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December 07, 1967 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER. 7,196:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IpAnv wMir

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1 9 6 7 THE MICflhI~AN flAII.V Aea~zC. WAVEa

I'AliC; r1VE

i

REQUESTS IN ALL AREAS:
Fleming Sees Vast 'U' Building Needs

.....
r---

UA((,

(Continued from Page 1)
and professional programs. Since
' almost half of all professional
and doctoral degrees granted in
the state come from the Univer-
sity, and since the cost of edu-
cating a graduate is greater than
that of an undergraduate, the
University cannot compete with
other state schools on a unit-of-
enrollment basis.
Fleming explains the legisla-
ture is aware of the cost factor,
but adds there is increasing pres-
sure for a leveling off of ap-
propriations between the Big
Three state universities.
Fleming says however, federal
;funds will not be immediately
forthcoming to fill the vacuum,
particularly while the United
States is involved in Vletpam.
"Until we get these federal funds,
we are going to have difficulty
with the state and our appropria-
tion level will be low."
The University also faces major
worries in the area of construction
of new buildings, but Fleming
points out that the question of
the University's autonomy in re-
lation to the Legislature is hinder-
ing any expansion in this area at
the present time.
Until the courts decide on the
question of the constitutionality
of Public Act 124 (1965)-(which
vests control of University con-

struction in the state) and Public
Act 240 (1967) - (which limits
out-of-state enrollment to 25 per
cent). The University will not be
able to secure the monies neces-
sary to begin needed construction.
The last capital outlay appropria-
tion for a new building was in
1966 for the dental school com-
plex.
Since that time, only continu-
ing appropriations for the dental,
medical science buildings and re-
novations of the University Hos-
pital have been granted.

Commenting on this situation,
Fleming notes that "all units of
the University have legitimate re-
quests for new or expanded facil-
ities. The University will not have
enough money to meet all of
these needs, even under the best
conditions. Therefore a priority
list must be established."
Fleming feels that the planned
expansion of the facilities for the
literary college must be at the
top of any list, but adds that the
arcitecture and design college and
the engineering school are both

desparately in need of new build-
ings. Expanded library and recrea-
tional facilities are also definite
needs.
The Residential College is
another area which Fleming feels
requires additional funds. He
points out that "the decision to
remain in the East Quadrangle
area does not mean that the
college is not going to be devel-
oped. It may have to do with less+
than was originally planned, but
the program will not be abandon-
ed.",

"Last Trip To Bursley"
with
YELLOW
SAT., DEC. 9, 1967
9-12 A.M.
Bursley Dining Room

I

11

I

HOWE NOW!
"The most glorious vision of the intellectual life
is still that which is loosely called humanist: the
ideal of a mind committed yet dispassionate, ready
to stand alone, curious, eager skeptical. THE BAN-
NER OF INDEPENDENCE, RAGGED AND TORN
THOUGH IT MAY BE, IS STILL THE BEST WE
HAVE."
from Steady Work by
IRVING HOWE
Writer-in-Residence

Lawyers in Cinema Guild Case Study
Social Values of Flaming Creatures'

(Continued from Page 1)
Attorney William Delhey, con-
tends that the case tests the
power of a police officer to stop
a crime being committed in his
presence.
He says the requirement of
having a prior judgment on films
before they are seized would en-
able organizations such as Cin-
ema Guild, which normally shows
films only one or two days, to
become "one-night stands for
smoker movies."

Administration's Troubles
Growing at U of California

By DAVID BERSON
Collegiate Press Service
BERKELEY, Calif. (CPS) -
0 Opposition to the University of
California campus administration
here has taken on large proport-
ions in the last two weeks.
Students brought activities at
the Sproul Hall adminis-
tration building to a halt for
three consecutive days. The dem-
onstrations were non-violent with
students using mostly nuisance
tactics while campus police photo-
graphed participants and deans
in the building threatened stu-
dents with suspensions.
Although activity is expected to
simmer down with the beginning
of final examinations, leaders of
the movement will be mapping
out plans for further confronta-
tions after the holidays.
The protests center around three
major issues:
0 The suspension last week of
, two campus radicals for their
participation in anti-war rallies
held on the campus in mid-Octo-
ber.
0 The structural shake-up or-
dered by Chancellor Roger W.
Heyns which has shifted a great
deal of financial power from the
Student Senate to the Admin-
istration.
0 The Administration's hand-
ling of demonstrations against the
CIA and Dow Chemical Company.
Recommended for Suspension
The two suspended students are
Reese Erlich and Peter Camejo,
both undergraduates and leaders
of the movement which produced
several large demonstrations at
the Oakland Army Induction Cen-
ter. The two were singled out by
the Chancellor from eleven stu-
dens recommended for suspension
W by the Dean of Students.
Heyns' restructuring of the
control over student funds leaves
the student government very little
power to regulate their own f in-
ances.. The move was the chan-
cellor's reaction to the Student
Senate's decision to permit grad-
uate students' voting in campus
elections.

Radical students have a good
chance of capturing the Senate
seats. The results of the election
will be known on Wednesday of
this week.
The handling of the anti-re-
cruiting demonstrations is anoth-
er source of student unrest. Dur-
ing these protests, the Administra-
tion imposed a complicated set of
rules on the demonstrators, which
many felt were unjustified and
set arbitrarily by the Adminis-
tration.
Lost Respect
What appears to be increasingly
clear here is that the Heynes Ad-
ministration, which came to the
campus during the chaotic after-
math of the Free Speech Move-
ment in 1965, has completely lost
the respect of a large segment of
Berkeley students.
Students say that last week's
demonstrations proved to the ad-
ministration that students can
bring the school's business to a
halt whenever they care to.

