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August 29, 1967 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAIN DAILY

TUESDAY, AU

P4Gw FOU3 THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, AK

Icers Seek to Recoup Loss of Stars

By DAVE WEIR At any rate, the puck simply
Every sport has its own Big ! failed to bounce in Michigan's di-
Play: that individual mark of ex- rection late last spring, and a
citement which distinguishes it chance for extraordinary record
from every other athletic event., dissolved into a mediocre 19-7-2
In hockey, the real crowd-pleas- mark.
er occurs when the player wearing Mediocre, that is, relative to
number 9, traditionally the num- what have been. For, regardless of
eral of the superstar, takes the how you cut it, 19-7-2 is a fine
puck on a breakaway and skates mark. Especially when it is re-
in on the opposing team's goalie membered that Michigan plays in
all alone for a shot. the conference generally consider-
But Big Plays are infrequent ... . ed as the toughest in the nation's
instead, an accumulation of little college ranks.
ones make up the average game. But still there remains that
Likewise, great number 9's are hauting question: what happened?
few and far between . . , and a The Wolverines jumped off to a
conglomeration of players with tremendous start, winning.ten and
differing skills and handicaps tying one of their first eleven
make up the average team, games. That was mid-season-the
The trick of turning a good puck end of Christmas holidays. In-
team into a great one is to achieve cluded in that record were two
the best combination of players at tournament trophies chalked up
the right time. There can be little lover the holidays, and four vic-
doubt that any team reaches a tories over arch-rival Michigan
certain indefinable peak during State.
any given season. At that point, Wakabayashi
it plays together as a unit; its Then, off-term graduation grab-t
members have a mutually rein- bed Michigan's outstanding "num-
forcing "spirit"; and consequently, 'er 9"-Mel Wakabayashi. The
its won-lost percentage moves up- little Canadian speedster had rack-
ward. ed up 37 points in the opening

had been the bulwark of the teamI
for three years, the "Blue" pulled
together after that one loss and
ripped (reeled) off six consecutive
wins against some of the toughest
teams in the league.
It was during this win skein
that the Wolvverines played to-I

Peacked Too EarlyI
Looking back over last year's
WCHA hockey season, it appears
that Michigan's ice squad reached
its peak too early, and that the
late-season collapse which dropped
the Wolverines from first to fourth
plate in the league standings was
a natural turn of the "cycle."

eleven games on 17 goals and 20
assists.
Although the Wolveriens suffer-
ed their first loss in the next game
-a 7-5 defeat at the hands of the'
Denver Pioneers-'Waka' wasn't
really to be missed until later.
Because ironically enough, de-
spite the fact that Wakabayashi

gether exceptionally well "as a
team." Opposing coaches credited
them with "team spirit" and "ex-
tra effort" in post-game locker
room interviews.
Then, if ever, Michigan reached
that nebulous "peak'-that nearly
unbeatable combination of desire
an dability-which transforms an
average bunch of guys into a great
team.
But the bubble had to break.
Predictably, the streak ended up
in Houghton-the home of ever-
tough Michigan Tech in a hard-
fought (4-2) loss.
From then on, the Wolverines
were just another team-winning
three and tying one of their last
ten games.
* * *
But, overall it was a succesful
year, and as head coach Al Ren-
frew philosophized at season's
end: "We won our share of the
game and saw our share of the
excitement. We have no com-
plaints about last season. Now we
are looking ahead to the 1967-68
schedule."
The Wolverines have lpst six }
players besides Wakabayashi to
graduation. Only one - Mark
Thompson - was a defense man.
The other five played forward and GOLF COACH BERT KATZENM
were the nucleus of last year's of- are Harry Englehart, Frank Grov
fensive attack. They include Dean
Lucier, Bob Boysen, Danny Wal-
ter and 1966-67 captain Mike
Marttila. Fnil 31' G(
Also, last year's top scorer,
winger Bob Baird, has only one
semester of eligibility left. Ren- I saI.y~ai-
frew expects to use him "only on Ed( fII3 IE 5E
power plays, etc., since he won't
be able to play in the conference By DAVID KNOKE
games next spring," Mcia' oftashdti
Baird racked up 46 points last Michigan's golf teams had this
seasoi on 21 goals and 25 assists thing about the Big Ten Chai-
even though he missed two games pionships. Like placing second in
due to injuries. Wakabayashi was each of the last three years. Play-
second on the team in scoring with ing the bridesmaid was ususally
37 in 11 games. accompanied by the loss to grad-
Little Optimism uation of the Wolverines' best in-
But ther reaso fo optimism dividualist.
amtther ireaonfooptismince.Next year promises to break the
among Wolverine followers, since jinx for Bert Katzenmeyer's links
5 juniors and 7 sophomores return squad. All six individuals who
from last year's regular unit. turned in a sterling performance
Four experienced defensemen in the wind-swept Big Ten tour-
are back, including this season's ney will be back.
team captain Bill Lord. The other Purdue won the Big Ten crown
three are all second-year men- for 1967, but the Wolverines rallied
Paul Domm, Lars Hansen and Phil after falling behind 18 strokes on
Gross. the first day to cut the Boiler-
Six forwards return: seniors makers' margin of victory to
Ron Ullyot, Bruce Koviak and Lee eight.
Marttila, younger half of the Captain-election John Schroeder
brother combo; and juniors Doug finished fourth in individual hon-
Galbraith, Randy Binnie, and Jer- ors at 309 to pace the team's 1,562
r'y Hartman. Hartman also plays' stroke effort. Purdue and Michi-
defensive safety on the football gan were the only schools to be
squad, so he will miss the first gin te initatios to te
part of the hockey season. given team invitations. to the
partBofthe ockhe easo. gsNCAA tournament from their dis-
Both of the regular goalies, trict.

