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December 07, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-07

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAYIN

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a. s _. 1a t.I ~a aa iaaN BATT.V A j

ra i E THRiEE

p Baby Survives 7 Hours

CONGRESSIONAL ROUNDUP:
Meat Inspection Bill Passes;
Opposition Slows School Aid

After Hc

CHIEF SURGEON in the world's s
transplant, Dr. Adrian Kantrowitz
Brooklyn's Maimonides Hospital. T
the new heart died 6Y hours after su
NLF PAR TICIPA TI
Saigon, U.
O (nUN Pef

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (M)-
U.S. efforts through the United
Nations to make a start toward a
negotiated settlement of the war
in Vietnam are expected this
month. But sharp differences have
developed between the Americans
and their Saigon allies over par-
ticipation of the Viet Cong.
The U.S. Senate last week
adopted a resolution urging Pres-
ident Johnson "to consider taking
the appropriate initiative" to place
the issue before the 15 nation
Security Council. Johnson told a
news conference in Washington
on Monday that he would "con-
sider what is appropriate under
the circumstances" after confer-
ring with U.S. Ambassador Arthur
J. Goldberg and State Department
officials.
The conflicting views between
Washington and Saigon over the
Viet Cong role emerged after it
was- learned that the Viet Cong
had expressed a desire in October
to send representatives to the
9 United Nations.

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art Transplant
Yo"""NEW YORK W) - Doctors
transplanted a dead baby's heart
into the breast of a 22 week old
boy yesterday, but after 6% hours,
the heart failed.
It was the world's second hu-
man heart transplant, and the
first in the United States. The
two-hour operation had taken
place in the early morning at
Brooklyn's Maimonides Hospital.
The operation came just four
days after surgeons in Cape Town,
South Africa, took the heart of a
dead 25-year-old woman and im-
planted it in a 55-year-old grocer
whose own heart was failing. He
is in good condition in the first
critical days since his operation.
Dr. Christian Barnard express-
ed belief Louis Washkansky's body
will make no major rejection of
the new heart he received in an
operation Sunday. Rejection has
been the chief critical factor in
his survival.
Blue Baby
The 22-week-old baby boy was
born with a severe heart defect,
and was cyanotic or "blue" at
birth, showing a desperate lack
-Associated Press of oxygen in the blood. The de-
econd reported human heart fective heart valve impaired the
, described the operation at pumping of used blood into the
he infant boy who received lungs for freshening.
rgery. The heart came from a two-
day-old Philadelphia, Pa., child
O <that had just died of a gross de-
[)N: fortuity with which it had been
born.
10 Dr. Adrian Kantrowitz, heart
Sp iSt surgeon at Maimonides Hospital,
.told of the second baby's death
at a news conference.
"The baby seemed to be doing
reasonably well following the op-
eration," Kantrowitz saido"Seven
UN Secretary General U Thant hours after the operation how-
used to comment on the report. ever, the heart suddenly stopped."
e has decided it would not be in In the South African operation,
public interest to make any Washkansky is doing so well his
nment one way or to other," a surgeon says he may go home in
kesman said. three weeks if he continues to
k South Vietnamese spokesman improve.
d that their UN observer Nguyen Suppress Rejection
u Chi told Thant his govern- In Groot Schuur Hospital,
nt would object to a "propa- Washkansky j o k e d with his
nda" visit here by the Viet Cong. nurses, telling them: "I am a new
the statement, issued Monday, Frankenstein." He has been able
d the Viet Cong were a creation to take solid food for the past two
North Vietnam, and the United days.
tions "should forbid the Com- A cobalt radiation device and;
nists to use its tribune for such drugs are being used to suppress;
rposes as the propagation of rejection of the transplanted;
ir international subversive heart.
emes.
the United States and South
tnam are also in consultation
a Christmas and New Year's
y.pause in the fighting.
tate Department press officer
Bert J. McCloskey said Tuesday
t the consultations are under
y and that consideration still isI
ng given to the military stand
wn.
['RECESTM
PETERFINCH Ticket Office 0
MANBATES
DDING CROWDPRE
Noon to 9 P.M.
It Nowl Special Reduced.....................;.. >r;~
Rates for Students for
All Showings Sundays
or.1 Through Thursdays!
Mat. Wed. 2 pm Main
IFl. or Mezz. $1.80 Baic.
$1.45. Mat. Sun. 2 pm
_ Main Floor or Mezz. $2.40
1 Bale. $1.60. Eves. at 8 pm
-1 (Sun. t':0 anFloor 2
*or Mezz. $2.40 Bale. $1.605

