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November 28, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MMMMM"

PAGE SIX

THlE MICHIGAN 1i 11111w

TTTISCTI A ZT 7\Tf'1TTTYltXTfqmT) nth V AAA

i as aJ lea i V u V A 11 ll (11 Yl 1

TUESDAY, NOVEDiBER 28, 1967

I

irsrs
By DIANA ROMANCHUK j
This weekend saw the finale of
a disappointing football seasonI
and the unveiling of a promising
hockey team. p
With eight minutes gone in the
Wolverine 1967-68 hockey season,
Ron Ullyot took the puck at the
Michigan blue line and skating in
alone on McMaster goaltender
Chuck Lee, slapped home the
first goal in the McMaster demise.
Two games and 20 Wolverine
goals later, McMaster, as yet un-,
beaten in Canada (3-0). headed{
back to Hamilton, Ontario, to re-
cuperate from 10-4 and 10-3
beatings.
The games were as nearly iden-
tical as the scores. Both nights
McMaster held Michigan close In1
first periods, which ended 2-1 int
Michigan's favor Friday, and 1-1
Saturday.
AS Michigan Coach Al Renfrewt
noted, "we didn't play very weil
the first period either night mainly
because we couldn't get the puckI
out of our own end."
Blue Move
Michigan began moving in thec
second periods and left the icek
ahead 6-3 Friday and 6-2 Satur-I
day.
The Wolverine scoring ran in
sinillar modes, each night resting
on two hat tricks. Dave Galbraithr
racked up a triad plus one in thet
first game along with Dave Per-
rin, whose three goals came amidst x
a hat trick in penalties. Perr'.a re-f
Goals Assists Total Pts.t
Gis. Asts. T Pts.,

peated his s oring performance on
Saturday with Bruce Koviak
chipping in another trio of tallies.
Despite toe similarities there
was one main difference between
the two games - the number of
penalties called. The referees
meted out 30 penalties on Satur-
day compared to 12 the night
before. Michigan came out on the
better end, actually, with only 37
minutes and a game misconduct,
while McMaster suffered 46 min-
utes and a game misconduct.
Smash
The misconducts were the result
of the most spectacular tangle of
the night - a second period
cross-checking which led to flying:
gloves for Michigan captain Bill
Lord and McMaster's George Bab-
cock.
Yet, oddly enough, there wereI
only three power play goals in
the game.
Though happy about the two
victories, Renfrew expressed sur-
prise at the McMaster play. "We
expected them to be a lot strongerI
in the net and on defense. They
did have a couple of fast forwards,
but they just 'couldn't jell against
us. Actually, they're a better
team than the scores show." '
Pipe Reds Light'
But it is goals that win, andj
Michigan put the red light on

Two

Fro m

c1i z t

*

*

*

*

*

*

Varsity, Frosh

DOUG GALBRAITH

ON WATERS:
'M'Sailors '
Cop Regatta:
The Michigan Sailing Club,
represented by Chris Chatain and
Hans Meyer, defeated sailors from,
schools from every part of the

By HUD ENGLEHART
Going from high school basket-
ball competition to collegiate
competition is hardly an enviable
task to undertake.
And when the first splash in
the collegiate puddle is to be made
against a team that will start
four seasoned veterans, the task
is even more difficult.
Add to that the on-the-spot critic
that always attends Michigan
athletic contests and the whole
thing reaches cataclysmic pro-
portions.
Freshman basketball c o a c h
George Pomey and his version of
the Wolverines are faced with
this monumental dip in the pool
of Michigan athletics tonight in
Yost Field House as the Varsity
will be making its assault on its
first non-conference and non-
scheduled foe of the season.
Historical
Ironically the game will set the
.scene foi two beginnings and t«t o
ends in Michigan basketoall. The
game of course will begin and
end.
The game will also mark the
beginning of four years of basket-
ball for some of the freshmen and
the end of a long and glorious
history for Yost Field House. To-
night's game also will be the last
ever to be played in the "House
that Cazzie destroyed."
Barring a rain storm, there
won't be many splashes in Yost
before, during, or after the game.
For one thing the freshmen lack
the size to be able to take the
water out of this year's varsity.