'A

MEYER laces a drive down the fair way as the Michigan golf squad for 1967 watches. From left to right
ves, John Richart, John Schroeder, Rod Sumpter, Dave Graff and Bob Barclay.
olf Squad Returns Next Season;
Hope To Break Runner-up Jinx

d

BOB BAIRD

.. ...
,

'3

18 aroqgue Insrufeflt$
rnadt CA

0

tain Bob Barclay. Barclay in fact
faced such rugged competition
from the sophomores late in the
season that he was unable to
maintain his position as a starter.
Coach Katzenmeyer is obviously
pleased with the depth of talent
which he will have to work with
this fall and next spring.
"It's very unusual that a full
team will be returning," said Kat-
zenmeyer, now in his 21st year as
head links coach for the Wolver-
ines. "We'll be very strong on that
basis along, augmented by any-
thing the freshmen can do."
The Wolverines are rapidly
moving towards an intercollegiate
schedule with almost sole emphasis
upon tournaments. Next year the
only scheduled dual meets are
pair of exchanges with Michigan
State.
The links squad faces an early
test before the snow is off the
Ann Arbor ground when it travels
Florida in late March for the
Miami Invitational. The Wolver-
ines have had fairly good success
obvious handicaps in being un-
able to practice outdoors.
Last Season
Last season the Wolverines,
playing consistent golf, finished
in eight place in the Miami In-
vitational.
j With a month's layoff while
the weather cleared, the Wolver-
ines had an easy time winning the
Alma Invitational. Even the ex-
tended hiatus at *finals did not
take the edge off Michigan in
a mid-week dual with Michiagn

State prior to the Northern Inter-
collegiate Tournament.
Sophomore Harry Englehart,
although he proved to be erratic
later in the season, won honors
in the 627-655 trouncing of State
by scoring a low 75.
The Northern Intercollegiate,
only in its second year, is already
being billed as a "preview" to
the Big Ten. This year all the
Big Ten schools sent teams and
so did Miami (Fla.), the Univer-
sity of Florida, Notre Dame and
a representative of the Mid-
American Confernece. However,
attendance at the. Northern .will
probably not be as good in the
future among the Big Ten teams
due to scheduling problems.
The Northern last year proved
indeed to be a preview of con-
ference finale. Two Florida players
stole individual honors after
Schroeder, in a bid to retain his
half of the co-honors from 1966,
had paced the opening round at
149.
Come-from-behind shooting by
Dan Oakley (300) and Richard
Spears (302) of Florida sank
Schroeder to a third place tie
with Steve Mayhew of Purdue
(304). Michigan's third round
proved disasterous after complet-
ing the opening day one point be-
hind eventual winner Purdue, 780-
781. Michigan finished out of the
running in fourth place.
MSU got revenge for their ear-
lier 28-point stomping in Ann Ar-
bor when the Wolverines traveled
to play the Spartans on the newly

