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November 11, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-11

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Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TWO HE MCHI~A1~flALY QA ~f~y!~F~ ~T ~ ....

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music
Fiedler Displays Familiar 'Pop' Formula

Victorious 'U' Debaters
To Host Weekend Meet

By JAMES SVEJDA
Try as he may, any one fortu-
nate enough to have heard Arthur
Fiedler and his Bostonians during
the "Pops" season is unlikely to
forget the experience. The Boston
Pops (essentially the Boston Sym-
phony minus its first-desk men)
competes with a din of popping
corks, breaking bottles and swizzle
sticks (they serve the stuff on the
premises) and an exuberantly vo-

cal audience that gobbles up Fied-
ler, musicians, the George M. Co-
han medleys and the latest folk-
rock hits.
But make no mistake about it:
the incredible success that Fiedler
has enjoyed for thirty-odd years
doesn't rest entirely on his un-
canny ability to "give the slobs
what they want"; he does, of
course, but there's more to it than
that.

When things get a little soupy
at times it comes as no surprise,
since unrepentent sentimentality is
an integral part of the "Pops"
formula. What does surprise many
people is that despite the "slob-
oriented" programming and the
informality, the typical Fiedler
performance is usually well
thought-out, disciplined and al-
ways enthusiastic.
At last night's concert with the

Carawan Presents Artful Act
I nTraditional Folk Repertoire

Yomiuri Japanese Symphony Or-
chestra, Fiedler conducted this
virile, polished orchestra with his
accustomed zest and flare for
showmanship.
Fiedler's "Semiramide" was pre-
cise, strickly no-nonsense, and per-
haps even a bit on the reversed
side. Despite a slightly metallic
woodwind sound, the orchestra was
fine, especially that wonderfully
rich horn quartet in the introduc-
tion.
Miss Hiro Imamura was piano
soloist in the Chopin Concerts No.
2 in F minor. I can only say that
I am looking forward to future
samplings of her enormous talent.
Her Chopin compares favorably
with any that I have heard, it was
big and dreamy and yet had an
incredibly sharp focus on detail
("impressionistic," if you will)-
in short, this was a beautiful per-
formance. Fiedler was excellent
here, clearly aware from the be-
ginning that it was all Miss Ima-
mura's show.
After a zippy and tastefully wry
"Classical Symphony" which, in-
cidently, is no joke to play, things
moved into Popland where Fiedler
is supreme.
"Gaiete Parisienne" ended it-
with a characteristic bang. Shucks,
who am I kidding? Around about
the Polka there I was, tapping my
foot with a silly grin on my face
like everybody else.
Fiedler's performance? As Casey
Stengel used to say, "he done
splendid."

By SHARON FITZHENRY
The University Debate Team is
riding on the waves of victory with
increasing frequency this year,
winning two meets in as many
weeks
This weekend they hope to ex-
tend their streak as they play host
to 30 universities and colleges.
Two weeks ago, the team
triumphed over Goshen College in
Indiana and last weekend at the
University of Chicago's National
Debate Tournament, they defeated
the University of Illinois, Ford-
ham, Oberlin College and eight
other schools to return home with
the first prize.
Lee Hess, '69, and Larry Rogers,
'69, were the members of the win-
ning two-man team in this meet
and in addition, two other Mich-
igan debaters received best speak-
ers awards.

Each year, a single national issue
is assigned to high school and
college teams all over the country.
The topic this year: Resolved that
congress shall establish a guaran-
teed annaul cash income for all
citizens is one that the Michigan
debaters, many of whom are law
and political science majors, find
especially workable, said faculty
advisor (Director of Forensics) C.
William Colburn.
The debating squad consists of,
24 members both in the novice and
varsity classes (novices are first
year university debaters), and is
captained by Lee Hess.
The team's schedule for the rest
of the semester includes meets
with Bradley College, University of
Illinois and a Thanksgiving In-
vitational tournament at George-
town University in Washington,
D.C.

November 9, 1967
DAILY OFFICIAL Apfrov: That the Undergraduate
DAILY O FICIAL Anthrlov Comimtte be recognized
as a student organization.
U3U'TNN I Approved: Thait the Philosophy Club
ElbUJ.. ~ ~Il (undergraduate) be recognized as a
......~.......student organization.
Appointed: Kathryn Bolton to the
The Daily Official Bulletin is av Committee to Study the Bureau of Ap-
official publication of the Univt'r- ;poinltmenfts.
sity of Michigan for which The Approved: That SGC authorike Bruce
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- Kahn. Michael Davis, Leslie Mahler.
alresponsibility. Notices should be Marty Lieberman and Sam Sherman
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to to negotiate with the Regents and*
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- their administrative officers on the
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding incorporation of SGC.
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday Approved: That the Student Vehicle
for Saturday and Sunday. General Regulations (1967-68) be abolished with
Notices may be published a maxi- the following exceptions:
mum of two times on request; Day Sec. 5. Dates Effective: These regula-
Calendar items appear once only, tions are in effect for the entire year
Student organization notices are not unless stated other wise in these regu-
accepted for publication. For more lations or in the "Daily Official Bul-
information call 74-9270. letin."4
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 See. 22. Parking Bicycles: Bicycles on
University property shall be parked
Sonly inbicycle rackssor other clearly
General NOt-,- designated bicycle parking areas. All
5UI~EW.A~ ~bicycles parked or stored on University
The Canterbury Tales-"Franklin's property must be locked.
Tale," Sunday, November 12, WWJ-TV, Sec. 23. Storage of Bicycles: Bicycles
Channel 4, 12:00 noon. may not be stored in non-residential
racks on University property over
Senate Assembly Meeting, Monday, sev'enty-two (72) hours unless permis-0
November 13, 6050 Institute for Social sion is obtained from the Student Ve-
Research, 3:15 p.m. hicle Bureau.
Main Topics See. 25. Discipline--Bicycles: The
Recommendation of the Committee of Univer~sity is hereby authorized to im-
the Whole to the Assembly regarding pose fines not to exceed five dollars
Committee Organization and Procedures. ($5) for each offense or to impound
A Report to SACUA on the SC any bicycle in violation of these regu-
Action Amending the booklet "Univer-lations, and to impose reasonable im-
sity Regulations". poundment fees and storage charges.
Research on Classified Projects at Impounded bicycles shall be subject to
The University of Michigan-astate- auction by the University if unclaimed
ment by the Senate Assembly Commit- within ninety (90) days after unm-
tee on Research Policies, poundment.
Summary of action taken by Student
Government Council at its meeting (Continued on Page 8)

By ROBERT FRANKE
Guy Carawan is appearing this
weekend at the Canterbury House,
singing folk songs and playing 6
and 12-string guitar, banjo and
recorder.
That's a pretty straightforward
way of putting it. Writing about
the man as performer is much
more difficult than writing about
his work as a folk music collector
("Michael Row the Boat Ashore,
from the Georgia Sea Islands), as
a song writer he wrote the music
for "We Shall Overcome") or as
a private anti-poverty andcivil
rights worker in the South.
Not that he is a bad performer;
he isn't. He presents his audience
with a pleasant evening in a quiet,
graceful manner. But his style is
one that hasn't been seen around
Ann Arbor for a few years now.
Because it is in many ways un-
expected, it requires some . de-
scription.
Almost all of Mr. Carawan's
material is traditional. His reper-
toire ranges over the entire spec-
trum of folk music, from mountain
ballads to spirituals, and includes
a few written pieces that have
been classified in the last few
years a folk music, and have per-
haps become folk music, such as
McCarthy
H'fits Policies
In Vietnlam
(Continued from Page 1)
President" committee. Harrison
said that a group of Democrats
have agreed to lead the com-
mittee.
A source close to McCarthy in-
dicated that the senator would not
discourage the idea.
At a press conference earlier
at Detroit Metropolitan airport,'
McCarthy denied reports that he
his decided to oppose President
Johnson in the first four presi-1
dential primaries next year. "My;
decision will come in about three
weeks," he said.
McCarthy said he views his
present role as a serious move in3
opposition to the President's pol-f
icy in Vietnam. "We have seen_
{our present policies fail and we
now must examine the possibilities
of de-escalation and a more
-limited war or a compromise."
Such a compromise, he added,
may include "talking about par-
ticipation of the Communists in
government.
Asked if he would support a
Republican peace candidate if
Johnson is renominated, McCarthy
said, "There won't be a Republi-
can peace candidate. It would be
impossible to have a Republican
representing a responsible alter-
native."
NOW SHOWING
STOP WORRYINGI
is6oN THE WAYjI
"HELP! I'm
kidnapped"
DELP!Yi
ost on a f" ;F
tropic island"
1111L"HELP 1''
." by women" '

Woody Guthrie's children's songs
and his, own "Ain't You Got a
Right to the Tree of Life".
His approach to this material is
straightforward and subtle. He
sings in a soft tenor voice and
guitar in a uniformly skill-
ful fingerpicking style. His banjo
playing is what a Southern f arm-
er might call pretty, and his
recorder solo as he sang "Pretty
Saro" was what I would call beau-
tiful. His entire instrumental per-
formance is not a thing in itself,
but an honest accompaniment.
And this is an essential charac-
teristic of his performing style.
Rather than presenting Guy Cara-
wan the performer, he presents
the tradition itself as he has ex-
perienced it. He likes to involve

his audience in the songs by ask-
ing it to sing along on many of
them; once he does this, he in a
sense joins the audience himself,
appreciating the music with them.
The result is an evening that is
nonetheless vital 'for not being
turned on-as vital as the tradi-
tion itself; no more, no less.
The audience comes to the Can-
terbury House expecting to -be
entertained by Guy Carawan and
finds itself being entertained by
American folk music. It's a little
disorienting, and perhaps for
those people, who have come to
expect high-power personality en-
tertainment from the Canterbury
House, a little too, disorienting.
But for those who simply like folk
music, it's an enjoyable experience.

