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January 20, 1970 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN aAILI '

uesday, January ZO, 197

Pae,. t H IHIA AL

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leers
By BILL ALTERMAN n

in

weekend

split

tie de~ jA

Michel Jarry that resulted in a
n l~at chnt n tn h

Special students subscription rate:-$5. for 35 issues (Reg. $1.)
THE HOCKEY NEWS, P.O. BOX 248, MONTREAL 101, CANADA
Gentlemen, enclosed is my cheque or money order
Please enter my subscription to 'The Hockey News". 24
Name
Address

"One night we put them in and penlt Usag for 1I. 111w uc-
the next night they did." cessful penalty shot was prescrib-
ed because Jarry's trip from be-
Although Michigan coach Al hind was made as Huskie Al Mc-
Renfrew was admittedly simplify- leod was about to shoot. Coach
ing things in this capsule sum- Renfrew along with everyone else
mary of the weekend's hockey ac- in the sold-out Coliseum objected
tion, he was not too far off the that the trip came after the shot
mark. Despite managing only an- but to no avail. As McLeod pro-
other two-game split in the home ceeded to slip th e puck around
twinbill, against Michigan Tech, goalie Karl Bagnell.
they played probably the best ser-
ies of the lengthening season. Bagnell was superb the rest of
Still, with the WCHA halfway the night, however, and 46 times
through its schedule, Michigan turned back Tech shots.
will have to get superhot fast if Rick Mallette also had a me-
they want to finish on top of reg- morable game as he scored the
ular season play. Their upcoming first goal of his career in the 6-2
series against front-running Min- victory.
nesota should tell. But back to T h e following night, Renfrew
this past weekend, thought, "The team played better
Friday night's game was a no- and we had the opportunities but
holds-barred affair. Eighteen pen- we didn't score."
alties were called including a trip- On several occasions Michigan
ping charge against Wolverine O------ig

Bill Cusumono

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STUDENTS!
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Michigras, 17
(April, 1970)
PETITION NOW FOR CENTRAL COMMITTEE
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nad an open chance in the 6-3 loss
but couldn't capitalize on it. Cap-
tain Dave Perrin was unable to
convert on several breakaways and
Merle Falk had a straight shot but
missed.
One problem t h e Wolverines
had both nights was clearing out
the puck from in front of the nets.
"We got away with it Friday,"
Renfrew a d m i t t e d, "but we
weren't so lucky Saturday. Jarry,
for example, lost the puck around
the crease Saturday and Tech was
quick to convert it."

" 8 BARBERS, no waitinq
" OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maple Village

KARL BAGNELL (1) kicks out one of the 46 shots Michigan
Tech pummeled at the sophomore goalie in the 6-2 Wolverine
victory at the Coliseum last Friday night. In for the rebound is
Tech's Lyle Moffat (21), while Michigan defenseman Brian
Skinner (2) attempts to check an unidentified Huskie.

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Large ane item { r more)}
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Renfrew did not blame Bagnell
for any of Saturday's voes. "He ice and the Wolverines journey up
played a good game, but Tech had there this weekend for a series.
better chances than the night be- In addition the Wolverines are
fore." not in the best of health. A flu
Nevertheless, Michigan, with a epidemic has struck the team and
7-5 conference record (10-7 over- Brian Skinner, Jarry, Don Deeks,
all) will have a long way to go to Paul Gamsby and Barney Pashak,
catch Minnesota. T h e Gophers, among others, w e r e all absent'
9-3, have yet to lose on their own from practice yesterday. All should'
r

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make Thursday's trip however.
Doug Heyliger who is o u t with
torn ligaments in his knee is still
on crutches but may be out of his
cast some time next week.
Tech (4-2-1 in conference, 8-5-
1 overall) does not play Michigan
again in regulation play. Last year
the Huskies swept all four of the
games between the two teams.
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u ..

