to destruction every
kind of fear, reveals our real identity, and daily re-adjusts our
lives toward more excitement, joy, health, and harmoriy. You are
welcome to join with us in a growing awareness and practical
demonstration of the ever-present power of divine Love.
Consider these sevn synonyms for God explored in Christian
Science:

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD
The Rev. T. Burt Evans-1406 Russell
Mr. James S. Seregow-2455 Washtenaw
BAHA'I
Mr. Robert Hayden
BAPTIST (American)
The Rev. Ronald Tipton-502 E. Huron
BAPTIST (Southern)
The Rev. Thomas Bloxam-l131 Church
BAPTIST (General Conference)
The Rev, Charles R. Johnson-2642 Patricia Ct.1
CHRISTIAN REFORMED (Campus Chapel)
The Rev. Leonard Verduin-Washtenaw at Forest
Mr. Russell Palsrok
CHRISTIAN REFORMED (Student Guild)
The Rev. Sidney Draaver-1717 Broadway
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Mr. Chqrles E. Olsen, Jr.-153'7 Nat. Res. Bldg.
Mrs. Natalie Campbell-2220 Washtenaw
CONGREGATIONAL (See Guild House)
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST (See Guild House)
EASTERN ORTHODOX (See Greek Orthodox)

662-6211
665-6778
763-2269
663-9376
761-0441
761-6749
668-7421
665-0105
764-1413
665-5478

Monday-511 Mosher Hall
Friday-1474 Jewett St.

764-0922
665-4676

WANT TO TALK WITH SOMEONE

Adult Meeting and Discussion
Sundays-i 1 A.M.-1400 Granger
The Study of Baha'i Spiritual Teachings
For further information cal( 769-6877, 662-3548

MIND

TRUTH
LOVE

SPIRIT
PRINCIPLE

SOUL

LI FE

Want help in making a decision?
Want to talk over a personal difficulty?
Need information or assistance for a special problem?
Are you pregnant and need help?
Interested iji religion and its resources for living?
Want just to rap about matters important to you?
The staff of O.R.A. ore available to you. Counseling is informal.
Just walk in. If we cannot help you we will find out who can.
We have working relationships with psychological, psychiatric,
medical dnd social resources on campus and in the community.
And wp work closely with the many campus ministers who repre-
sent particular religious faiths.
HV Y
PORTNOY'S COMPLAINT '(Roth)
REVOLUTIONARY WRITINGS (Torres)

U FELLOWSHIP OF
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

3150 Glacier Way, AA

769-6299

I'

CAMPUS 1980 (Eurich)
WHAT IS RELIGION (Tillich)

SUNDAYS:
9:45 A.M. Relevant Bible Discussions, Contemporary Re-
ligious Book Studies, etL
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service w it h variety in content and
structure.
8:30 P.M. Informal Campus & Careers Fellowship with re-
freshments-in area members' homes.
Transportation available 9;30 A.M. Sundays at the
Ann Arbor "Y" or through 761-6749
HELP GET US TOGETHER;
AND WE'LL
HELP YOU GET TOGETHER
UNIVERSAL LIFE CHURCH
THE REVEREND JOHN NEMO
333 John Street
(call anytime) 769-1247

The CHRISTIAN SCIENE ORGANIZATION meets on every
Thursday evening at 7:30 in room 3545 of the SAB.
The Christian Science Church is located at 1833 Washtenaw.
There, Sunday morning services are held at 10:30, and Wednes-
day evening testimony meetings at 8:00.
The Christian Science Readinq Room at 306 East Libierty, i the
place to go for individual study and mare information. A copy of
the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy, and other literature, can be
found in the Religious Affairs Library on the 2nd floor of the SAB.
There will be a public lecture by Mr. Joseph Heard on Christian
Science, March 31. Time and place to be announced.
MCHIGAN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
MCF seeks to be a Christian Community within the everyday
situations on this campus, and in so doing, to critically examine
the person of Christ and the implications of his message to our
campus situation.
The programs we sponsor are lecture discussions, retreat, social
events, small group meetings in living situations for prayer and
study, and some forms of social outreach. We value the oppar-
tunity to interact with you as a student. -.
For more information call-Mark Karls, 665-5485
NEXT MEETING-FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
LINDA RICH-FOLKSINGER
Michigan Union Ballroom
$1.50
MCF is a branch of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship

JUDAISM (B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation)
Rabbi Gerald Goldman-1429 Hill

ISRAEL: AN ECHO OF ETERNITY (Heschel)
SENSE AND NONSENSE IN RELIGION (Stensor)
DRUGS ON THE COLLEGE CAMPUS (Nowlis)
LET'S WORK TOGETHER (Wright, Jr.)
These and many other books and periodicals are available from
the LIBRARY maintained by the Office of Religious Affairs on the
Second floor of the Student Activities Building.
Excellent selections in literature, biography, psychology, phi-
losophy, and sociology will be found alongside works on ethics,
theology, and particular religious traditions.
The-library is for all students,,facultv, and staff and is open for
use and study from 8:30 A.M. to 12 Noon and 1:00 to 5:00
P.M., Monday through Friday.
Assistance in finding particular reading resources is available
from the staff of the Office of Religious Affairs.
DROP BY AND BROWSE!

