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November 05, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-05

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

SU=NDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1967

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5,1967

HUAC Losing Former Power

C7

Associated Press News Analysis
WASHINGTON (P)-The once-
powerful House Committee on Un-
American Activities appears to be
going into eclipse.
It has approved three bills this
year, all with dubious prospects of
enactment. And its major in-
vestigative undertaking, a study
:f subsersive influences in city
riots, barely got off the ground
In its opening stages.
Twd of the committee's bills, one
aimed at antiwar groups and the
)ther designed to pump new life
into the moribund Subversive Ac-
tivities Control Board (SACB), are
expected to reach the House floor
later this month.
The antiwar* measure, which
would slap heavy fines and prison
terms on persons or groups trying
to block U.S. troops trains or send-
In blood or supplies to the Viet
Cong or North Vietnam, was pass-
ed by the House late last year
only to die in the Senate.
Tied Up In Committee
Democratic leaders agreed Fri-
day to schedule the bill for debate
after Chairman William M. Col-
mer (D-Miss), of the rules com-
mittee threatened to call it up for
action. The rules committee clear-
ed it for floor debate last June,
but the leaders have sat on it
.nce.
The Johnson administration
considers the measure unnecessary
and a number of Northern and
Western Democrats strongly op-
pose the bill. It passed the House
last year 275 to 64. Its chief spon-
sor is Rep. Joe Pool (D-Tex) third-
ranking Democrat on the commit-
tee.
The other bill, cleared for floor
debate about two weeks ago, is an
attempt to put the SACB back into
business after court decisions took
the teeth out of the 1950 Internal
Securities Act.
Senate Opposition
Even if the House, as is likely,
approves the bill, it faces trouble
from the Senate which ditched a
similar measure in favor of a bill
to disband the SACB if it fails to
hear two cases next year.
The third bill approved by the
lommittee this year would out-
law terroristic acts allegedly per-
formed by-such groups as the Klu
Klux Klan. The committee has no
plans to bring it to the floor.
Rep. John C. Culver (D-Iowa),

threw something of a monkey
wrench into the opening hearing
10 days ago of the investigation
into rioting by question former
light heavyweight boxing cham-
pion Archie Moore about social
and economic causes of rioting.
Chairman Edwin E. Willis (D-
La), and Rep. William M. Tuck
(D-Va), both had made clear the
committe was not interested in
that but before anyone could react,
Moore was answering Culver by
saying that Negroes were upset at
lack of jobs.
Los Angeles Dist. Atty. Evelle J.
Younger told the committee that
the causes of riots are complex

and rejected the notion that they
,ould be blamed on Communists
:r Black Panthers or subversive
groups in general. This brought
some critical question from Rep.
Albert W. Watson (R-S.C.), who
expressed doubt Younger had been
vigilant enough against Commu-
aism.
Although the antiwar bill re-
:,eived strong floor support, and
the committee had no difficulty
in obtaining its funds this year,
those hearings added to doubts
among some influential House
members who say privately they
feel the committee has outlived its
usefulness.

VOICE-SDS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MONDAY
7:00 P.M.-2nd FLOOR SAB
Everyone Welcome!

OPENING SOON
Delicatessen

-- m6wi

at 611 South

Forest

Viet Cong To Free Captives
To'Progressive' Groups
o SAIGON M--The U.S. Mission This was described also as in
called on the Viet Cong yesterday response to the good will of "the
to disclose when and where they progressive people of the United
will turn loose three captive Amer- States who, for the sake of peace
!can sergeants that a Communist and justice, are struggling against
broadcast said would be freed. ;he American imperialists' aggres-
The hitch was that the broad- sion in Vietnam."
Oast said the guerrillas' National The National Liberation Front's
Liberation Front, the Viet Cong, Liberation Radio, monitored in
was ready to hand over the three Saigon, had a different version. It
to their families or "to progres- said the Red command would free
sive American people's organiza- them, not that they had been
tions who come to receive them." freed.
Prisoners Identified U.S. Statement
From garbled Communist trans- John E. McGowan, spokesman
missions, U.S.cauthoritiesehave
mssions, US. authorities have for the U.S. Mission, read to news-
identified the men as M. Sgt. mnen a statement welcoming "the
Daniel L. Pitzer of Spring Lake, annoutcement thatomhngS"th
N.C: M St. dwrd . ohnonannouncement that the South
N.C.; M. Sgt. Edward R. Johnson Vietnamese People's Liberation
f Seaside, Calif., and S. Sgt. Armed Forces Command is releas-
James E. Jackson of Talcott, W' ing three United States prisoners
Ianoi's Vietnam News Agency of war to return to their families
Hanois Vienam Nws Ag ncyi America."
:ame out Friday with the first
word on the case. It quoted the The Communists have previous-
Viet Cong's Giai Phong press agen- ly released four U.S. servicemen.
cy as saying the guerrillas had re- I'wo were returned in December
leased the three after they had 1965 through Cambodia and two
shown "sincere repentance over
the crimes they had committed were returned directly to U.S. for-
against the South Vietnamese peo- %es in South Vietnam last Febru-
ple." ary.

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