,ke advantage of the student
ant rate present filled in ::::;<::::::>: " >}:;::I
n at. the theatre box offle:s;.":::e:: :::::::>":::t' ::.: >
der by ma W 1-3788 ,
Parking after 5:30 v.m.
d FRIDAY
ISE
nau, 1927~
beautiful motion2
love story. It is EN
rsonal, so moving,
ippeal of a fable.
fied; Murnau
i traumas of a man
wife and desire
emains a "Unique K.. _ _

-Associated Press
LBJ RECRUITS BUSINESSMAN
President Johnson sits in his White House office with David
Lilienthal, chairman of the private Development and Resources
Corp., which is trying to promote the economic and social de-
velopment of South Vietnam. Lilienthal was one of the Presi-
dent's "guest lecturers" at his cabinet meeting yesterday.
NEW INCREASES:
Rising Steel.Prices
May Boost Imports

plants.
Backers of the legislation to ex-
pand the 60 year old inspection
program hailed it as a victory for
consumers.
It was one of the consumer pro-
tection measures sought by Presi-
dent Johnson and he is expected.
to sign it shortly.
School Aid
In other congPrssional action,
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore.) an-
nounced last night he' will pro-
pose an amendment to the school
aid bill tomorrow designed to meet
some southern objections to the
government's handling of deseg-
regation proceedings.
Morse, floor manager for the
$14.2 billion measure, made the
announcement after Sen. John
Stennis (D-Miss.) had declared
angrily that the White House, the
Justice Department, and the Wel-
fare Department had sent down
orders to" kill all civil rights
amendments to the bill.
Stennis made this charge in the
midst of a lengthy speech in sup-
port of an amendment proposed
by Sen. Richard B. Russell (D-
Ga.). The amendment would bar
the Welfare Department from
cutting off federal aid or denying
an application for aid to any dis-
trict while a school year is in
progress.
Meat Inspection
House-Senate conferees agreed
earlier in the week on terms of
the meat inspection bill which is
designed to extend federal stand-
ards within the next three years
to 15,000 plants not now covered.
It stemmed from reports about
unsanitary conditions in some
plants around the country.
Under the bill, states will have
up to two years-or three if sig-
nificant progress has been made
--to set up inspection programs
for meat produced and sold with-
in their borders.
The Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee approved yesterday a bill pro-
hibiting discrimination in the se-
lection of federal jurors.

By The Associated Press Under the measure, jurors
WASHINGTON - Congress would be selected at random,
passed and sent to the White without regard to race, color, na-
House yesterday a bill to extend tional origin, religion, sex or eco-
federal meat inspection standards nomic status, from voter regis-
to all packing and processing tration lists or other broadly based

PARIS (P)-Black Power ad-
vocate Stokely Carmichael shouted
to a cheering, stamping audience
of more than 3,000 last night:I
"We want the Vietnamese to de-
feat the United States of Amer-
ica."
"Our aim is to disrupt the Unit-
ed States of America, and we
think our blood is not too high a
price to pay," Carmichael said
with reference to his followers in
the Black Power movement in
America.
Carmichael spoke at a six hour
rally sponsored by the so-called
Vietnam National Committee,
whose leaders say it has no link
with the French Communist party.
Speakers preceding Carmichael
mentioned Red China frequently

and the Soviet Union hardly at all
as they denounced what they
called American imperialism.
One French speaker, a white
man, called for a "black revolu-
tion in America to overthrow the
capitalistic system and establish
a separate black nation."
The 25-year-old Cat michael
broughth to its feet in the smoke
filled left bank rally hall when he
strode from the wings of the stage
brandishing his two clenched fists
in the air above him.
Official sources said French au-
thorities had granted Carmichael
a three month visa which they
said could be renewed on expira-
tion. They made no proviso that
Carmichael refrain from political
activity while in France.