Doug Galbraith
Dave Perrin
Bruce Koviak
Ron Ullyot
Randy Binnie
Don Deeks
Doug Glendinning
Craig Malcolnson
Phil Gross
Bill Lord
Barney Pashak

4
6'
3
2
3
1
1
0
0
0
a

4
1
3
4
2
3
2
3
i
1
1

S
7
6
6
4
3
3
1
1

ten times each night (not count- country over the weekend in win-
ing the two shots that hit the ning the 21st annual Timm'e
pipe Saturday). The most 'per- Angsten Memorial Regatta in
fect' tally Friday came with barely Chicago.
three minutes left in the opening - Meyer, with one first place and
period and gave Michigan back six seconds in 17 'B' Division
a 2-1 lead. With Galbraith wait- races, and Chatain, taking a pair
ing to the left of net, Bruce Ko- of firsts in the 'A' Division series,
viak blazed a pass from the cor- amassed 476 points to give Mich-
ner, which Galbraith just tap- igan the team title.
ped by Lee. Resha Miller crewed for Cha-
McMaster tried changing goal- tain and Al Austin assisted Meyer
ies Saturday, replacing Lee with in the Michigan club's winning.
Ian Budge, but it still looked like effort.
a. rerun. The standout goal of the While neither skipper took in-
game was a breakaway by Perrin. dividual honors in his respective
As Budge moved forward to take division, the two-crew total was
the shot, Perrin faked, Budge enough to give the team a 15-
went down, and Perrin flipped point margin over the second-
the puck behind Budge into the place Coast Guard Academy.
open net. Individual titlist in the dinghy
regatta, sponsored by the Chicago
Collegiate Sailing Association, was
Richie Doyle, sailing for Notre
Dame.
Amk l"u MI--

The tallest man on the fresh-
men team is only 6-5 and the
varsity, although not laden with
height themselves, can come up
with at least six players who are
as tall or taller than freshman
center Tim Nicksic.
Also
Starting with Nicksic will be
Tom Lundstedt (6-4) and Rodc
Ford (6-4) at the forward spots
and Dan Fife (6-3) and Mark
Berg (6-0) at the guard positions.
Fife is expected to be the big
gun for the freshmen. He has a
fine jump shot and the moves
to work his way into the open
in order to take full advantage of
his shot-making ability.
Fife will probably be working
against the only senior on the
Varsity starting five, guard Jim
Pitts who averaged a little better
than 16 points a game last year
and matches Fife on the size
chart.
ROses Await
Indiana Trip
By The Associated Press f
BLOOMINGTON - Physically
and emotionally exhausted, Indi-
ana University's football players
and fans went back to classrooms
and jobs yesterday - but it was
a happy hangover.
And they were all ready to get
charged up again Dec. 21, the
tentative date set for the happy
hurryin' Hoosiers to board a
chartered plane for Pasadena,
Calif.
They're going early to get ac-
climated to warm weather before
taking on top-ranked Southern
California in the Rose Bowl on
New Year's Day.
Coach John Pont, whose 9-1
record has been bettered at I U.
only by the 1945 team's 9-0-1
mark, planned to let the team un-
wind for two weeks before
starting to wind it up again.
He also endeared himself to a
lot of program committeemen by
promising he would keep prior
speaking engagements this month.
Nobody was in a hurry to clean
up store windows smeared with
legends like, "A bucket makes a
wonderful Christmas present,"
and "John Pont for president."
The Indiana-Purdue game is for
the Old Oaken Bucket.
PRO SCORES
ABA
Houston 101, Pittsburgh 87
Kentucky 138, New Jersey 100