opened MSU course. While the
eight-man team play rules per-
mitted two more Michigan golfers
to gain varsity experience, the
blistering pace of the Spartan's
Larry Murphy at 73 strokes proved
too much for the high-shooting
Wolverines as they lost 627-621.
Spartan Invitational
Michigan fared slightly better
that weekend in the Spartan In-
vitational. Michigan's two four-
man teams in the 11-team field
placed in second and fifth behind
MSU's - first squad. Sophomore
Mark Christensen played suffici-
ently well to nose out team cap-
Lain Bob Barclay and earn himself
a berth on the Michigan squad for
the Big Ten Championship the
following week in Ann Arbor.
Stiff winds met the sixty links-
men on the opening Friday 36
holes. Paced by Mayhew, a Purdue
senior, the Boilermakers managed
to forge a respectable. 791 to Mich-
igan and.MSU's 809 to raise spec-
ters of the privous week's Northern
results.
The facsimile proved reasonable
and Purdue's 1,554 edged out
Michigan's 1,562 and MSU at 1,583.
Mayhew's 69 in the Saturday af-
ternoon round gave him individual
honors at 298 after redeeming
himself from a disasterous blow-up
on the third round when he card-
ed an 80. Schroeder finished
fourth with 309, followed by
Groves and Richart, 310, Sumpter
315, and Christensen, 320,
(Conttnxied on Page 7)

Guitar Studio

Classical, folk, electric instruments, accessories, private instruction,
rentals instruments from around the world
209 S. STATE ST. 665-8001 ext. 1

Harold Herman and Jim Keugn,
are back. The two shared net-
minding duties last year. Keough
played 15 games, made 437 saves
and had a 3.00 goals-against aver-
(Continued on Page 7)

-r

Returning Golfers
Returning to Michigan team
next year wil be seniors Schroeder,
John Richart and Frank Groves.
Big Ten veteran juniors Rod'
Sumpter, Mark Christensen and
Harry Englehart will be back
along with junior Dave Graff, who
saw action in several tournaments
last year but didn't meet the stiff
competition for a berth on the
Big Ten and NCAA squads.
The only loss the Wolverine's
suffered to graduation was Cap-

We leom e

Students
.. to Todd's and the
University of Michigan

II8 M

1967

WELCOME TO WAGNER'S
"Buying your clothes from Wagner's"

A MICHIGAN TRADITION for

119 years

We're not trying to be stuffy or snobbish-but
don't come to Todd's if you're looking for the same
conventional clothing you can buy in other stores.'

BUT! If you are bored with the
Todd's is the only store in town for
have been created just for Todd's.
Plan to make Todd's your clothing store. We
know college students and we know what
they like. We are here to serve you with the
finest in men's clothing, in the newest style
creations.

conventional -
you. Todd's styles
8000 PAIRS
of CONTINENTAL
and IVY PANTS
to choose from,
priced from 4.98 up

A business that started far before
the memory of living man continues
to stand ready for another
year of service at MICHIGAN
ESQUIRE fashions at their best from the
finest quality houses in America.
SHOES from BRITISH WALKER, TAYLOR-MADE, ALLEN EDMONDS
CLARKS-OFENGLAND, HUSH PUPPIES, DINGO BOOTS
SPORT COATS from MAVEST, STANLEY BLACKER and PALM BEACH
SLACKS from HAGGAR, H.I.S. plus several WAGNER brands
SWEATERS from JANTZEN, TOWNESKING and LORD JEFF
OUTERWEAR, ZEROKING, PETERS, McGREGOR, LODEN FREY
car, stadium coats and zip jackets
SPORTSWEAR from ARROW, VAN HEUSEN, PENDLETON,
CISCO and McGREGOR
RAINCOATS from LONDON FOG and GLEN EAGLES
SUITS from HICKEY-FREEMAN, KUPPENHEIMER, KINGSRIDGE,
LOUIS GOLDSMITH, PALM BEACH, HASPEL and TIMELY CLOTHES

I

A

STA-PREST

4 #1 Levi's available
z s}. rin all styles
nd sizes.
o dds

The LADIES' MEZZANINE SHOP
features LONDON FOG and GLEN EAGLES rain

i Mk

HOURS:

1#

11

11

i

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