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December 02, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1987

THE MICHICAN DAILY

PACE S _ I

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2,1967 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PA(F ~1~VE'4

c tv la "G.i

T

THE VANDALS
ANID THE
BROKENHEADS
. .. Hud Englehart
Cagers Playing Second
Fiddle to a Building
What in the world has happened to Michigan basketball?
With all the publicity being vomited all over the place about
the new University Events Building, press releases are forgetting
that there will be a basketball team playing in the superstructure
this season.
So, let's talk about the team on this the opening day of the
1967-68 season.
The glory days of Michigan basketball are no more. Or at least it
seems that way to many Michigan basketball fans. Last year the
Wolverines finished dead last in the Big Ten. The sophomores that
Head Coach Dave Strack was counting on to at least be in the race
for the title, made more than the average number of soph mistakes
and it showed.
Errant passing, errant shooting, just plain bad basketball
typified much of last year's season.
Practice sessions last year had a big shadow named "Caz" over
them. There was dissention on the team, perhaps because the remain-
ing seniors who had been a part of those glory days didn't realize that
Cazzie wasn't there any more. What was worse, the sophomores knew
that Cazzie wasn't there, and tried too hard to make the fans believe
that there were five-Cazzie's on the team instead of just one. It was
easy enough to say that it was a new season, that it was time to forget
about Cazzie Russell and the mark he left, that the thing that was
most important was winning the Big Ten, not the Cazzie of the year
award.
Sure it was easy enough to say, but to live with it day in and day
out was another story.
The 1968 version of Michigan basketball looks much the same
as the 1967 version personnel-wise except for the addition of Rudy
Tomjanovich and the loss of Craig Dill. Dave Strack is still the
Head Coach.F
But 1968 has carried with it one important difference for the
experienced junior team that Strack hopes will be able to put Michigan
back where it belongs in Big Ten basketball.
Cazzie has been gone for two years now and remnants of his
ghost have been scarcely evident in practice.
In contrast to last year's practice sessions, there is actually a
great deal' of enthusiasm being displayed. Dave Strack has even ad-
mitted that the team is much more enthusiastic than it was at this
time last season.
Anyone can walk into a practice session and find a lot of
chatter, a lot of laughter, and perhaps a lot of communication
between the players. Believe it or not, Dennis Stewart has even
been smiling this year. It's a true pleasure to find that he Is really
human after all.
Another thing that charges the air these days is desire. No one
says it, but everyone knows it's there. Strack has said, "This team is
ready to go," and the team isn't about to make a liar out of him. If
nothing else this year, Michigan basketball fans will see a team that
wants to win-win for Michigan, not themselves.
In their desire to win, a great deal of change has been
evidenced by a type of play that was totally lacking on last year's
team, save the Michigan State game. It was not uncommon during
the course of the 1967 season to see one of the young sophomores
trying to make the big play all by himself. The word, and the act
of passing was almost taboo.
The 1968 season and the realization of just how poorly the team
did last year has made players like Stewart, Jim Pitts, Ken Maxey, and
particularly Bob Sullivan remember that passing is a big a part of
the game as shooting.
Michigan fans can probably expect to see the good shot being
taken more often this season. This is because all of a sudden the
whole team is almost more concerned with making a good pass than
with making the spectacular shot that makes charges of idiocy run
rampant through the stands if it is missed.
But with all the concern for passing, none of the players on
the team seems to have lost his touch for shooting. As a matter of
fact, the team as a whole has been shooting much better than they
were a year ago. It all makes sense because any team with the
potential talent of the '68 Wolverines will shoot better if the shots
taken, are taken in the clear.
Any good basketball players will admit that the most important
part of being a good shooter is the split second that leaves him in the
clear to execute the shot properly. That split second is given to the
shooter by his own ability to work against his opponent or the ability
of his teammates to hit him with crisp pass when he is in the open.
The whole process involves teamwork. Teamwork involves a closely
knit bond of communication between the players. The players don't
have to be the best of friends to have a high degree of communication,
but they do have to have respect for each other and each other's
abilities.
The bond is there for the Wolverines-they all want desper-

ately to win.
And maybe, just maybe, the 168 Wolverines have found the respect
for each other that was disastrously lacking last year.
Whether they have or not, no one knows, yet.
Perhaps Baron Von Rupp and his Kentucky Wildcats can
supply an answer.

