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November 19, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EMBER 19, 1967

THE MICHIGA~N DAILY

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_,..__ ~_s.

PAGE SEVEN

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'"9 I

Grayle Howlett
O@FF BASE-- _ ___
MADISON
Wisconsin is like the maraschino cherry on top of a hot fudge
sundae. You like to leave it to the last.
At least, that must have been the delectable thought of the
Michigan footballers as they tried to regroup after their fifth straight
loss to Minnesota. Looking to the last half of the season, Wisconsin
must have loomed big-not because anything would ride on the game,
but because it would probably be the only laugher on the schedule.
Wisconsin is such a "breathier" that they would be considered a
worthy opponent for Notre Dame.
They like to talk about Ron Vander Kelen'up here and the
1962 Wisconsin team which finished second in the nation and
represented the Big Ten in the Rose Bowl. They like to talk about
it so. much that it; seems like everybody spends their Saturday
afternoons doing it. The Dow Chemical interviews drew more on
the Madison campus than yesterday's game.
Yesterday's 27-14 may not be reminiscent of the 50-7 slaugter
of the Badgers in 1965, but the way things have been going for the
1967 edition of the Wolverines, it was quite comparable. For one thing,
the 27 makrers were the most for the Wolverines this year. For another
thing, the passing game finally got untracked as Denny Brown clicked
on two scoring tosses.
Before yesterday, Michigan had tallied only one via the air ways
(a seven-yarder to, Jim Berline last week against Illinois). Also, the
passes were of the "bomb" variety, as Brown-to-Berline was good
for 60 yards, and Brown-to-Ron Johnson netted 31 yards.
As Wolverine fans know, the bomb is not in Michigan's repertoire.
In fact, it is probably our worst play. But that's Wisconsin-they bring
out the worst in you. As one. scribe in the press box noted, "You've
only thrown one TD pass up until now? Well, in that case, you came
to the right place to break the slump."'
If Wisconsin lives up to their present form, "they shall inherit
the earth." Only the meek lose to Pittsburgh. The Badgers haven't
had a perfect season-they did manage to tie Iowa an event which
caused one Hawkeye rooter to describe his team's efforts as a "moral
loss."
After the game, the press was informed that Wisconsin head
coach John Coatta would meet with them in the team physician's
office, a place, no doubt, chosen by necessity instead of for
convenience.
Upon entering, the first sight was that of a rather dour-
looking skeleton. The next was of its twin, Coatta, who looked
rather "picked clean" by an 0-8-1 record.
He mumbled the usual comments about how good the Michigan
team was ("as good or better than any team we've played") and how
excellent Brown was ("real good, real fast"), but his heart wasn't in
It. He kept running his hand through his gray hair, and all his sen-
tences trailed off at the end.
To one question about what happened in an obvious lapse by a
Wisconsin player, Coatta leaned back and in frustration muttered,
"I just don't know what the hell happened to him there." Not the
usual hedging quote, but Wisconsin isn't even the usual team.
Wisconsin does have some bringt spots which might bring a
halt to the deemphasis of football on the Badger campus. Mel
Reddick, a Chicago sophomore, looks like an All-American split
end. He caught five passes for 85 yards yesterday, and displayed
the marvelous football ability of being able to "get off by himself."
Also, Wisconsin will have an experienced quarterback in John
Ryan, who will be able to get the ball to Reddick. Ryan has started
much of this year, but a late season slump brought on his replace-,
ment, John Boyajian ("just call me John").
Wisconsin did officially lose one member of its family yesterday
when Michigan captain Joe Dayton presented the game ball to Presi-
dent-Designate Robben Fleming, the former Chancellor at Wisconsin.
Michigan coach Bump Elliott introduced Fleming as "a former
Badger, but now a Wolverine," an announcement which produced a
cheer from the team and a sigh of relief from Fleming.
It was learned after the game that Minnesota had destroyed
Indiana, and all the Gophers needed was a win over Wisconsin next
week to send them to Pasadena for New Year's Day.
Talk about saving the maraschino cherry till last.