Clash
Although the entire varsity
squad will see action, the starters
will be Pitts (6-3) and Ken Maxey
(5-9) at guard: juniors Dennis
Stewart (6-7) and Bob Sullivan
(6-4) and sophomore Rudy Tom-'
janovich at forward.
The game has two purposes.
First, it will give the freshmen an
opportunity to show off their
skills for Michigan fans as well as
give them a little 'puddle tume'
in collegiate basketball.
Secondly, the game will serve
as a tune up for the varsity for
their opening game this Saturday
in the new University Events
Building against the Wildcats of
Kentucky. Head Coach Dave
Strack will be watching closely to
see the effects of his rotating
post offense.-
Cheers
But, no matter what the under-
lying bases for the game, it should
be a crowd pleaser. For one thing
there is no admission price.
Not only that but Strack is
planning to play three halves
instead of just the regulation two.
The first two halves will pit the
freshmen against the Varsity and
the last half will be an intra-squad
affair for the varsity members
who don't see enough action dur-
ing the first two segments.
The varsity is favored to win
the traditional battle but in
rivalries like this one even fresh-
men can learn to make big
splashes just for a win.
AP Taps Two
'AH' Gridders
For Star '11'
ALL BIG TEN TEAM-1967:
Offense'
Ends: Jim Beirne, Purdue; John
Wright, Illinois
TACKLES: John Williams, Minne-
sota; Dick Himes, Ohio State
GUARDS: Bruce Gunstra, North-
western; Gary Cassells, Indiana
CENTER: JIOE JAYTON, MICHIGAN
QUARTERBACK: Mike Phipps, Pur-
due
HALFBACKS: Leroy Keyes, Purdue;
Perry Williams, Purdue
ICON JOHNSON, MICHIGAN
Diefense
ENDS: Bob Stein, Minnesota, George
Chatios, Michigan State
TACKLES: McKinley Boston, Min-
nesota; Tom Domres, Wisconsin
MIDDLE GUARD: Chuck Kyle, Pur-
due
LINEBACKERS: Ken Kaczmarek,
Indiana; Jim Sniadecki, Indiana;
Ken Crter, Wisconsin
BACKS: Tom Sakai, Minnesota; Ron
Bess, Illinois; Torn Garrestson,
Northwestern
other Michigan players named to
the second team were offensive end
Jim Berline, middle guard Dennis 1
Morgan, and defensive back George
Hoey. Warren Sipp, Ray Phillips,
John Gabler, and Rocky Rosema
received honorable mention.

CLARK NORTON
- t~i ga9 Out]
Well, You Win Two
You Lose Three
"Four and six."
To an Englishman, it might mean "62 cents."
To a football fan, it might make no sense at all. And to a football
coach, it might mean a career.
After a post-game locker room interview with Coach Bump
Elliott following Ohio State's 24-14 bruising of the Wolverines
Saturday, a sportswriter casually remarked, "See you next year,
Bump." Elliott quickly replied, "I hope so."
A freudian slip? Perhaps. And not because he thought the sports-
writer might hang up his typewriter.
Elliott became acquainted with the "win-or-else" vultures on a
first-name basis this season during the midst of a five-game losing
streak, and even after his squad posted victories in three of its last
four games Bump has remained under fire.
That's because it's hard for anyone to get excited about a
4-6 record. It's like finding one ant in your picnic basket-not a
disaster, but it kind of takes the potato out of the old potato salad.
And you can't even say, "Well, you win one you lose one." Who
wants to have to say, "Well, you win two you lose three."
Elliott knows this as well or better than anyone. During his nine-
year tenure at Michigan, he has compiled a 43-40 mark, hardly in the
"Michigan tradition" of Yost, Crisler, and even Bennie Oosterbaan.
Nor has he come close to rivaling the success'of many of his present-
day coaching counterparts at other schools. Other than his 9-1 Rose
Bowl year of 1964, he has had no better than a 6-3 record, and in
only three other seasons has he reached the .500 level. Pretty good
bait for the blood-thirsty.
But who can say whether Michigan's sagging football fortunes may
be traced to Elliott's effectiveness as a coach? There is nothing easier
than setting up a simple cause-and-effect relationship between a coach
and a losing team, and therefore there is nothing more appealing to
a simple mind.
Elliott's more astute critics point out, perhaps with some
justification, that he is unimaginative and inconsistent in calling
plays. But Elliott's decisions can be no more successful than the
degree of proficiency with which his players execute them on the
field. A coach can do only so much if the talent isn't there-and
this season Elliott's charges nearly beat some good teams with
what was, according to one of his assistant coaches, "mediocre
talent at best."
And to blame Elliott alone for inept play on the field is to ignore
one of the realities of modern-day coaching-perhaps the primary
task of a head coach today is recruiting, at which Elliott has proven
quite effective. The day-in and day-out teaching of fundamentals
at practice is generally left to the assistant coaches. As one of the
seniors on this year's squad put it, "Bump doesn't really do that much
coaching."
The entire question may become academic if Elliott is named
Michigan's new athletic director upon the retirement of Fritz Crisler
this March. Elliott is presently one of several candidates being given
prime consideration for the post, but he is by no means a shoe-in.
While many football fans have voiced a desire to "kick Bump
upstairs" (a consideration which is not, incidentally, expected to
enter into President Robben Fleming's final decision this Febru-
ary), Elliott faces competition from several men who have estab-
lished top-flight credentials in collegiate and professional
athletics.
Among others apparently in contention are Don Lund, Director
of Player Personnel of the Detroit Tigers, Forest Evashevski, Athletic
Director at Iowa, and Davy Nelson, Athletic Director at Delaware.
And if Elliott, is not the man to replace Crisler, he may well
find his coaching position in jeopardy, at the mercy of a new athletic
director-a man whose first act, according to a top candidate for the
post, "should be to fire at least five or six coaches."
No coach who is a consistent loser will last forever in big-time
coaching ranks, and if Elliott can't win, he will in time seal his
own fate.
But Bump has won before, and if he's back, there's good reason
to believe he can win again.
Until then, everyone can wear buttons reading, "Michigan Foot-
ball Builds Character."

