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November 03, 1967 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN

'.i' lE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3. 1967

PAGE TEN TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

IN PLANNING STAGE:
National Service
Pro gram Begun

Research

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-A small-scale
"national service" program could
be initiated within the next few
years, if support comes from the
right quarters.
Such a program would give
young people the opportunity to
serve their country in non-mili-
tary endeavors and would meet
educational and manpower needs.
Interested young people would be
matched with service opportuni-
ties consistent with both the needs
of the nation and with their own
education and skills.
The concept of universal na-
tional service has been widely dis-
cussed in recent years. But, al-
though the idea has been sup-
ported by Secretary of Defense
Robert McNamara, it has never
received wide-spread support, pri-
marily because of the conflict
with the draft.
But now, a non-profit organi-
zation called the National Service
Secretariat is seeking support for
a national service program which
would be as far removed from the
Selective Service System as pos-
sible. The secretariat is supported
by private funds, not by the gov-
ernment.
Donald Eberly, executive direc-
tor of the secretariat, said his or-
ganization is attempting to set up
a network of service opportunities
which would work somewhat like
a computer dating system. For
instance, young persons interested
in working for about two years
in some service agency would
feed information about them-
selves into a computer. The com-
puter, in turn, would match each
individual with the service activ-
ity best suited for him.
Eberly sees the program supply-
ing young people to work in such
fields as education, health, con-
servation, community seryice, and
overseas assistance.
Existing agencies, such as the
Peace Corps, the Job Corps,
VISTA, and the Red Cross may
participate in the program and
receive volunteers. But the scope
of the program would be almost

unlimited, Eberly said. "Oppor-t
tunities would be open for some-
one to work in a hospital in Newt
York or to teach in Appalachia,1
for example."
Eberly will be sending out a
proposal explaining the programr
and seeking support within the
near future. The proposal, which
came out of a conference on na-
tional service last spring, will be
sent to both government and1
private agencies.
If service agencies are anxious
to cooperate, and if enough fi-
nancial support is received from
private foundations and industry,;
the program possibly could start,
on a small-scale in a few years-
But Eberly thinks an effective;
national service program - one
that would pay subsistence costs
of service activities for all young-
people-will have to be under-
written by the government be-
cause of high costs ($4-$5,000 per
volunteer). And it is unlikely that
the government will support the
program fully as long as the
Vietnam war continues.
"It will probably be a decade or
two, perhaps by 1980, before we
have a universal program," Eber-
ly said.
'The program would be univer-
sal in the sense of providing
service opportunities for all young
people, men and women, regard-
less of their financial status or
educationalbackground," Eberly
said. He explains that, tradition-
ally, volunteer service agencies
have attracted only middle-and
upper-class people because they
are the only ones who can afford
it.
"A 20-year-old who had to sup-
port his family would be given a
family allowance to send back
home," Eberly said. "This way
everyone would have the same
opportunity.'
Although the secretariat wants
to disassociate the program with
the draft, Eberly admits this is
almost impossible. "As long as the
draft exists, it will affect the
number of people interested in
the program," he said.

(Continued from Page 1)
not yet determined the causes of
these defects, Dr. Brown asserts.
"Yet, only by finding the causes of
these defects can we hope to learn
how to prevent them. Proof that
one or another virus infection in
pregnant women cause the baby's
defects could lead to the develop-
ment of vaccines to prevent these
tragedies."
There is already a vaccine for!
viral disease known to cause birth
defects: German measles. Besides'
confirming the association of Cox-
saxie B with congenital heart dis-
ease, Dr. Brown also hopes to learn
whether other common viruses,
ECHO-9 and influenza, can harm
an unborn child.
Animal sperm cells stored for al-
most three years have been used
to produce pregnancies in the re-
search of Dr. Samuel J. Behrman,
director of the Center for Research
in Reproductive Biology. Freshly
taken cells, in the research, are
preserved with an egg yolk nutri-
ent and glycerol before being
frozen with liquid nitrogen.
Identify, Produce'
"Someday it should be possible,"
Dr. Behrman says, "to identify the
chromosomes responsible for cer-
tain characteristics and produce aI
child with exactly th6 character-
istics desired," Dr. Behrman ex-
plained.
"We have been able to suspend
the male cell for up to two and a
half years and still obtain preg-
nancies. There is every reason to
believe that this suspension can be
prolonged indefinitely."
Dr. Behrman is currently en-
gaged in a study to determine
whether the "IQ and development
of the children produced by artifi-
cial insemination are normal."
Preliminary indications are "that
they are no less well developed."
He stressed that this work is only
a prelude to the future freezing of
an entire human body for later
restoration.
Dr. Behrman is also working on
new methods of contraception, in-
cluding a "morning after" pill
which would prevent the implanta-
tion of the fertilized egg within
the uterus. A second possibility
being explored by Dr. Behrman
and his associates is a "pregnancy
vaccine" which would immunize a
woman against pregnancy for
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4

0

PUBLIC PANEL DISCUSSION
ON THE ROLE OF CLASSIFIED RESEARCH
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

GER R Y VALGORA
BSIE, Penn State
has had a variety of
assignments at our
Lackawanna Plant, near
Buffalo, since joining the
Bethlehem Loop Course.
Recently Gerry was made
assistant to the
superintendent of a section
with 16 foremen and
137 steelworkers.
MANAGEMENT
MINDED?
Career prospects are
better than ever at
Bethlehem Steel. We need
on-the-ball engineering,
technical, and liberal arts
graduates for the 1968
Loop Course. Pick up a
copy of our booklet at your
placement office.
An Equal Opportunity
Employer in the Plans for
Progress Program
BETHLEHEM
STEEL
ELEL

your guide to
gOlc

I
eati

.g

Monday

7:30 P.M.

November 6

H
r ,,,,, t

Now Serving
STEAK, DINNERS
at REASONABLE prices
FILLET ... 1.39
SIRLOIN . 1.33
This includes baked potato,
salad, and texas toast.
217S. STATE
Next to State Theatre

-Natural Science Auditorium
FACULTY PANEL

- Open: Mon., Wed., and Thurs. 4 P.M.-2 A.M.
Open: Fri., Sat., Sun. Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tues.
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE
314 Detroit St. Phone 665-2266
CARRY OUT ONLY FREE DELIVERY
Bar-B-Q Beef Dinner ....... $1.95
1/2 Fried Chicken..... ..... $1.55
Fried Shrimp . .......... $1.60
All Dinners include French Fries and Slaw
SATELLITE RESTAURANT
SUNDAY 4-8 P.M.

40

THOMAS G. GIES
Business School
E. LOWELL KELLY
Psychology
WILLIAM J. LeVEQUE
Mathematics

WILLIAM E. PORTER
Journalism
FREDERICK M. SCHERER
Economics
ROBERT M. THRALL
Math & Industrial Eng.

STEAK and SHAKE
1313 South University
CHAR BROILED STRIP SIRLOIN
Potatoes, Salad, Bread and Butter .........$1.55
LIVER AND ONIONS
Potatoes, Bread and Butter ..................$1.25

Moderator: ROBERT C. ELDERFIELD, Chemistry

Sponsored by:

Senate-Assembly Committee on Research Policies

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141

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