Wolverines

Bomb
{Continued from Page 2}
Michigan 34 on the last play of the
first quarter. It was the 885th
yard of the season for Johnson
as he passed Tom Harmon's old
Michigan rushing record of 884.
Two plays later Dennis Brown
rolled out for twenty-two yards to
the Wisconsin 39, but lost 13 yards
on the next play.
With third and 19 on the Wis-
consin 48, Brown pulled the first
of his miracle third-down plays,
a 37-yard pass to Johnson.,
Johnson was originally a safety-
valve receiver near the sidelines
but Brown was chased around the
Michigan backfield so long, gc-
cording to Elliott, that Johnson1
just headed upfield. This made it
a bomb, the first of the afternoon.:
Two rushes by Gabler did the
trick. and the Wolverines had a
14-7 lead.1
On the first play Michigan hadt
the ball in the second half, Ron
Johnson lost three yards. On the'
second play, Brown hit Berline
with a picture-perfect pass. Ber-
line broke a tackle by Mike Cavill
and siooted into the end zone to
complete a 60-yard play.1
At this point, the Michigan as-
sistant coaches spotting the game

Hapless

Badgers

from the press box went wild,',the second time with bad ankle.
banging the glass and jumpinI Dennis Brown was racked up and
around. Dick Vidmer replaced him.
The second time Michigan got After Wisconsin scored on an
the ball in the second half, they eight-yard run by Boyajian, John-
went 74 yards in 10 plays. With son was hurt returning the ensuing
third and 20 on the Wisconsin 31. kickoff. Ernie Sharpe replaced
Brown threw to Johnson who made him, but by now the Wolverines
a spectacular catch in the left flat weren't going anywhere. Then, on
and continued on to score. the second-to-last play of the
Frank Titas, who had been game, Sharpe was layed out flat.
three-for-three in extra points hit According to Elliott, "On the!
the crossbar with his fourth at- surface, it looks as if no one was
tempt so the Wolverines had to hurt too badly."
setlle for a 27-7 lead. Wisconsin linebacker Ken Criter

Right after this, Mike Ryan re-
placed Boyajian as the Wisconsir
signal-caller. On his first play, as
the press box annooncer noted, "he
rolled out with the entire state of

broke both Frank Nunley's Big Ten
records of 99 tackles (he now has
109), and the record of 45 un-
assisted tackles set by Iowa's Dick
Gibbs. Criter has 49. Both marks
hnr da~ b a se+v

line until the ball was snapped.
Two of them ran to either side of
the field. However, Wisconsin punts
were so high that Hoey had little
rooom to run and in fact many fair
catches had to be called.
Curtiss did have one fine return
that was nullified by a penalty.
Michigan's "sloppiness index," if
that's the correct name, continued
to be down with only one fumble
lost and one pass intercepted. This
was a far cry from earlier games
An exception to this was the 105
yards walked off in penalties. This
can be compared to the fact that
Michigan was pot penalized at all
last week against Illinois.
The extremes of Michigan foot-
ball were increased this week even
further than usual. Besides Dreh-
mann's 51-yard punt, he also had
a ten-yarder which had a fifteen-
yard personal foul penalty against
the Wolverines attached, and a 25-
yard "coffin-corner" kick to the
eight.

Michigan in pursuit." nowLeestlyear.
eeicign e up ywit. a ra
Ryan lost 19 yards. When Mich- Michigan came up with a great
igan got the ball again. Dennis new way of getting George Hoey
Brown fumbled away the ball on the ball on punt returns, so teams
the Wolverine 33. couldn't kick away from him. They
A few plays later Tom Curtis lined up Curtis, Hoey and Jerry
took a Boyajian pass off his own Hartman behind each other in a
shoe tops and ran 54 yards to the
Wisconsin 24.
Michigan once again went back-
wards when given a break, and lost
the ball on downs.

-Associated Press
MICHIGAN'S WARREN SIPP watches the ball slip from his
fingers as he is hit in third quarter action by Wisconsin tackle
Ron Bliss in yesterday's 27-14 Wolverine victory. The junior full-
back averaged 6.2 yards in five carries as a replacement for in-
jured Garvie Craw.

Then the injuries started. Dick
Williamson limped off the field for

Wisc'-ed Awaiy

./

/

Mich.

