100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 03, 1967 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-03
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4 .1

- - _

4

t

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1967

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

alE dE 'w J ?';Students Flock to State Resorts
To Ski During Holiday Season

FAIR THE-HOLIDAYS: zxQ
Romantic Velvets, Satin, Silk
Dramatize New Party Dresses [

By BARBARA MULLER
What does the first snowfall
mean? It means winter has final-
ly arrived, the days will be getting
shorter and you'll be walking to
your eight o'clock class in the
dark. It means traying in the arb
and dodging snowballs instead of
raindrops.
But to some students the first
snow means just one thing-ski-
ing. If that's what winter means
to you then you are in the right
state. There may be no real moun-
tains in Michigan, but it can
match any state in the midwest
in the number of ski resorts.
If you're heading for the slopes
you can find them less than an
hour's drive from Ann Arbor. Mt.
Brighton near Brighton offers in-
expensive skiing both day and
night: Monday-Friday tow fees are
$3.50, Saturday, Sunday and holi-
days the fees are $4.50. All night
skiing fees (after 6 p.m.) are
$3.50.
A little further away and a lit-
tle more expensive are Mt. Holly
and Alpine. These two resorts are
very popular with students for
short trips, and skiing is available
for $5.00 a day.

After driving about an hour and
a half you can ski at Pine Nob.
Tow fees are a little higher, but
the lodge offers an extra; a beau-
tiful view of the slopes where you
can eat dinner while checking out
the form of some of your fellow
skiiers.
Caberfae Ski Area is near Ca-
dillac and about three hour's drive
from Ann Arbor. It is the oldest
ski area in Michigan, and you can
ski there for only $4.00 on week-
days, and $5.00 on Saturday or
Sunday. If you plan to stay longer
than one day, accommodations
are available at motels, hotels, and
cabins in the area.
Boyne Mt.
Most weekend ski trips leaving
Ann Arbor are headed for Boyne
Country. Boyne Country is about
a five hour drive from Ann Arbor,
and consists of four different ski
areas under single ownership and
within a short distance from each
other. Boyne Mountain is popular
with advanced skiiers, but has ex-
cellent beginner and intermediate
slopes also. It is known for hav-
ing good snow, and good "after
ski" life. The tow rates are more
expensive than any of the nearer
areas ($6.50/day) but a ticket for
Boyne Mountain is interchange-
able with a Boyne Highlands lift
ticket.
Boyne Highlands is about 20
minutes from Boyne Mountain
and is popular with beginner and
intermediate skiiers. The slopes
have less vertical drop but are
very well groomed. The two small-
er areas of the four are Wallon
Hills and Thunder Mountain. They
are a little less expensive than
Boyne Mountain or the Highlands,
and tend toward a more family
atmosphere. Accommodations can
be obtained at lodges at the dif-
ferent resorts in Boyne Country.
Weekend accommodations at Boy-
ne Highlands Inn are $52.00 per
person for a double room. To cut
expenses on a trip, many students

SKI ATTIRE remains basically traditional from year to year for
skiers from Michigan to Aspen. Stretch pants, heavy turtleneck
sweater and quilted ski jacket are shown at Jacobson's, each $16.

"4 "A4 , " i NY3 1M L3 . " . " " s a i' '4 . C:. r. ' 'S

prefer to stay at motels or hotels
in the area.
Nub's Nob
Another area also about five
hours from Ann Arbor at the top
of the njitten of Michigan is Nub's
Nob in Harbor Springs. Lift rates
are less than in Boyne Country
($5.00/day) and the area is small-
er 'and has a family atmosphere.
The lodge is more accessible to
students, however, with a single
room available for $8.00, a double
for $7.00, and a triple for $6.00,
and four in one room for $5.00.
Rooms in a chalet are also avail-
able for about the same prices.
All levels of skiing are available
here, and the snow is good.
If you have more than a week-
end for your ski trip, and you
want some of the best skiing in
Michigan you might head for the
Upper Peninsula. All levels of ski-
ing are available at Indianhead
and Powderhorn ski areas. There
are more vertical drops and long-
er runs. The snow is deep and
there is more natural snow than
any of the areas in lower Michi-
gan.
Equipment
Anyone who goes skiing needs
equipment. Don't buy any! If you
are a beginner first make sure
that you like skiing, and that you
are going to ski more often than
once a season because ski equip-
ment can be expensive.
Equipment rents for about $5.00
to $7.00 a day.
'there are some essentials in
clothing even for the beginner
skiier; wool socks, a pair of leath-
er rope tow gloves, and long un-
derwear. It is the privilege of both
beginner skiiers and expert ski-
iers to wear almost anything on
the slopes. For most skiiers,
though, the generally accepted
outfit includes stretch pants, a
ski sweater, and a water repellant
parka.
When you decide you are going
to be a skier and begin buying
equipment, skiiers will tell you
that a good pair of boots (that fit)
are most important. The skiis are
next, with Head skiis generally
the most popular. Hart skiis are
also metal and. quite popular.
Wood skiis are good for beginners,
but are not as long-lasting as me-
tal skis. They are less expensive
but more difficult to repair if
damaged. Fiberglass skiis are be-
coming popular, but they are not
repairable.

