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November 09, 1967 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-09

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HREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TH

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TI fREE

::.

GOP

Expands

in

States;

LOCALS STILL STRIKING:
UAW Negotiates Three-Year
Tentative Pact with Chrysler

I

Democrats

Hold Big Cities

-Associated Press
CLEVELAND MAYOR-ELECT Carl B. Stokes (center), shakes hands with his defeated opponent
Seth C. Taft (right), and smiles at incumbent Mayor Ralph S. Locher.
4 "_
Elections Produce Enthusiastic
Response from Nero Leaders'

WASHINGTON (R) - Republi-
cans firmed up their base for the
1968 presidential contest by cap-
turing the Kentucky State House
in Tuesday's elections, but Demo-
crats were cheered by retaining
their holds on the big cities of
Philadelphia and Cleveland.
Democrat Carl B. Stokes, a
Negro, demonstrated by his elec-
tion as mayor of Cleveland that
it is possible for one of his race
to take the top office in a major
city even where Negroes are a
minority.
He takes a place in history as
the first Negro to accomplish
that.
The 40-year-old lawyer could
be one of the big guns of 1968
Democratic campaigning, parti-
cularly in areas with a large Ne-
gro vote.
Mayor James I. Tate's reelec-
tion in Philaedlphia is another
important one for the Democrats.
The patronage and power that go
with the mayor's office can be
decisive in a close statewide elec-
tion.
Vietnam Referendums
For President Johnson, who
presumably will seek another
term in the White House in next
year's election, it was heartening
that San Francisco decisively
turned down a ballot proposition
for U.S. withdrawal from Viet-
nam.
The referendum vote was 2 to
1 against a pullout.
A Vietnam vote was also on the
ballot in Cambridge, Mass., but
the result may not be known for
three weeks.
On the other side of the Viet-
nam question, there was the fac-
tor that Louis B. Nunn, success-
ful GOP candidate for governor
of Kentucky, had made it an issue
in his campaign.
"Tired of the War?" one of his
slogans asked. "Vote Nunn."
In other city contests which
attracted particular national at-
tention, Richard G. Hatcher, Ne-
gro Democrat, was elected mayor
,of Gary, Ind., and Kevin White
won in Boston over Mrs. Louise
Day Hicks, foe of busing Negro
children to white schools.
In Gary, where the outcome
teetered. uncertainly thro u g
much of the night, Hatcher was
certified yesterday by the Lake
County Election Board as the
winner by 1,389 votes in the city
of 180,000 population.
But Republican Joseph Radi-
gan, a white businessman, kept
open the possibility of a court
challenge.
Democrat segregationist John
Bell Williams ,was elected gover-
nor of Mississippi by a whopping
majority.
Looking to 1968, Nunn's elec-
tion as governor of Kentucky

means that when he takes office
next year the Republicans will
hold a majority of 50 governor-
ships for the first time since 1954.
The division by parties will
shift from the present 25-25 to ,
26-24 for the GOP.
Those 26 Republican states will
have a total of 304 electoral votes,
34 more than needed to name a
president.
Aside from the Kentucky vic-
tory, GOP National Chairman Ray
C. Bliss pointed to the elections
for the New Jersey legislature as:

DETROIT (0) - The United
Auto Workers and Chrysler Corp.
reached tentative agreement on
a new three-year contract covering
95,000 hourly rated workers last
night.
The agreement came only hours
before a midnight strike dead-
line, but too late to avert wide-
spread local walkouts that crip-
ples the company's production.
The UAW announced te
agreement after a 34-hour bar-

San Franciscans Defeat
Antiwar Proposition 2=1,

gaining session in telegrams to
local presidents.
It said talks were being broken
off without agreement on a con-
tract covering 8,000 salaried
workers because bargainers were
"to exhausted to go on.
A new dealine was set for local
at-the-plant agreements, but the
union did not immediately dis-
close when it would be.
The tentative contract was al-
most identical to the record in-

evidence his party is still on the
upsurge demonstrated in the 1966 SAN FRANCISCO ( -This
elections. Republicans took con- first major city in the nation to
trol of both houses of the legisla- vote on Vietnam policy smashed
ture from the Democrats. down by a nearly 2 to 1 margin
Tuesday the idea of a ceasefire
'Very Significant' and immediate withdrawal.
Bliss said the campaigning in The vote was 132,402 NO and
New Jersey was on the national 76,632 YES by citizens of an area
issue of "Why Wait Until '68" where there have been several
and called the results very sig- massive antiwar demonstrations
nificant. -the most recent an October at-
Cleveland Republicans had put , tempt to force a shutdown of the
up a highly attractive candidate Army Induction Center in Oak-
in Seth Taft, 44, a liberal and land.
active in civic activities. Attorney Joseph Alioto, the
Gary is even more overwhelm- fisherman's son who won out
ingly Democratic under normal Tuesday as mayor, shouted "good"
conditions but plainly a white- over the outcome of Proposition
Negro contest developed there. P, the Vietnam issue.
BELKIN PRODUCTIONS PRESENT
SUN.NOV. 19- 7:3 P. m.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
ALL SEATS RESERVED: $2.50-$3.50-$4.50-$5.50
ON SALE NOW: All J. L. Hudson Ticket Centers,
Downtown, Northland, Eastland, Westland; all met-
ropolitan Grinnell stores and Masonic Auditorium.
MAIL ORDERS: Send stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope to Masonic Auditorium, 500 Temple, Detroit,
Mich. 48201.

