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November 09, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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,...I H E M C H G N A L

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tip.

Super Saturn Blasts Off Today WILL "°T, ,T"°RAw:
In Historic Prelude to Moonshot Eban Rejects

4

Indian Proposal

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. {A-'}-
Space officials yesterday declared
America's first Saturn 5 super
rocket "ready to go" on its his-
toric first flight this morning,
despite minor hardware problems
and a warning that winds may be
too gustry.
The 363-foot-tall monster boos-
ter, first flight version of the type
rocket which is to hurl three as-
tronauts to the moon in 1969,
aimed toward a 7 a.m., EST, liftoff
to begin a mission described yes-
terday as "perhaps the most diffi-
cult step we'll encounter" between

now and the day astronauts fly to I Causing less worry were minor

For UN Ml* dmEast Settlement

the lunar surface.
"This mission is ready to go,"
said Maj. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips,
director of NASA's apollo program
office.
A disquieting prediction from
the weatherman that winds may
be gusty at launch time was caus-
ing concern, however, Phillips said.
The forecast called for winds of
21 miles an hour with gusts up to
29 miles an hour. Mission rules
won't permit a launch when peak
gusts are stronger than 32 miles
per hour.

THE NEW

AORALITY
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU?
COME AND HEAR A PROBING LECTURE
BY LENORE D. HANKS C.S.B.
OF PORTLAND, OREGON

I
"NEW STYLES IN LEFTISM"
"The great value of the present rebel-
liousness is that it requires a personal de-
cision, not merely as to what one shall do
but .also as to what one shall be."
*from Steady Work by
IR.VING HOWE
t
Writer-in-Residence '68
UNIQUIE'
TWI ELRY
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hardware problems, including a
' battery that had to be replaced
on the rocket's second stage and
a switching problem with a tele-
vision system monitoring the
launch vehicle. Phillips said he was
confident these troubles could be
overcome in time to launch today.
An unscheduled "hold" in the
countdown was called yesterday
afternoon when technicians got
c slightly behind their work sched-
ule, but NASA said no major prob-
lems were present. The time could
be made up later in the countdown
to still achieve a 7 a.m. liftoff.
The first unmanned launch of
the Saturn 5 represents "one of
' the critical steps in man's going
to the moon," said Dr. George
E. Mueller, NASA associate ad-
ministrator for manned space
I flight, "and perhaps is the most
difficult step we'll encounter."
While millions of Americans
watch on home television screens,
the six-million-pound rocket is
to thunder away from Cape Ken-
nedy to propel an unmanned Apol-
lo moonship into orbit 11,400 miles
over the earth.
It involves the first flight test
of the Saturn 5's first and second
stages; the first restart of the
rocket's third stage, which pre-
viously was flight-qualified on
smaller Saturn 1 boosters, and the
first operational use of America's
man-to-the-moon launch complex.
"The first launch of any new
and untested rocket is the acid
test," observed Dr. Werhner Von
Braun, director of NASA's Mar-
shall Space Flight Center at
Huntsville, Ala.
After reaching its 11,400-mile
peak altitude, a spacecraft motor
is to send the moonship in a fiery
plunge through earth's atmosphere
-generating speeds of 25,000 miles
and heat of 4,500 degrees to test
the Apollo heat shield at re-entry
conditions astronauts must en-
counter returning from the moon.
Recovery will be attempted at
the splashdown zone, located
about 600 miles north of Hawaii.
The mission, officially designat-
ed Apollo 4, "will tell us two es-
sential things-it will validate, the
Saturn 5 launch vehicle and as-
sure that the heat shield has been
11 adequately designed," said Phillips.