Renfrew's

leers

By DAVE WEIR
It started out like any other
normal between-period re-sur-
facing routine.
But this time, the Ice Machine
ran out of gas just as it reached
the blue line.
Somehow, this little episode
which occurred after the first
period of last night's hockey
game seemed to symbolize per-
fectly the efforts of Waterloo
Lutheran's pucksters as they
dropped a 4-0 decision to Michi-
gan's undefeated Wolverines.
The visiting Hawks just couldn't
seem to get their offense moving
against the quicker and more
experienced Michigan squad. The
Wolverines dominated the game
from start to finish, outshooting
Waterloo, 47-18.
Sophomore Sensatons
Led by sophomore sensations
Dave Perrin and Barney Pashak,
who scored two goals each, Mich-
igan kept the puck in Waterloo's
end of the rink most of the night
to insure junior netminder Jim
Keough's first shutout of the
season.
Perrin led off the scoring at
4:10 of the first period back-
hand pass from Don Deeks by
Hawk goalie Ken Payne.
There was no more scoring in

Wayla
The score was Perrin's eighth in
Michigan's first three games this
year.
Play for the rest of the period
was slow, as neither team could
mount an attack until the last
three minutes. Then, with 2:12
left, Wolverine junior Doug Gal-
braith blasted a shot which sent
Payne to the ice on a sliding save.
Pashak then slipped the re-
bound into the open net for his
first goal of the night, and Mich-
igan went to the dressing room
with a 3-0 lead.
Pashak
Michigan completed its scoring
midway through the final period,
with the honors once again going
to Pashak.
This time the sophomore for-
ward took a pass from Ron Ullyot
and sent Payne to his knees with
a bullet shot.t
Pashak then picked up his own
rebound and rammed the puck
home over the netminder's out-
stretched body.
Soon after this, violence erupt-
ed in theWaterloo end of the ice,
ed in the Waterloo end of the ice,
locker rooms for fighting.
Bruce Koviak and Paul Domm
of Michigan, and Bob McMullen
and Ian Lightfoot of Waterloo,
all received five minute penalties
as a result of the scuffle.
Keough to Payne
During the confusion of deter-
mining penalty-box seat allot-
ment following these infractions,
goalies Keough and Payne amused
themselves by passing the puck
up and down the ice.
Before the end of the match,
three more penalties had been
called, filling the 'jail' to capacity

Waterloo

FIRST PERIOD SCORING: M -
Perrin (Deeks) 4:10. Penalties -
M - lord (Interference) 5:50. W -
MacDonald (Interference) 9:38; Seil-
ing (Tripping) 11:03; McMullen (El-
bowing) 19:04.
SECOND PERIOD SCORING: M -
Perrin (Domm) 1:29; Pashak (Gal-
braith, Hansen) 17:48. Penalties --
W -- Arnott (Crosschecking) 3:50;
McMullen (Tripping) 10:18; Voyles
(Holding) 19:36.
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: M -
Pashak (Ullyot) 10:19. Penalties -
W - MacDonald (Interference)
11:37; McMullen (5 mi fighting)
and bringing about a 'Standing,
Room Only' situation.
Michigan Coach Al Renfrew
praised the work of both goalies
after the game, but was not
overly-satisfied with his squad's
offensive play.
"We took a lot of shots on goal,"
he noted, "But we didn't put the
puck in very well. Waterloo was
quite tough in front of their
own net."
Potenial
Waterloo Coach Ted Maki said,
"We played up to our potential,
but we're a young and unexper-
ienced team." (All but four of the
Hawk players are freshmen.)
The loss dropped Waterloo's rec-
ord to 3-3-13on the season. Mich-
igan is now 3-0.
The same two teams play to-
night at the Colesium at 8:00.