''To Survey Antarctica
The first infrared survey ever in conventional photography. In-
conducted on the Antarctic Con- terpretation of infrared images
tinent is about to begin. requires a trained observer.
A five-man University research For example, an infrared image
team is leaving today for Mc- of an ice-cap appears as shades
Murdo, the main U.S. antarctic of gray, the relatively warmer
station. areas appearing a light gray and
Using an infrared scanning de- the colder areas almost black.
vice aboard a Navy C-121 airplane, Thus, a light area reveals the
the eserchrs ill urvy aeaslocation of relatively thin ice. The
the researchers will survey areas jgroup leaving Saturday is headed
of Ross Island, the huge Ross Ice gypDangCSar ariseaded
Shelf, and Victorialand. The sur- by Dana C. Parker, a research
vey sites are on or near the geological engineer at the Univer-
antarctic coast, due south of New sity's Institute of Science and
Zealand. Technology. An earlier IST group,
including Parker, went to the arc-
Infrared imagery is the taking tic in 1960 to make the first
of pictures by means of heat infrared survey ever conducted
waves, not visible light waves as there.
TONIGHT at

GUY CARAWAN
TONIGHT!
(Sunday too!)

Many Hospitals Allow Abortions
Despite Questionable Legality

8 P.M.-$1.50
after 2nd Set-$1 .00
-free goodies
-tables
-chairs
-and thou

A University survey has report-
ed that a vast number of. teach-
ing hospitals in the United States
and in Canada permit abortions,
many of them in violation of
state law.
Of 231 hospitals with residency
training programs in obstetrics
and gynecology which replied to
a 15-page questionnaire, 194 said
they permitted abortions.
The 35 Roman Catholic hos-
pitals replying said they permitted
no abortions, and two non-Cath-
olic hospitals also said they did
not, allow abortions, even for
medical reasons.
Planning Center
Dr. John W. Eliot of the Center
for Population Planning sent out
500 questionnaires for the survey.
The findings were confirmed by
one of his associates at the plan-
ning center.
The names of the hospitals and
the number of apparently illegal
abortions they permitted, although
reportedly listed in the final
study, were not revealed.
Of the non-Catholic hospitals
responding, 175 reported they
allowed abortions for psychiatric

reasons; 149 for obstetric and
gynecologic reasons; 155 in cases
in which mothers have German
measles during the first three
months of pregnancy; 125 when
genetic defects in the infant seem
likely; 65 in pregnancies resulting
from rape or incest.
Cases of Stress
Twelve of the responding hos-
pitals reported allowing abortions
in c a s e s of "socio-economic
stress," the report said.
"It will be noted," Eliot wrote,
"that the first three indications-
medical, psychiatric and obstetric
-are possibly legal if the phy-
sician believes that the woman's
life is threatened if the operation
is not performed.
"The last three indications are
clearly not legal."
A Michigan Bar Association
proposal for liberalized abortion
law follows a model bill suggest-
ed by the American Law Associa-
tion.-Similar laws have been ap-
proved in three states: Colorado,
North Carolina and California.
The laws allow abortions to
preserve the physical or mental
health of the mother, in cases of

rape or incest and when there is
a significant chance of birth
defect.
Most other states allow abor-
tions only in cases in which the
mother's life is in danger. Four
states-Louisiana, Massachusetts,
New Jersey and Pennsylvania -
have laws on the books prohibit-
ing abortion in any case.
Current Michigan law allows
abortion only when the life of
the mother is in danger.
Phone 482-2056
Enitawe On CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
FREE HEATERS
Chiller of
Ethe year!
With DANA ANDREWS
PLMo s ste

8:30 P.M.

1421. Hill Street

The West African Group
(with Fobi, Solomon, Horacio, Chief Koko & others)
doing typical African music-including the
TALKING DRUMS, xylophone, and folk music.
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments

". ..doing the'most creative and important field
work in the South today."
Alan Lomax
P]LJWillBUNRY iOUS

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IVAN THE
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PART I11(1946)
Czar Ivan's arowina

Mon.-Fri.: "POINT" 7:00-10:25; "NAKED" 8:40
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