First Downs 21
Rushings i
Passing 9
Penalty 1
Total No. of Rushes 54
Net Yards
Rushing 144
Passing 244
Forward Passes Att. 21
Completed 13
Intercepted by 1
Yds. Intercept. Returned 54
,Punts, Number 3
Average Distance 27.3
Kickoffs, Returned, by 2
Yards Kicks Returned 75
Punts 37
Kickoffs 38
Fumbles, Number 3
Bail lost by 1
Penalties, Number 9
Yards Penalized 105
PUNTING
MICHIGAN
No. Yds.
Drehman 3 82
WISCONSIN
Billy 7 265

Wise.
16
9
5
2
43
126
124
27
11
2
4
7
37.9
6
101
4 0
101
4
1
6
43
2'i .3
39.7
Ave.
1.9
6.2
2.5
.5
1.5
2.8
5.0
7.0
2.5
3.1
5.4
2.6
3.3
-16

PASSING
MICHIGAN
Att. Comp. Yds. TD
17 12 232 2
4 1 12 0

D. Brown
Vidmer
Boyajian
Schumitsch

WISCONSIN
26 10
S 1 1

PASS RECEIVING
MICHIGAN

1
1
S

10
19
No
6
3
2
2

Berline
Johnson
Giabler
Mandich

Reddick
Schumitsch
McCauley
Fritz
Smith
Voight
SCOR
MICHIGAN
WISCONSIN

WISCONSIN
5
I
1
1
RE BY QUARTERS
7 7 13
Y 70 0

5 0
0
0. Yds.
118
90
23
? 23
585
7
3
t 9
t 3
L 17
0-27
7-14

"BALANCE OF TERROR"
Speaker: CALVIN MALEFYT
10:30 A.M.
"Humanism: Christian or Marxist?"
Speaker: Doctor Lester DeKoster
UNIVERSITY REFORM CHURCH
SUN., Nov. 19

Candidates for degrees in ...
Eng., Math
Meet the Man,
from Monsanto
Nov. 15, 16 & 17
Sign up for an interview at your placement office.
This year Monsanto will have many openings
for graduates at all degree levels. Fine positions
are open all over the country with America's
3rd largest chemical company. And we're still
growing. Sales have quadrupled" in the last 10
years . . . in everything from plasticizers to
farm chemicals; from nuclear sources and
chemical fibers to electronic instruments. Meet
the Man from Monsanto-he has the facts
about a fine future.

D. Brown
Sipp
Johnson
Gabler
Frederico
Sharpe
Titus
Vidmer
Boyajian
Bucciareili
Schumitsch
Smith
Voight
Ryan

RUSHING
M[CHIGAN
Att.
22
5
13
2
8
1
1
WISCONSIN
8
13
9
9

Net
42
31
33
1
3
22
J
7
20
40
49
23
10
1-16

Billboard r
The University of Michigan
Ski Club is holding an open
meeting tomorrow night at 7:30
p.m. in the Union Ballroom.
Hugo Bohm, professional ski
bum, will speak. Also, there will
be information available on the
club's Aspen trip.

NEW HOLLAND
- Division Sperry Rand Corporation
ENGINEERS
Internationally known agricultural equipment manufac-
turer offers unique opportunities for Engineers with an
eye toward the future.
A progressive company, New Holland, has experienced
outstanding growth while retaining the atmosphere of
individuals working with individuals and, as a division
of the Sperry Rand Corporation offers additional long
term growth opportunities.
For further information see our recruiter at Engineering
Placement Tuesday, November 21, 1967.

An Equal Opportunity Ermployer

1

I

II

f

SCORES

I

LAST CHANCE
to take the
Peace Corps Placement Test
ON CAMPUS
Monday-9 A.M., Noon, 3 P.M. 3524 SAB
Bring Completed Application to the Test

V

I

GRID PICKS
MICHIGAN 27, Wisconsin 14
Ohio State 21, Iowa 10
Purdue 21, Michigan State 7
Minnesota 33, Indiana 7
Illinois 27, Northwestern 20
Alabama 17, S. Carolina 0
USC 21, UCLA 20
Georgia 17, Auburn 0
Clemson 14, N. Carolina St. 6
Florida 28, Kentucky 12
Notre Dame 38, Georgia Tech 3
Oklahoma 14, Kansas 10
Tennesee 20, Mississippi 7
Missouri 10, Nebraska 7
New Mex. St. 54, New Mexico
N. Carolina 20, Duke 9
Oregon St. 14, Oregon 10

Utah St. 19, Utah 18
Texas Tech 31, Baylor 29
Moravian 19, Muhlenberg 8
OTHER SCORES
Central Mich. 34, Wayne St. 0
Harvard 21, Brown 6
NBA
Boston 116, Philadelphia 111
Chicago 132, Detroit 130
Los Angeles 127, St. Louis 107
Baltimore 101, New York 93
San Francisco at San Diego, post-
poned.
NHL
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 2, Minnesota 2
Boston 3, New York 1
Montreal 2, Chicago 2

--Npft-

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