Season's First Keough Kayo
the first period, although Mich- again at the Waterloo blue line,
igan came close several times. but Payne stopped the rolling

13:31: Lightfoot (5 min fighting)
13:31. 11 - Koviak (5 mini fighting)
13::31: IDomm (5 in fighting) 13:31;
Deeks (Crosschecking) 16:41; Gross
(Interference) 16:41; By s p a l k o
(holding) 17:59.
Saves:
Payne (W) 14 20 9-43
Keough (M1) q 5 4-18
Girl Tankers
StrnyTested
"Seven in '67."
This faintly familiar motto be-
longs to the Michigan girl's swim-
ming team as they travel to Wayne
State today to compete in the
biggest girl's invitational meet in
the country.
For the past six years the Wol-
verine girls have come home with
the title, and hope to bring home
number seven tonight.
The entrees, both individual
and schools, are expected to ex-
ceed last year's total of 22 and
represent such places as North
Carolina, New Jersey, and Arizona.
According to Lynn Allison, team
captain, the stiffest competition is
expected to come from Kent State,
a perennial rival, and Central
Michigan.
Two weeks ago today, in the All-
Michigan Meet at Adrian (six
schools), Michigan just edged out
Central, 112-106 for the title:
Girls like breaststroker Joanna
Cook, freestyler Mary Bennette
and diver Lannie Loken (gym-
nastic coach Newt Loken's daugh-
ter), will hold up the individual
events for Michigan. However, the
team's strength is in the five relay
events. "We're stacked to the hilt
in the 400 freestyle relay," said
Miss Allison.

Perrin snatched up another
Deeks' pass with eleven minutes
left and skated in on Payne, only
to have his shot stopped at point-
blank range by the Waterloo goal-
tender.
Then, with less than three min-
utes remaining, Deeks fed Perrin

puck inches short of the line after
Perrin lost control.
The second Wolverine goal
came after only a minute and a
half of the second period when
Perrin took a Paul Domm pass
and drilled a fifteen-footer past
Payne into the open corner of the
net.

Board Appropriates
Money for Yost Dirt

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NBA Standings

The Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics last night ap-
propriated $35,000 for the sur-
facing of the dirt interior of Yost
Fieldhouse.
The new surface, due to be in-
stalled by the winter semester this
year, will consists of an asphalt
base covered with a new rubber
compound recently developed by
U.S. Rubber. The surface will be
available for use by the Intramural
Department for basketball and in-
door tennis.
Indoor varsity track meets will
also be held on the new surface.
The facilities will be adequate for
every type of indoor intercollegiate

track meet with the exception of
the NCAA finals. The finals require
an extra two lanes which will not
be installed due to spatial limita-
tions.
In other board action, William
Black was appointed to the newly
created post of building supervisor
for the new University Events
Building. Black has been active in
the building's construction since its
inception.
Contributions in the form of
pledges for the $7.4 million struc-
ture which will open this after-
noon were announced as totaling
$152,418.13 with $69,398.13 already
received.

Boston
Philadeiph
.Detroit
New York
Baltimore
Cincinnat

Eastern Division
W L Pct.1
16 5 .762
hia 16 7 .696
13 10 .565
11 13 .458
9 11 .450
i 9 12 .429

Behind
1
4
6V2
7
1I
6
12
12'/z
15Y,

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DOUG HELLER

Western Division
xSt. Louis 19 6 .760
xSan Francisco 18 7 .720
Los Angeles 12 11 .522
Seattle 7 18 .280
Chicago 6 18 .250
San Diego - 4 22 .154
x-Late game not included.
Yesterday's results
Baltimore 123, Cincinnati 109
Philadelphia 133, Seattle 109
Boston 123, Los Angeles 119
Chicago 102, New York 100
St. Louis at San Francisco, inc

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UNIVERSITY CHARTER FLIGHTS
DETROIT - LONDON - DETROIT
MAY 9-JUNE 20 ... ...$205
MAY 20-AUGUST 19 .......$230
JUNE 27-AUGUST 23 ........ $250

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761-2348

SIGN-UP

S5-7 p.m.

-11

Ask for JOE MASON or BILL RAYMER
Seats now limited - $100 deposit

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This is the final decision based on the requests of those
Houses who asked for extra time to prepare musical ma-
terial. If your House (s) wish to participate please fill out
this application and send to the IHA PR., Mailbox 1511,
SAB-Remember, this is your positively last chance, so

INNER CITY COURSE

MASS MEETING

r------------------------------------- -------------
IHA SING APPLICATION
I B
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I Boys House ___ ______Girls' House ______________

SUNDAY. DEC. 3

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