4

a

GOALS BY PERIOD

MICHIGAN
McMaster
MICHIGAN
McMaster

Friday
Saturday

2-4-4-10
1-2-1-- 4
1-5-4-10
1-1-1- 3

i ' -

AP-Preseason
Hardcourt Poll
NEW YORK (AP)-The Top Ten
in The Associated Press pre-season
college basketball poll for the 1968
season which opens Friday night,
Dec. 1, with first place votes and
last season's records in parenthesis

Still on Sale at
THE UNION and DISCOUNT RECOR,

KEEP AA
OF YOUR HAIR
* NO WAITING
0 8 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

t;
F:
r]

9

DS

sand total points on
5-4-3-2-1 basis:
1. UCLA (30)
2. Houston
3. Louisville
4.North Carolina
5. Kansas
6. Dayton
7. Boston College
9. Vanderbilt
10. Davidson

a 10-9-8-7-6-
(30-0) 300
(27-4) 226
(23-5) 213
(26-6) 167
(23-4) 135
(25-6) 129
(21-3) 84
(21-5) 48
(15-12) 46

(S. Univ. Store)

...

THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY IS INVITED
TO ATTEND THE SESSIONS OF:

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DAVE WEIR

THE COLLEGE STUDENT -1967
A Sesquicentennial Program of

The College of Literature, Science and the Arts
NOVEMBER 28, 29 and 30,1967
All Sessions in the Rackham Lecture Hall at 3:00 p.m.

The
smashing
after
shaven.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

28,

3:00 p.m.

I. THE STUDENT AS CITIZEN: a panel discussion

Moderator: D
Participants:

)EAN

WILLIAM HABER

STANLEY SWINTON, Assistant General Manager, Th
MICHAEL DANN, Senior Vice President for Programs,
CBS Television Network
ROGER RAPOPORT, Editor The Michigan Daily

he Associated Press

The United man
new stewardesses!
See him, talk to him,
listen to him, complete
an application form.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Nov.29
Call your Placement Office..>:"::: .
for an appointment .'.. , y \,A
UNITD AiR LINES : M ~ ''"''. ""'tc"L t2
U AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY '''' ?"
EMPLOYER "{ " {~

4

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 3:00 p.m.
II. THE PERSONAL LIFE OF THE STUDENT: a panel discussion
Moderator: PROFESSOR ARTHUR EASTMAN
Participants: DR. WILLARD DALRYMPLE, Director of the Health Service, McCosh

t,.,

I

Infirmary, Princeton University

ROBERT O
THEODORE

. SHULZE,

Dean of the College, Brown University

NEWCOMB, Professor of Sociology and Psychology, Associate

BRITISH
STERLING
So fine a gift,
it's even sold
in jewelry stores.
Aftar eheav,±

q

Director of the Residential College

I

11

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 30, 3:00 p.m.

II

II

M

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