In Washington, congressional
supporters of President Johnson's
Vietnam policy hailed the result
as a victory. But advocates of de-
escalation termed the result
meaningless.
Gov Ronald Reagan, a Repub-
lican who recently has attacked
what he describes as the Johnson
administration's "credibility gap"
on the war, opposed Proposition
P. He said "I don't believe cities
should have foreign policies."
"When President Johnson sees
these results, he's going to be
shaken," John Richard Moran,
coordinator for the Peace and
Freedom Party, told 350 persons
at a post-election rally.

dustry pact won at Ford Motor
Co. through a 46-day strike that
ended two weeks ago, but in-
cluded one major benefit not
gained there - wage parity for
Canadian workers.
The company said Canadian
workers, now some 40 cents an
hour behind their American coun-
terparts, would draw even with
the U.S. workers over the three-
year life of the pact.
The Ford pact gave some 160,000
auto workers at that company
wage and benefit increase over
three years of roughly $1 an hour
over the current scale of $4.70.
That pact was valued at 6 per
cent. With wage parity the Chry-
sler pact likely will be somewhat
higher - there are 12,000 Chry-
sler workers in Canada - but
neither side placed an estimate
on it.
Sudden suspension of the talks
left several questions unanswered
as bargainers hastened home for
'sleep before a scheduled return
to the table Thursday.
With the status of salaried
workers still up in the air there
was n6 way to gauge the impact
on Thursday's production.
Car output was reduced to 36
per cent and truck production
cut to zero Wednesday as work-
ers in four states jumped the
gun on the midnight strike dead-
line.

THIS WEEKEND

NEW YORK (P) - The broad
victories, some of them historic,
won by Negroes in Tuesday's elec-
tion brought uniform - smiles to
the faces of moderate and mili-
tant Negro leaders yesterday,
along with cautious predictions
that a trend to disregard color
may have begun.
Few were as enthusiastic as
A. W. Willis, defeated in last sum-
mer's primary election as a can-
didate for mayor of Memphis,
Tenn.
"We're going to see the elec-
tion of more and more Negroes
... acceptance by the white com-
munity of responsible Negro of-
ficeholders will become. more and
more a normal happening," Willis
said.
Elect Negro Mayors
"The election of Negro mayors
in Cleveland, Ohio, and Gary,
Ind., signifies a stunning defeat
for black militants who argue
that gains can't be won by the
ballot," said Sen. Edward W.
Brooke (R-Mass.), himself the
first Negro elected to the Senate
since Reconstruction. ". . . It
shows the American Negrohe can
achieve through lawful means,"
Brooke said.
But he warned that "the hun-
gry, those with no jobs, those liv-
ing in deplorable conditions are
going to take little hope from the
elections in Gary and Cleveland."
'Living Proof'
Whitney M. Young Jr., direc-
tor of the National Urban League,
said Democrat Carl B. Stokes'
successful battle in Cleveland,
and the narrow election of Demo-
crat Richard G. Hatcher in Gary,
are "living proof of what polit-
ical organization and wise use of
the ballot can do to benefit any
group."
STARTS SATURDAY
STOP WORRYINGI
HELPI
I$SON THE WAYI
"HEC!I 'm
H PHELP! I'm
lostonla
tropic island!
HELPI'm Y
i'~ q~Iyrn

Those victories plus the defeat
in Boston of Louise Day Hicks, an
opponent of busing to provide ra-
cial balance in public schools,
show, Young said, "that while the
backlash is there, it is not as pow-
erful as the demagogues would
have us believe."
In addition to those and. other
Northern victories, Negroes were
elected for the first time since

Reconstruction to the state legis-
latures of Virginia and possibly
Mississippi.
Six Negroes captured county
supervisor, constable and justice
of the peace posts in Mississippi,
bringing to 24 the number of Ne-
gro officeholders in that state,
while James M. Bradby defeated
a white incumbent who had held
the post of sheriff in Charles
City County, Va., for 43 years.

Y CARAWAN
"Guy goes effortlessly to the heart of the song and
performs it . .. as it was made to be sung .. doing
the most creative field work in the South today."
-Alan Lomax
"Many thanks for your inspirational songs."
-Rev. Martin Luther King
at the
330 MAYNARD
Fri., Sat., Sun. 8 p.m. $1.50, after 2nd set-$1.00
FREE EATS

State Picks New Mayors;
Hubbard Wains 13th Term

By The Associated Press
Orville L. Hubbard, Dearborn's
mayor since 1941, got support
from 87 per cent of those voting
in the Detroit suburb Tuesday as
he was elected to his 13th con-
secutive term.
Hubbard defeated challenger
Charles J. Nemeth; 26;454 to
3,937.
Hubbard's third oldest son,
John Jay Hubbard, was successful
in his 'first bid to be elected to
the Dearborn City Council.
'In other elections in Michigan:
Jackson voters defeated incum-

bent Mayor Mary Bennett. They
elected Maurice "Bud" Townsend
Jr., 5,852 to 3,769. The incumbent
favored a city income tax and a
fulltime mayor. Townsend op-
posed both.
Grosse Pointe Mayor David
Burgess, who was unopposed, poll-
ed 1,013 votes in a light turnout.
Kalamazoo elected a new may-
or and four new City Commission
members. Of three incumbents
returned to office, Paul Schrier,
60, was elected mayor as the top
vote-getter with 10.103.

III

COMING!

Seats Now!

I

"HELP!
j4citcen!
The Colorful Adventures of
rTHE BEAThES
aremore UoG than eer.In C(LORI
{ EASTMANCOLOI A UNITED ARTISTS
SHOW TIMES:
SAT. 7-9-11 SUN 7-9
MON. 7-9 TUES. 7-9
I~.

BY ASTRIKING AND ORIGINAL TRAGI-COMEDY
S~TUSTR E

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