663-4129

ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER (Ecumenical Association
for International Understanding)
The Rev. Paul Dotson-921 Church 662-5529
Mr. David Sobrepena
Mr. William Lutz
EPISCOPAL CHAPLAINCY TO THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY
The Rev. Donald Allen-306 N. Division 663-7809
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION (Canterbury House)
The Rev. A. Craig Hammond-330 Maynard 665-0606
Mr. Mark Harris
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN (See Guild House)
FREE METHODIST
The Rev. James D. Kirk-1951 Newport Rd. 668-8351
FRIENDS (Young Friends)
Mrs. Margaret Winder-1416-1420 Hill St. 668-9341 or
663-1780
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
The Rev. Raymond H. Saxe-1 10 N. State St. 663-0589
GREEK ORTHODOX
The Rev. John Kamelakis-414 N: Main 769-2945
GUILD HOUSE (United Campus Christian Fellowship)
The Rev. J. Edgar Edwards-802 Monroe 662-5189
Mrs. Hildegard Cummings
INTER-VARSITY (Michigan Christian'Fellowship)
Keith Hunt-612 S. Forest, Off, G. 769-2021
ISLAM ( See. Muslim Students Association)}

LATTER DAY SAINTS (Moran, Church of Jesus Christ of L.D.S.)
Bishop John P. Rahlf-2141 Brockman Blvd. 668-8715
LATTER DAY SAINTS (Reorganized Church of
Jesus Christ of L.D.S.)
The Rev. Warner G. Breiner-S14 Leona Dr. 665-4095
LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod)
The Rev, Alfred T. Scheips-1511 Washtenaw 663-5560
The Rev. Arthur J. Spomer
LUTHERAN (National Lutheran Council)
The Rev. Donald G. Zill-801 S. Forest 668-7622
LUTHERAN (Wisconsin Synod)
The Rev. Werner H. Franzmann-3523 Terhune 971-1317
MENNONITE
The Rev. Daniel Slabaugh-8265'M-36, Whitmore Lake
449-4183
METHODIST
The Rev. Bartlett Beavin-602 E. Huron 668-6881
The Rev, Edward McCracken
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Mr. Omar F. Afandi, Acting President 761-5480 or
Mr. Ulvi Adallioglu, Vice-President 761 -3068
NAZARENE
The Rev. George 0. Ferguson-409 S. Division
761-5941, 761-2321

4

NEWMVANCLAS PROG RAM
WINTER 1970
FUNDAMENTALS OF CATHOLIC CHRISTIANITY (tarting January 12). Designed as a basic survey course
in Catholicism's traditions and practice for perspective converts and/or those contemplating marriage to a
Catholic. Those who are curious to know what the Catholic Church teaches today in basic areas are particu-
arly welcome.
Frs. Charles Irwin and Joseph Kuntz. Mon. and Thurs. at 4 P.M. or 7 P.M.

PERSONAL EXPLORATIONS
(An informal seminar in "experimental" or "situation" theology)
All interested students are invited to share, clarify, and explore
with others those values, ideas, and feelings most relevant to
their lives. Participants in the seminar will examine many of the
basic value-judgments and assumptions upon which their lives
are based and talk about the subiects-taboo or otherwise-
which they feel are important. Plans for future meetings will be
made at the first session.

OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Robert H. Hauert-2282 Student Activities Bldg.'
Lloyd W. Putnam
;Leonard J. Scott
PRESBYTERIAN
The Rev. Paul Dotson-92 1 Church
Miss Shirley Lewis.
REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA (University
Reformed Church) -
The Rev. Calvin Malefyt-1041 E, Huron
The Rev. Paul Swets

° 764-7442
662-3580
662-3153

The following courses begin the week of January 19 and carry a registration fee of $2.00

FAITH AND THE GOSPELS IN THE LIGHT
OF MODERN BIBLICAL STUDIES (101)
Fr. William Hutchinson, S.J.
Monday, 8 P.M. for 8 weeks
LIVING THE MESSAGE OF CHRIST (201)

THEOLOGY OF HOPE (302)
Sr. Constance
Tuesday, 7 P.M. for 1Q weeks
THEOLOGY AND LITERATURE (303)
Sr. Constance
Moc ~v7 P MA IYr 1 fl weeks/

ROMAN CATHOLIC (St. Mary's Chapel, Richard Center)
The Rev. Charles E. Irvin-331 Thompson 663-0557
Sister Constance Smedinghoff
The Rev. Joseph M. Kuntz
M vr. George J. Coakley-{(Counseling for Int'l Students)

I

U

U

f. ..,.,., .. _ .. ... ..... ......

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan