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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1967 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1967

THE MICHIG.AN DfAILY

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PAGE FIVIl

I

p
Gargoyle
By DALE MELCHER
Gargoyle now joins the distin-
guished ranks occupied by such
greats as Time, Newsweek, and Big
Ten Magazine by succumbing to
the lure of the hippie-pot-dissent
syndrome. In digging deep into the
Underground (occasionally stop-
ping at sewer level), Garg dredged
up psychedelic poetry, advice to
the busted, the Russian Revolu-
tion and Vietnam.
Consistency does not seem to be

oetry and prose
Sinks to Sewer Level

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G V 1ET ROCK
Nov. 27-30--8:30
5th Dimension
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one of Garg's strong points. This
installment runs the gamut from
bare-breasted broad to survival
notes for the drug-drenched jungle.
Steven Combes' instructive expose
of the Ann Arbor underground tells
it like it is-names the names.
Though probably the best written
piece in the issue, its bluntness hits
too close, rings too true to be real-
ly funny. Humor from Vietnam is
another misplaced collection-ob-
servations too true to laugh at.

On the lighter side is the inter-
view with J. Fred Oracle. a fre-
quently hilarious series of solutions
to national and domestic problems.
Tackling the three R's (Race, Reli-
gion, and Romney), J. Fred me-
thodically and effectively makes,
"profound and significant sense
out of the chaos of contemporary
politics." Unfortunately this is not
the tone setting article.
Notes From the Underground,
the supposed theme article, is a
dismal failure of grass roots sen-
timent. Haight-Ashbury may be
dying, but there's more going on
in Traverse City. Mich. than plant-
ing catalpa trees (I'll bet). I mean
the Underground is definitely
what's been happening, and flow-
er-power is certainly into the grass
roots, but canabis as the new cash
crop in Kansas???

iI

Jurlst Suggests Riots
Require Martial Law

UILD'
Tonight and Tomorrow
THE MAN ON
THE FLYING
TRAPEZE
Dir. Clyde Bruckman, 1935

I

By STEVE WILDSTROM
It might have been a better
idea to impose martial law during
last summer's riot in Detroit than
to attempt to process 7,000 cases
through normal criminal proced-
ures, Michigan Supreme Court Jus-
tice Theodore Souris said yester-
day.
Speaking at an Ann Arbor Legal
Aid Society meeting at the Law-
yers Club, Justice Souris said, "I
would hate to seemartial law im-
posed in this country during my
lifetime. But I think some of us
should start thinking seriously
about this as an alternative."
Martial Law
"I would like to ask," he con-
tinued, "if martial law would not
have been better than the judicial
procedures used during the riot."
Justice Souris said courtroom
procedures used, in which 750 to
800 {cases were processed by 13
Recorders' (criminal) Court judges
each day, left those arrested with
"an unfavorable impact of their
experiences on their attitudes to-
wards law and order." These un-
favorable attitudes towards the
legal process, he continued, would
be passed around to friends and
neighbors and "their effect will be
multiplied many times."
Souris, an associate justice, has
been on the Michigan Supreme
Court since 1960. He formerly was
a Wayne County Circuit judge.
Judicial Problems,
He said many of the judicial,
problems which arose during and
after the riot occured because "it;
was practically impossible for
judges and courtroom personnel
to function in what I consider to3
be a judicially proper manner."
Itgmight have been better, he
suggested, for the courts to simply,
inform the executive authorities,
that they could not handle theF
crush of cases presented by the
disorder. Under martial law, what
would ordinally be criminal of-
fenses are handled by militaryE
authorities.
Breakdowns in the administra-
tive and executive branches of1
government, Justice Souris said,!
were responsible for many of theI
problems encountered by thec
courts.
Riot Cases
During the first crush of riot
cases, he said, only three of 13
Recorders' Court courtrooms were
being used at any given time and
27 Circuit judges were idle because
all Circuit Court proceedings had
been suspended. Justice Souris
said, however, that police and
prosecutors office officials claimed
it was impossible to use the Cir-

cuit judges to help because they
did not have sufficient personnel
to find records, guard prisoners
and prosecute additional cases.
To guard against a recurrence
of what he called "a miscarriage
of justice" in the "possibility if
not probability" of further dis-
orders, Justice Souris proposed
several changes in the administra-
tion of the judicial process.
He said skilled personnel, such
as fingerprint experts and warrant
clerks, from all courts and depart-
ments should be mobilized imme-
diately to help process cases. Dur-
ing the riot, he said, it was some
time before warrant clerks from
Circuit Court and the police de-
partment, and state police and
FBI fingerprint experts were
brought innto help Recorders'
Court personnel.
Prisoner Detainment
He further suggested that provi-
sions be made in advance for de-
tainment of large numbers of pris-
oners. Last July, prisoners were
kept long periods in the garages
of police stations and in buses out-
side the County Jail. "One of the
most distressing occurences during
the riot . . . was the long deten-
tion of human beings in condi-
tions that were less than fit for
human beings," he said.
Justice Souris, along with Prof.
Yale Kamisar of the law school,
criticized a Recorders' Court deci-
sion to use court-appointed at-
torneys in place of a voluntary de-
fense system set up during the riot
by the Detroit Bar Association.
After a number of arraignments
had been completed, the court
decided to replace the voluntary
counsels with that they called
"skilled practitioners," Justice
Souris said.
"When this is done," he con-
tinued, "there are going to be more
decisions disposing of cases in an
expeditious manner."
Justice Souris commended a pro-
posal made by the Detroit Bar that
the present system of court-ap-
pointed attorneys for indigent de-
fendants be replaced by a so-
called private defender system.

So far okay, high points and low'starrin
ones, but gee fellas must you sink
so low? Elephant jokes already be- W. C. Fields!
long to the nostalgic past along
with bathroom humor. If you're "A riotous blend of
going to borrow or dig up old jokes eloquent pantomime,
at least be selective. There should inspired inanities, and
be more purpose to them then just unpredictable
filling up space-the advertise- eccentricities."
ments do that much more humor-
ously. 7:00 and 9:05
And then there's the six page
illustrated summary of Russian ARCHITECTURE
pre- and post-revolutionary poli-
tics in honor of the Fiftieth Anni-
versary of the October (or was it - STILL ONLY 50c-
November) Revolution.
To the staff I offer the sage ob-
servation of Louie Trifon, the Daily Classifieds
famous poet, "Clarenceblew his
mind/He finally blew his mind/ Bring Quick Results
He went clear out of his banana.

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k TA1:

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JEWS as a recognized national minority in the Soviet Union are allowed
none of the typical cultural institutions guaranteed every other minority.
---no books, no schools, no theatre, no
newspapers ... in the Yiddish language.
They are the only religious community forbidden to have any contact, re-
lations, or ties with co-religionists abroad. Neither have they a national
body-unlike all other ethnic or religious communities.
They may not manufacture Jewish religious articles:
-no prayerbooks, prayer shawls, phylacteries, and
for the greatest part, no matzot.
10,000 Hebrew prayerbooks were promised by the government
-none was printed
For its population of close to 3,000,000, only 97 synagogues were in ex-
istence in 1966. All the rest-many thousands-- were shut down or con-
fiscated. Moscow, with half a million Jews has one synagogue.
Kosygin promised permission to Jews who wished to reunite with families,
especially in Israel.
-virtually none has received this permission.
The press teems with anti-Jewish stereotypes.
Since the Arab-Israeli War, Jews are vilified and assaulted as being friends,
if not agents-of the "imperialist" State of Israel.

^i 'iC

your
college
let ters

IMPORTED
BRIAR

Do the

VIET ROCK
Nov. 27-30-8:30

NOW AT YOUR LOCAL STORE $495 AND 59
"GIVE ME A RIDDLE"

5th Dimension

A Film by DAVID SCH ICKLE

Ti9At et THE ARK

8:30 P.M.

1421 Hill Street

IMAGES OF THE U.S.A.
Three Dramatic Profiles
"Was the unknown soldier a nigger, a mick,
a kike, a wop, or a wasp?" (50c Cover)

CONFRONTATION IN NIGERIA
"That my Nigerian friends trust one is no reason
for them to trust Washington or forgive Birm--
ingham; but something is there which was not
there before and which the world is the better
for having."
Thurs. & Fri., Nov. 16 & 17-4:15 P.M.
Room 1025 Angell Hall

Peter M.

Bauland

ATID
ISRAEL STUDENTS

Mitchell

# 0Q
/iA/el
ORGAN IZATION

Joseph Ben-Dak
Josef Blatt

Sheridan D.

Lazarus

Blau

FRIDAY & SATURDAY
MICHAEL COONEY
doing songs of all shapes and sizes from blues to children's songs,
traditional ballads to topical songs, playing banjo, 6 & 12 string
guitars, harmonica, penny whistle, uke, and kazoo.
($1.50 Cover--or $1.00 after 10:30 P.M.)

Sponsored by the PEACE CORPS

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GUILD HOUSE

RICHIE HA VENS

802 Monroe

is not

present
INSTITUTE ON SOVIET JEWRY
NOVEMBER 17 to 19
Friday at 7:15 P.M. Sabbath Service
ONEG SHABBAT
FILM: "THE PRICE OF SILENCE"
distributed by the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations
PANEL:
DR. HERBERT PAPER, moderator
Chairman, Dept. of Linguistics
DR. WILLIAM BALLIS
Professor of Political Science
DR. WILLIAM ROSENBERG
Assistant Professor, History
DR. ZE'EV KOREN
University Medical School
Saturday: Seminars to be Announced
Sunday at 5:30 Deli House
Dramatization of Eli Wiesel's
THE JEWS OF SILENCE
oAfi rert M y L nSo lin,

Gerald Brody
Charles M. Butter
H. D. Cameron
Kenneth Case
Philip J. Elving
Marvin Felheim
Sidney Fine
Morris Foster
Frank Grace
Otto Graf
Robert A. Green
Morris Greenhut
Alexander Guiora
William Haber
Paul Ilie
Herman Jacobs
Ruben Kahn
Abraham Kaplan
H. C. Kelman
Rnlnh Klpinman

Ronald A.

Rosen

Bruce Levenberg
Harold Levinson
Lionel Lieberman
Eugene Litwak
A. P. Mendel
W. H. Miller
Herbert H. Paper
Clarence Pott.
Joseph A. Reif

FRIDAY, NOV. 17

NOON LUNCHEON 25c
PETER DiLORENZI:
"MAXIMALISM, VIOLENCE, &
THE NEW LEFT"

WINNIE the POOH
but his songs, guitar, and sitar
Will Blow Your MIND!

Rudolf B. Schmerl
David Schteingart
Melvin L. Seizer
Keeve M. Siegel
Lewis Siegel
Ronald Tikofsky
Joseph Ullman
Frederick
Wagman
Herschel Weil
Rabbi Harold
White

FRIDAY, 3-5 P.M.

"BUBBLY!"-L. Walk

THREE gigantic NITES!!

"THE PEACE CORPS WORLD"
See exhibit, talk with Peace Corp returnee,

M--- -& On

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Door ooens at 8:UU tridav. saturdav. sundav

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