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November 18, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 196:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 18, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a

Badgers Challenge

Michigan in

By DOUG HELLER
MADISON - Riding down the
main drag into Madison, one is
struck with an amazing lack of
the normal signs and billboards
proclaiming, "Welcome to the
University of Madison" or "Go
get 'em Badgers!" or other local
Chamber of Commerce gifts that
dominate the outskirts of almost
all Big Ten universities.
It seems as though there is a
downright reluctance by beauti-
The Michigan-Wisconsin game
in Madison begins at 2:30 Ann
Arbor time. It will be carried
locally by radio stations WWJ,
950 AM; WPAG, - 1050 AM;
WAAM 1600 AM, and WUOM,
91.7 FM.
ful, swinging Madison to admit
that the University's football
team exists there at all.
The same type of feeling hits
again at the bus depot, where the
students hang from the rafters
waiting to leave town before the
Michigan game.

Doesn't anybody here want to
admit Wisconsin plays football?
Apparently not. The Badgers,
who have gone generally down-
hill since their 1962 Rose Bowl
season under ex-Coach Milt
Bruhn, have not done anything
yet to change the trend under
rookies Coach John Coatta.
In fact, they've hit rock bot-
tom. Their record is 0-7-1, with
the tie coming against lowly Iowa.
They've even succeeded in losing
to Pittsburgh, the famous "pat-
sies of the East." Something like
this gives a team the same type of
inferiority complex the Wisconsin
student newspaper has. One of
their slogans read, "If you don't
read the 'Cardinal' - don't knock
it."
Bury
Despite the losses, no one is
ready to bury the Badger rookie
coach yet. For' one thing, Wis-
consin has looked better every
game. They've progressed a long
way since an opening 17-0 shel-
lacking by Washington followed
by 42-16 and 35-17 massacres at
the hands of Arizona State and
Michigan State, respectively.

MEL REDDICK

down, in addition to recovering
two fumbles.
Offensively there is running
back Vic Schumitsch. It seems
that 102 yards against Pittsburgh,
rushing, were not enough to make
him a starter. Schumitsch turned
that around Saturday, by coming
in and taking a short pass from
quarterback John Boyajian, and
running 51 yards for a TD.
Speaking of Boyajian, Saturday
was the best day of his career
as he completed 19 of 36 passes
for 252 yards 2to throw a scare into
Ohio State.
Armenian Power
Incidently, the Wisconsin quar-
terback situation goes Michigan
one better. Boyajian took the job
away from junior John Ryan
earlier in the season after both
of them beat out Chuck Burt last
year. And Burt was a sophomore
sensation the year before that
when he was tenth in the nation
in passing.
Now he is a bench-riding co-
captain who plays flanker once
in a while.
But Burt won't even get much
of a chance to catch passes Wis-
consin has piles of good pass re-
ceivers in its wide open offense.
In this system, the Badgers
abolish the niceties of label such
as "right end," "left end," "split
end," and "tight end."
Instead, they use what might
as well be called an "XYZ Sys-
tem" and where these guys will
line up is anybody's guess. "X" is

WISCONSIN

Defer

John Teitz (210
Don Bliss (231)
Ken Criter (205)
Bill Grisley (217)
Sam Wheeler (217)
Tom Domres (236)
Lyn Buss (213)
Gary Reineck (190)
Mike Cavill (177)
Mel Walker (180)
Pete Higgins (185)

LE
LT
LLB
MLB
RLB
RT
RE
LCB
LS
RS
RCB

'Ho-Hum' Madisoi
THE LINEUPS
Ise Offense
MICHIGAN WISCONSIN MICHIGAN
Phil Seymour (195) Mel Reddick (177) "X' Jim Mandich (215)
Dick Williamson (227) Brant Jackson (236) LT Bob Penksa (225)
Tom Stincic (217) Don M~urphy (210) LG Ray Phillips (229)
Dennis Morgan (215) Rex Blake (195) C Joe Dayton (226)
Rocky Rosema (225) Wally Schoebsow (222) RG Bob Baumgarter (219)
Dave Porter (231) Ed Hoffman (223) RT Pete Mair (228)
John Kramer (215) Bill Fritz (218) "Y" Jim Berline (185)
George Hoey (169) John Boyajian (197) QB Dennis Brown (176)
Tom Curtis (184) Vie Schumitsch (192) TB John Gabler (208)
Jerry Hartman (170) Gale Bucciarelli (193) FB Ron Johnson (196)
Brian Healy (170) Tom McCauley (185) "Z" Frank Titus (205)