High-flyiig Hawk
finally comes home
If you don't have anything to do tonight, tune in channel
7 on the old tube and watch the NBA All-Star game. You'll see
the greatest basketball player in the world do his stuff.
Notice that I said player, not players. It's no mistake. Even
though the finest the pros have to offer will be on display in
Philadelphia, present for the first time ever will be THE
best, Connie Hawkins.
I imagine that statement is met by many with laughter,
by others with incredulity and by even others with the question:
Just who is Connie Hawkins, anyway? And none of these
reactions is unexpected. After all, this is Hawkins' first year
in the NBA, and hardly anyone has actually seen him play
since he is mired with the Phoenix Suns.
BUT DESPITE his inexperience in the NBA Hawkins is still
the best. He has gained more than enough experience else-
where. He is recognized as Number One by the toughest judges of
them all, the people who play on the blacktop, the playground
players. The Hawk is the king of Brooklyn and New York
schoolyards where only the toughest survive. In a very real
sense he is a living legend.
Charlie Davis, former Brooklyn Tech star and now an
all-ACC guard, uses tones of awe when the conversation turns
to Hawkins. "Man," says Charles, "when he is around there
is only one, and that one is the Hawk."
The Hawk, that's what they call him and it's an appropri-
ate name for the 6-8 man who literally flies through the air,
and he does it with the greatest of ease. Hawkins is the only
man his size that you'll ever see bring the ball up court, dribble
between his legs and finish it off with one of his many behind
the back or behind the head passes. His favorite trick is to just
swoop down on the basket after taking off from the foul line
and then dunk with his arm fully extended. The wonder of it
all is that he does it with consummate ease.
But things haven't always gone so well for the Hawk and
that's why most people have never heard of him. As a matter
of fact, until this season only super fans knew of him as a
player. Everyone else remembered Connie Hawkins as the guy
at Iowa who got implicated in the betting scandals of 1961.
HAWKINS HAD COME out of the slums of Bedford-Stuy-
vesant and made his way to Iowa. He was going to be the
Messiah of basketball in corn country. Iowa publicity agents
had dreams of slogans calling him Connie Hawkeye and every-
thing else. But the bubble burst before Connie ever made it on
the court as a varsity performer.
The New York District Attorney's office uncovered a betting
ring in March of 1961. Gamblers had been bribing college
players to "shave" points and were cleaning up by controlling the
point spread. The ring leader of the operation turned out to
be a lawyer named Jack Molinas. Unfortunately for Connie
Hawkins, Molinas had befriended him many times over the
years.
Consequently, Hawkins was hauled into a hotel room in
New York and grilled for three days by agents of the DA. In
those days the Supreme Court 'had yet to define a suspect's
rights, and as a result Hawkins ended up admitting everything
that the DA wanted to hear. He was a scared, naive 19-year-old
kid and didn't have a chance. He had never taken any bribe
money had not even played in a varsity game. Yet he was
branded along with the legitimate criminals and blacklisted
by the NBA.
HAVING LOST his scholarship at Iowa and having no place
to play professionally, the future looked dismal. He got a brief
respite, though, when the American Basketball League came
into being. The ABL desperately needed players to compete with
the NBA and took Hawkins in.
He was 19 at the time but immediately began to establish
the reputation he was to acquire of being the best. Despite
playing with seasoned professional and college players, Hawk-
ins only led the league in scoring and was the most valuable
player.;
His coach at the time was Neil Johnston and if you care to
ask Johnston he'll tell you that Connie was the best he's ever
had. Considering that Johnston had Wilt Chamberlain for two
years that is high praise.
BUT THE ABL FOLDED and the Hawk was once again left
without a nest. This time he went to the Harlem Globetrotters.
Hiss ballhandling and leaping abilities fit in perfectly with the
clown team and while with them he refined such talents to a
consummate degree.
Hawkins was thrilling millions and gaining the respect of
his fellow professionals but something was missing. There were
those who laughed at the legend of the Hawk because he hadn't
played in the NBA. People derided Hawkins as a clown, a man
who couldn't cut it in real competition. Apparently everyone had
forgotten the precedent the Hawk had set in that one year in
the ABL.
HAWKINS REMEMBERED, though, and he strove for one
thing, a place in the NBA. He filed an anti-trust suit and finally
got a fantastic settlement out of court. He got a $250,000 con-
tract from the Suns plus a pension of $25,000 a year from
the time he is 45 until he dies. But that was just chicken feed,

The most important thing for Hawkins was that he got an
NBA contract.
So what has he done now that he got his chance? Well, he
is starting in the All-Star and that should be enough answer
for anyone. Watch him fly, tonight and you'll know why he's
starting. Remember, he is THE best. What makes it even more
unbelievable is that Hawkins is not as good as he was three
years ago. Knee injuries have slowed him down a lot. But I
really shouldn't have told you that. You won't even be able
to imagine that anyone could ever have been better than Hawk-
ins is now.

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ELEANOR RIGBY
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