lists to provide a cross section of
a community.
House and Senate conferees
agreed yesterday on a compromise
plan to cut government spending
this year about $4.1 billion.
The agreement reached by a

NEW YORK (P)-The newest
round of steel price increases
raised a knotty question yesterday:
Will it increase the spiraling im-
ports of steel?
American steelmakers have been
demanding that Congress limit the
amount of steel that can be
brought in from abroad. But in the
face of stiffening foreign competi-
tion they continued selective price
incrases on important products.
U.S. Steel Corp., the No. 1 pro-
ducer, and second ranked Bethle-
hem Steel Corp. yesterday an-
nounced their second price in-
creases in a week. U.S. Steel raised
galvanized and aluminum coated
sheets by $5 a ton. Bethlehem
joined only in the boost on gal-
vanized sheets.
Last Friday, U.S. Steel initiated
a $5 a ton boost on cold rolled
sheets which are used in the
manufacture of automobiles and.
appliances.

A major question was whether
European and Japanese steel mak-
ers would raise their prices on ex-
ports to increase their now slender
profit margins or hold the line in
an effort to expand sales in the
United States.
French producers indicated they
would try to take advantage of
higher U.S. prices to increase their
exports. West Germany steelmak-
ers said they hoped the U.S. price
rise would enable them to raise
their price.
The British SteelaCorp. said it
was too early to reach a decision
on a price increase. Officials of
three Japanese steel firms said
they probably will raise export
prices for cold rolled sheet.
Industry sources in Pittsburgh
said they expect foreign producers
to raise their prices. I
"Expectations are that imports
will be up next year any way, no
matter what we do with prices.

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majority of the conferees follows
an administration proposal to cut
personnel 2 per cent and non-
Vietnam war spending 10 per cent.
It was part of a package offered
by the administration to try to
persuade Congress to go along
with a tax increase.
Congressional leaders made it
definite yesterday they hope to
adjourn the present session by
Dec. 15 but listed a heavy sched-
ule of key bills for next week.

Carmichael Calls for Defeat
In Vietnam 'To Disrupt U.S.

U

AN EXCITING CHRISTMAS GIFT!
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vmmi M# MMM
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pen Weekdays 10:00-1:00 and 2:00-5:00

f'

FAR FROM THE MA-
Box Office Open Dailiy
SUMMIT THEATRE Wshingon Blvd.
and Lfeycte, Detroit, Mich. 48226
Enclosed is $.... O check O money ord4
forr.._.. .seats for the
performance sa
Yaw Name_
Address
To tak
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WANI~00 DT O . AT LAWAVETY11Free

I "

NOW THROUGH SUNDAY
Raves from the Critics!
"Nothing Short of Sensational!"... Toledo Blade
"Surging Power! ... Engrossing!". .". Ann Arbor News
"An Exciting Play!".. . Michigan Daily
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN POFESSIONAL THEATRE P3RR.
t.x
CATHLEEN VICTOR
NESBITT BUONO
IN
STUDS TERKEL'S
Scenery and Lighting by
ELDON ELDER
Directed by
MARCELLA CISNEY

ri il

THURSDAY an
SUNR
dir. Fred W. Murr

Sunrise, "one of the most
pictures ever made," is aI
so simple, so lyrical, so pe
that it has the universal a
Good and evil are personi
explores the psychologica
torn between love for his'
for a seductress. Sunrise r

I

I

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