It's not that Coatta (pronoun-
ced cote-uh) has no material. In
fact, Ken Criter, a junior line-
backer, was named Midwest Line-
man-of-the-Week after the loss
to the Buckeyes. Criter leads the
Big Ten with 90 tackles. He even
has a chance to break former
Michigan linebacker Frank Nun-
ley's Big Ten record of 99 tackles,
set last year.
The omipresent Criter isn't the
whole defensive show, though.
Right tackle Tom Domres could
make an appearence or two in
the Michigan offensive backfield
before the afternoon is over. And
sophomqre right safety Mel Wal-
ker has intercepted five passes,
running one back for a touch-

sophomore Mel Reddick, who has
caught 31 passes for 386 yards
and 2 touchdowns. "Y" Is Tom
McCauley, who only has 27 re-
ception for 390 yards. And "Z" is
Bill Fritz, who has caught 22
passes.
See, it's really very simple.
Then there's Tom Schinke. The
crackerjack placekicker and kick-
off expert is noteworthy because
he is also Wisconsin number one
kickoff-return man. This is not
what is usually called "protecting
your kicker."
Over on the Michigan side two
surprises greeted head coach Bump
Elliott. A bad one is that super-
blocking back Garvie Craw did not
recover from his injury as well as

t.

expected. Sophomore Frank Titus
may be given the spot over senior
Warren Sipp.
Making up for this is that sen-
or defensive tackle Tom Goss is
back after being sidelined three
weeks. Where he will play is un-
certain.

z

/11/el

II erI

U ES
I-M Scores

D SZO
ISRAEL STUDENTS ORGANIZATION

FOOTBALL ORGY :,
LibelsSwamp Newsies

FIN4L WRESTLING RESULTS
Fraternity Division
Phi Delta Theta 34
Chi Psi 23
Sigma Phi Epsilon 18
Residence Hall Division
Douglas 36
Huber 21
Wincheli 16

Concluding Program
INSTITUTE OF SOVIET JEWRY
SUNDAY AT 5:30 P.M.

Dramatization of Eli Wiesel's
THE JEWS OF SILENCE
Directed by Len Scalia

By DIAMOND MEL
Special To The Daily
EAST I.ANSING - The Daily
Libels swept into East Lansing
yesterday and astounded theex-
perts by thrashing the State News
team 6-6.
Playing on the MSU Intramural
field inside Jenison Fieldhouse, in
a game broadcast by the MSU
student radio station, the Libels
solilified their number one stand-
ing as the State team played for
a tie in the final minute of the
game.
The Libels kicked off to start
the game and immediately put
the clamp on the State News' at-"
tack by setting up in a deadly
3-2-2 defense. On the very first
slay, Libel captain. Ron Lands-
man burst Into the State back-
field and threw the quarterback
for an 8-yard loss.
After completely frustrating the
MSU offense, the Libels unleash-
ed their superior firepower, di-
rected masterfully by quarterback
Jim "Channel Six" Neubacher He
proceeded to dazzle the Newsies
with three incomplete passes and
a 4-yard quick-kick.
"'I his was when I 'first realized
the great potential of this team
of mine," Neubacher said after
the game.
After an interception by Neu-
bacher deep in Libel territory, the
"Magnificient Seven" began a

long march up the field. Two long
passes to right end Dan Share
and a delay to Mike "The Hip-
pie" Dover put the Libels in scor-
ing position for the first tme in
the game. Neubacher dropped
back and fired a bullet to Lands-
man who headed for paydirt only
to be stopped inches from glory.
Groovy
Minutes later, State pulled the
famous "cross continental" pass
play immortalized by Deke Shan-
kine in 1934. The Newsies were
aided on the play by the chalk
line which "reached up and trip-
ped" Libel cornerback Hank
Pfeffer. The ensuing touchdown
was nullified by an'1illegal pro-
cedure penalty,.
In the third quarter, Neubach-
er, rolling out to his left, connect-
ed with right end Dan Share on
the Newsies' 20-yard line. Share
weaved in and out of the State.
secondary and went in for the
first score of the game.
With about two minutes left in
the game, the Newsies sacrificed'
their morals and decided to play
for a tie. They threw another
"cross continental" pass for a
touchdown to tie the score 6-6.
When asked to comment about
this after the game, Landsman
said, "I think this clearly shows
which team has more class. We're
number one, no matter what any-
body says."