The case in District Court will
not be decided until the Circuit
Court case is over. Goodman and
Delhey are presently preparing
briefs for submission. Goodman
says a decision in Cinema
Guild's favor will not necessarily
insure the success of an appeal
of the charges against Cinema
Guild.
What has the impact of all
this notoriety had on Cinema
Guild and the four defendants?
The organization has incurred a
$3,800 debt from court costs and
legal fees. At present it has a
little over $2,000 in its legal de-
fense fund.
In addition, Cinema Guild has
refrained from showing any ex-
perimental films this semester,
because f u r t h e r controversy
would be detrimental to their
case. "No one had to say it," Ellen
Frank, '68, says. "It was under-
stood."
Cinema Guild will show their
regular Wednesday night experi-
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 10l1 SAB.
* * *
Michigan yChristian F ei o ws h ip,
Christmas party, Dec. 8, meet at Engin
Arch at 7:'30 p.m. for rides.
* * *
Art Print Loan: All prints loaned out
must be returned December 8, 7-9 p.m.,
512sAB.
* * *
La Socledad Hispanica, Una fiestahis-
panica denavidad, Fri, Dec. 8, 8:30 p.m.,
3050 Frieze Building. Everyone, includ-
ing children, are cordially invited.

mental film series next semester,
she adds.
The defendants themselves have
experienced both sympathy and
harassment from those who have
been following the case. Confer-
ring with lawyers and arranging
benefits to pay legal costs have
taken up much of the students'
time. Mary Barkey, '68, was
scheduled to go to Italy last sum-
mer to continue her education
there. Her parents sent her sister
instead because she had to stay
in Ann Arbor.
Instructors S'ympathetic
The students are taking most
of their final examinations this
semester 'as take-homes, because
the trial begins the week finals
are scheduled. "Our instructors
have been wonderful," Miss Frank
says.
However not everyone is sym-
pathetic. Miss Frank and Hubert
Cohen have received several crank
phone calls, and Miss Frank re-
seived a letter signed by two men
who called her a "white trash
whore" and promised to "slit her
from neck to navel."
STUDENTS !
Pendleton Library on the
2nd floor of the Mich.
Union will re-open Fri.,
Dec. 8 as a co-ed study
hall. Hours during the
exam period will be 8
a.m. till midnight. Addi-
tional 3rd floor rooms

L A SOCIE DA D H ISPAN ICA
wil sponsor
UANA FIESTA DE NAVIDAD
Everyone including children, cordially invited
3050 FRIEZE BUILDING
8 P.M.-FRI., DEC. 8
No Admission Charge
FLY TO EUROPE
JUNE 12-AUGUST 14
PAN AM JET
LOW GROUP RATES
CALL DOUG, 761-2372
Open to Students, Alumni, Faculty,
and Relatives

MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM

Fri., Dec. 8, 9-12:30

Daily Classified Are Great!

Hear the Exciting Sound
of
THE APOSTLES
at
Pre-Exam FREAK-OUT
Mixer

m

tvillet

$1.00 guys
$ .50 girls.

I

Concluding Sabbath Service This Semester
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
DR. RAYMOND GREW
Associate Professor of History
Historical Patterns of
Nationalism and the
Modern Near East
John Planer will chant the Service with the Choir
directed by Steven Ovitsky with Joan Spitzer,
Organist.

1I

1429 Hill Street

All Welcome

--

will also be open
study hall.

for

FRIDAY and SATURDAY at:
8 30

1421 Hill Street

I

THE AiRK
GRADY TUCK
(from San Diego) singing sea shanties, blues, traditional and con-
temporary folk music, playing banjo, 6 & 12 string guitar, and
recorder.
$1.00 corer includes entertainment and refreshments

802 MON ROE
Friday, Dec. 8
NOON LUNCHEON-25c
PROFESSOR FREDERICK SCHERER
Dept. of Economics;
"CLASSIFIED RESEARCH IN THE UNIVERSITY"

Ann Arbor's
Quality Jewelry Store
carries a fine
selection of gems
to fit many .
budgets.
Christmas will shine when
you give her a gift from Bay's.M
RINGS
I Dr-)A EIFc - LAD D I KI'

CINEMA II
PRESENTS
D
R.
s
T
R
A
N
G
E
L
0
V
E
WITH
HENRY FONDA,
LEE J. COBB,
E. G. MARSHALL
& Chapter a
FLASH GORDON
eri A _. A

Sm m - m --- m m m -
College Relations Director
c/o Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washington, D.C. 20008
I
*Please senw n
a Sheraton student
- -DsoIcan saveup
ItoZ200on;
j Sheraton rooms.
*Addes
Reservations with the special low rate are confirmed in advance
(based on availability) for Fri., Sat., Sun. nights, plus Thanks-
giving (Nov. 22-26), Christmas (Dec. 15-Jan. 1) and July
] through Labor Day! Many Sheraton Hotels and Motor Inns offer U
student rates during other periods subject to availability at time
of check-in and may be requested.
Sheraton Hotels &Motor Inns
55Sheraton Hotels & Motor Inns in Major cities

I

Test Price a Pair of
MANSFIELD SHOES
For that rare combination of "look" and "price"
we offer you this distinctively styled Mansfield,
handsomely rendered in DuPont's new shade
of Meerschaum Corfam.* Corfam's ease of
care, scuff and abrasion resistance, indifference
to wet weather, plus Mansfield's superb crafts-
manship, make this a truly remarkable foot-
wear value. Many other Mansfield styles to
choose from.

L

I A .M TM.IA

In

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