By LESLIE WAYNE
Hold on to your hats guys, the
girl of your dreams is back.The
girl that whispers of Windsong as
she swishes by. You know the
type, the one, soft subdued and
feminine, who can make you run
a mile just by fluttering her long
silky lashes. No longer do you have
to contend with the maxi-boots
and patent leather skirts of Twig-
gy or the outer space girl covered
with hardware and gadgets. The
girl entering the Christmas scene
is coming packaged in ruffles, vel-
vets and soft satin bows.
The "look" for the 1967 Christ-
mas scene is one of traditional
romanticism. It is keynoted by an
emphasis on rich fabrics - dark
mysterious velvets, silks of the
Orient, and ruffles, long sub-
merged under the sleek look of
sixties.
" One of the hottest outfits of the
season is a little black suit with
ruffled blouse a la Yves Saint
Laurent. This man-tailored suit,
part of an Edwardian look and
last seen on Lord Byron, features

a short velvet jacket and a full
velvet skirt snuggly fitted over a
ruffled blouse.
Ruffles and Blouses
Ruffles have fluttered their
way back onto the fashion scene
knocking out the slick look with
one faint swish. Blouses are found
covered with them, especially
around the collar and cuffs. Lux-
urious is the only way to describe
these blouses as they feature long
satin Italian collars or soft silken
ascots.
Girls with waists are slipping
back as large belts are popping up
everywhere. These belts-the big-
ger the better-have been featur-
ed in all types of materials: lea-
thers, patents and suedes. Fur-
ther emphasis is added by a re-
vival of the dirndle skirt. You
know, the skirt, fully gathered at
the waist, that makes a girl look
like a girl.
Although less flamboyant than
last year, the look for 1967 typi-
fies a special kind of elegance.
This new surge to the "old" uses
everything that was once luxur-

ious and hard to get. A further
decline in the flamboyant is noted
by a mixing of rich fabrics rather
than a mixing of rich colors. This
soft complimenting of textures-
tweeds, wools, and velvets-lends
a subtle contrast to the muted
tones of the season.
A Flicker of Glitter
Glitter, last year's "hot" item,
has remained but taken on a new
form. No longer is it the all-over,
knock-'em-out power package. In-
stead, it manifests itself in little
ways-slight touches like silvery
shoes, a silvery barette or purse-
but never a total dress, shoes and
hose combination. Glitter has al-
so made its way up to the eyes
with flickers of silver being brush-
ed through the brows, and over
the lids.
Jewelry, mellow golds in intri-
cate designs, lends to this roman-
tic air. Most likely you'll find the
Christmas girl of 1967 bedeckedd
with antique pins of pearl and
jade. Big news this season are
rings, in all shapes and sizes, to
be worn on one finger or all ten.
Anything goes--so long as it's
old!
So fellows, light the fireplaceeg<
and bring on the mistletoe. The
super girl of the sixties has trans-
formed herself into a shy demure
creature that poets once dreamed
about. Santa has brought you a
package you can appreciate all HOLIDAY
year round-or at least until the coed elegan
styles change! a contrasti