1. .1

SUNDAY, November 19
the CBS-TV Documentary Film
"THE TENEMENT"
". ..the most absorbing and most definitive
'indictment on poverty in our land to be put on film."
Presbyterian Campus Center, 1432 Washtenaw
6 P.M.-SUPPER (50c) 7 P.M.-PROGRAM
Please make supper reservations: 662-3580 or 665-6575
CHARGE IT!
PRESCRIPTIONS
i COSMETICS
f MEN'S
TOILETRIES
1112 South University Phone 663-5533
Highest Quality Alwaysj

following dinner at
DELI HOUSE
members $1.00

RUMMAGE
THE CHILDREN'S
COMMUNITY SCHOOL
TODAY-8 TO 2:30
ARMORY
SALE

friends $1,25

1429 Hill Street

All Welco

tF ._

*

son

I

nsa
N'O! TI ENG ONG,

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assignments or may even train
you in an entirely new language.
Demonstrated ability in
language research can lead
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sophisticated duties. The
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At NSA you will be joining
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NSA offers you this opportunity
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Do you fit the picture?
Where to go ... what to do

C
4

"' .
s,
.
i ,

S

N
p W

k "~ (By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boysl",
"Dobie Gillis," etc.)
FOOTBALL FOR SHUT-INS
At next Saturday's football game while you are sitting
in your choice student's seat behind the end zone, won't
you pause and give a thought to football's greatest and,
alas, most neglected name? I refer, of course, to Champert
Sigafoos.
Champert Sigafoos (1714-1928) started life humbly on
a farm near Thud, Kansas. His mother and father, both
named Walter, were bean-gleaners, and Champert became,
a bean-gleaner too. But he tired of the work and went to
Montana where he got a job with a logging firm. Here the
erstwhile bean-gleaner worked as a stump-thumper. After
a month he went to North Dakota where he tended the
furnace in a granary (wheat-heater). Then he drifted to
Texas where he tidied up oil fields (pipe-wiper). Then to;
Arizona where he strung dried' fruit (fig-rigger). Then
to Kentucky where he fed horses at a breeding farm (oat-
toter). Then to Long Island where he dressed poultry
(duck-plucker). Then to Alaska where he drove a delivery
van for a bakery (bread-sledder). Then to Minnesota
where he cut up frozen lakes (ice-slicer). Then to Nevada
where he determined the odds in a gambling house (dice-
pricer). Then to Milwaukee where he pasted camera
lenses together (Zeiss-splicer).
Finally he went to Omaha where he got a job in a tan-
nery, beating pig hides until they were soft and supple
(hog-flogger). Here occurred the-event that changed not
only Champert's life, but all of ours.
Next door to Champert's hog-floggery was a mooring
mast for dirigibles. In flew a dirigible one day, piloted by
a girl named 'Graffa von Zeppelin. Champert watched
Graffa descend from the dirigible, and his heart turned
over, and he knew love. Though Graffa's beauty was not
quite perfect-one of her legs was shorter than the other
(blimp-gimper)-she was nonetheless ravishing, what
with her tawny hair and her eyes of Lake Louise blue and
her marvelously articulated haunches. Champert, smitten,
ran quickly back to the hog-floggery to plan the wooing.
To begin with, naturally, he would give Graffa a pres-
ent. This presented problems, for hog-flogging, as we all
know, is a signally underpaid profession. Still, thought
Champert, if he had no money, there were two things he
did have: ingenuity and pigskin.
So he selected several high grade pelts and stitched
them together and blew air into them and made for Graffa
a perfectly darling little replica of a dirigible. "She will
love this," said he confidently to himself and proceeded to
make ready to call on Graffa.
First, of course, he shaved with Personna Super Stain-
less Steel Blades. And wouldn't you? If you were looking
to impress a girl, if you wanted jowls as smooth as ivory,
dewlaps like damask, a chin strokable, cheeks fondlesome,
upper lip kissable, would you not use the blade that
whisks away whiskers quickly and slickly, tuglessly and
nicklessly, scratchlessly and matchlessly? Would you not,
in short, choose Personna, available both in Injector style
and double-edge style? Of course you would.

1. What are you
doing, Al?
Lesson 1 in
"Tiptoeing Your
Way To The Top.*

3. Really?

2. What's this
all about?
Preparing for the
start of my
business career.
4. Sounds fascinating.
You should read
"Fun Things To Do
With Your First
Million:"

1kll

I've-learned an awful
lot from "Sidestepping
Middle Management and
Other Fancy Footwork."

NA,
ANC

I

ti

ToBOPJ4IT B9111,5311K

34
5. If you don't mind my saying so,
I think you'll save time and
effort by looking into the terrific
opportunities at Equitable.
The work is challenging, the pay
good, and there are plenty of
chances to move up fast.

..- .. " _ vzaac. j .

I-.

So Champert, his face a study in epidermal elegance,
rushed next door with his little pigskin dirigible. But
Graffa, alas, had run off, alas,, with a bush pilot who spe-
cialized in dropping limes to scurvy-ridden Eskimo vil-
lages (fruit-chuter).
Champert, enraged, started kicking his little pigskin
blimp all over the place. And who should walk by just
then but Jim Thorpe, Knute Rockne, Walter Camp, and
Pete Rozelled!
They walked silently, heads down. four disourac'pd

Language applicants must
take the Professional
Qualification Test (PQT) as a
prerequisite to NSA interviews

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