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (A)-Is- i The Security Council is sched-
raeli Foreign Minister Abba Eban ' uled to meet at 3:30 p.m. today at
flatly rejected yesterday an In- Egypt's request to debate the Mid-
i than resolution aimed at promoting dle East sutiation after several
a Middle East settlement through ; weeks of intensive but fruitless
the UN Security Council. negotiations for a settlement.
He also expressed reservations In Cairo, a government spokes-
about a plan introduced in the than told newsmen that Israeli
council by the United States, and withdrawal from the captured

East European sources said they
j thought the Soviet Union would
veto the U.S. proposal if it ap-
peared likely to obtain enough
;votes to pass.
' i Will Not Withdraw
j Eban told a news conference
that Israel "cannot in any circum-
stances give any consent,, support
or cooperation" to the Indian plan,
which calls for the withdrawal of
Israeli armed forces from "all the
territories" seized in the Arab-Is-
raeli war in June.
Asked if this meant Israel would
refuse to cooperate with a special
UN representative to work out a
settlement under this resolution,
he replied he had no quarrel with
j this interpretation.

.avaawa wrr wa as vaa wav vwt+vuavu
Arab territory was an essential
first step to any Middle East set-
tlement. He urged the council to
show the world that "aggression
does not pay."
Irrational' Arab View
Asked about this frequently
stated Arab view, Eban said it
was "so irrational that it is amaz-
ing even to see it imposed."
Eban said the Indian draft res-
olution, which is co-sponsored by
Mali and Nigeria, prejudices Is-
rael's position in advance by de-
fining what shape a settlement
should take.
He reiterated Israel's contention
that there would be no return to
Armistice demarcation lines that

existed before the war. These, he
said, "must be superseded by an
agreed and secure permanent fron-
tier."
The U.S. resolution calls for
"withdrawal of armed forces from
occupied teritory," not specifying
which armed forces nor stating
that all Arab territory should be
evacuated.
Eban repeated in the strongest
terms Israel's demands for direct
negotiations with the Arab nations
as the only course to peace.
The Arab refusal to negotiate
peace with Israel, he said, was "an
unprecedented act of extremism."
Arabs Blaimed
Asked how long Israel was pre-
pared to' wait for direct talks with
the Arabs, he replied that "if the
Arabs are not prepared to talk, it
is they, in effect, that want to
perpetuate the situation."
His criticism of the U.S. reso-
lution was centered on its failure
to give t proper emphasis to the
need for direct negotiations. But
he said neither plan before the
council took adequate notice of
f this need.
Eban also was critical of a Jap-
anese working , paper being cir-
culated among members of the
25-nation council. Like the In-
dian resolution, he said; it also
prejudices Israel's position on the
territorial question in its formula-
tion of the withdrawal provision.
The Japanese plan has not been
formally introduced.
Egypt Requests Session
Egyptian Ambassador Mohamed
' A. El-Kong submitted the request
Tuesday that the council meet to
"consider the dangerous situation
prevailing in the Middle East" as
a result of the Israeli refusal to
withdraw,
Egyptian sources indicated For-
eign Minister Mahmoud Riad
would present Egypt's case in the
council. Eban said he would speak
for Israel.
A U.S. spokesman said his dele-
gation expected the council to
meet publicly for two or three days
and then adjourn for consulta-,
tations.

UGL's Reserve System,*
Automation Triumphant

A

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13
IN THE UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM

8 P.M.

SPONSORED BY THE CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
EVERYONE IS WELCOME-ADMISSION FREE

(Continued from Page I)
Some proposals have been made
by students toward improving the
efficiency of the automated closed
reserved system. The most ob-
vious and most popular concerns
the staffing of helpers behind
the desk. Students feel that if
there were more helpers behind
the desk during rush (or peak)
periods, then there would be less
of a jam-up. According to Miss
Faucher, studies are being made
to determine when a larger staff
is needed; however, it is impos-
sible to hire people for short
periods of time to absorb the rush
of students at the desk which oc-
curs at the begining of every
hour.
Another solution proposed by
students is to make up a list of

those books and periodicals which
are not available at a given mo-
ment. This will enable students
to avoid waiting in line just to
find out that all the copies of a
book or article they need are being
used.
,The way this system could be'
made operational would be to
make a set of cards, one for each
book or article; then, when the
last copy of a particular book is
taken, the worker can take the
card and place it on a board
where students can see it. Then,
when a copy is returned, the
card may be removed from the
list.
But, the whole issue can be
foced philosophically. One blonde
says her only concern with the
system is that she feels "aw-
fwly sorry for the computer"

I

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FROM

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