a ;ti

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

'i.
.
.
..
.F
.IT
..
..
"N
IT
IT

DON'T BUY
GIFTS
Until You've Checked the Most Popular Gift
Items Year After Year--at Substantial Savings
ALL WOOL U of M U of M U ofM
Jackets SWEAT- MUGS
Blankets SHIRTS
$7.95 up $9.50 up $2.98 $1.50 up
U of M CHILDREN'S
GLASSES CHILDREN'S T-SHIRTS
SET OF 8 BOOKS
$7.50 O K$1.25 :
RECOMMENDED BY
LEADING EDUCATORS
ALSO
BRONZE Gme -CERAMIC :
Boo% Ends Ash Trays
WITH SEAL Animals-Puzzles WITH SEAL
$14.50 Coloring Books $4.95 up :.
EVRY'HING IN BOOKS Artist Supplies
Latest 'ctn-Non -Fiction For Beginners and Masters
C k Boo' - Hobby Books- Cards O lC
Chess-Pirds-Dcogs-Fishing Wate Color Sets . . .. ...$..c up
Skiing -Carpentry- SailingWater Color Sets ... . 98c up
Hnme Decoration Pastel Chalk Sets..... .90c up
1 -I U f

GIFT IDEAS:
Gimmicks and Gadgets
For A Special Friend

PARTIES this season will I
nt in a long simple velvet go
ng trim.- Shown in Jacobson'

Come in and Say
Goodbye before
Vacation.

I
I
I
I

Love,
Student Book

By ALICE PREKETES
Another "season to be jolly" is
here and the University has once
again taken up the holiday spirit
and given students its traditional
Christmas present, final exams.
Inspired by the U's magnanimous
gesture students will take cherish-
ed hours away from books to dem-
onstrate their creativity in select-
ing original gifts for family and
friends. Here are some ideas which
may be of help.
Several of the/Ann Arbor mer-
chants have wonderful selections
of delicately hand-carved jewelry
and music boxes including a
cigarette coffin' which plays the
death march.
Room and apartment decora-
tions shouldn't be underrated as
interesting gifts. Among the new-
er things which have recently ap-
peared are mod box tables done
in brightly colored are nouveau
designs, unusual enameled copper
flower wall hangings, and a vari-
ety of antique-framed wall mir-
rors. The Crown House has re-
cently received a beautiful ship-
ment of Israeli brass. Or, for the
particularly daring, " T i g e r
Things," a complete line of bright-
ly patterned, vinyl covered bath-
room fixtures, may be just what
you're looking for.
Pancake Warmer
For your favorite Early Ameri-
can pancake lover an Old-Fash-

ioned Pancake Warmer is the per-
fect item. And how about a bacon
ironer to accompany it? Both are
found at John Leidy.
Puzzles are particularly chal-
lenging to the intellect, especially
the new jigsaw puzzles in abstract
designs.
For the younger set there are
large soldier drums full of Poppy-
cop candy and many new Christ-
mas books.
Utilitarian desk accessories can
also be original if you select one
of the unusual paperweights now
available or Gwen Frostic original
block print stationery.
If you must remain convention-
al in your gift selections Jacob-
son5s Gift Boutique has promised
a wonderful selection of perfume
bottles and you can always buy
the traditional Peanuts items. But
buy them in a bright color or an
unusual shape!t
Books, Games, and
Beautifcl Calendars

S S '" ~ai~& "t t~

K.:.

Service

-

I

I

-0V
WE HAVE A COMPLETE
LINE OF LEATHER APPAR
AND ACCESSORIES FOR
BOTH MEN AND WOMEN
2155S. State

at

Student Book Service

TENSOR
LAMPS
$10.50 up

ELECTRIC
RAZORS
at
Competitive
Prices

ATTACHE
CASES
20% off

PEN SETS
by
Sheaffer
Parker
Mont Blanc

. created for today
in the living tradition
of WEDGWOOD, a continuing

,. ..:. ."_s, " .k .,.., r r, r". at' . 'i . ....* __{,. .
.. .:...:.::> .,.,..:.';,:."s..*s'.su t.
You, Your Family,
and Your Friends
all expect THE FINEST
in Gifts.
You Will Be Happy
with your Selections from
JO IIN . LEIDY
601 and 607 E. Liberty St. a
NO 8-6779 Ann Arbor r

tradition of craftsmanship.
OF PHILADELPHIA .

pendant
ten dollars
earrings
nineteen dollars
and fifty cents

Huge Selection of Gift Wrappings-Ribbons-Tags-Foil
Open Saturday Afternoons Till Christmas
Also Monday Nights Dec. 11th, 18th till 8:30
ULRICH'S
ANN ARBOR'S FRIENDLY BOOKSTORE

I

MADE ESPECALLY FOR

&k~anderer - & San

208 S. MAIN ST.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan