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October 28, 1967 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-28

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1967

THE. MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE. - *tTU1

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY VAEW

s r ur. innc.

ri

UN Asks Pullout
Of Israeli Army
Security Council Debates Proposed
Solutions to Middle-East Conflict

BOMBING HALT NECESSARY:
Proposed Bid for UN Action
In Vietnam Called Dangerous

TUNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (P)-
The 10 nonpermanent members of
the Security Council split yester-
day over two different proposals
for a UN special representative
to go to the Middle East and seek
a settlement of the Israeli-Arab
war of last June.
The split was apparent after a
private, informal meeting of their
representatives.
The council president for Octo-
ber, Japanese Ambassador Sen-
jin Tsuruoka, told reporters two
Soviet Ships,
To Support
Egyptians
By The Associated Press
Seven Soviet warships steamed
into two Egyptian ports yesterday
in a demonstration of armed
backing to Egypt, which in less
than a week has had two serious
clashes with Israel.
One destroyer, a communica-
tions ship and two supply vessels
docked at Port Said at the north-
ern end of the Suez Canal. Hun-
dreds of Egyptians cheered and
waved flags. Officers and men on
the destroyer returned ,the wel-
come with salutes and martial
music.
To the west, two submarines
and a destroyer sailed into Alex-
andria to a tumultuous welcome
by whistling tugs and cheers from
those aboard fishing boats. The
Cairo press described the arrival
of the Soviet warships as a "cour-
tesy call." But it was noted that
the Russians, who first put into
port in July, returned several
units Sept. 4 after a brief Israeli
air raid on Port Said.
The sinking of the Israeli de-
stroyer Elath by Egyptian mis-
siles Oct. 21 and the fierce Is-
raeli-Egyptian c a n n o n a d i n g
across the southern end of the
Suez Canal Tuesday again has
brought the situation to a dan-
gerous stage.
The arrival of the warships was
accompanied by an attack on Is-
rael by the Soviet government
newspaper Izvestia in Moscow. It
declared "any minute the sparks
of the old fire can burst into rag-
ing flames."
Izvestia accused Israeli leaders
of "criminally playing with peace
and. the destiny of their own
country" and charged they were
encouraged by the U.S. decision
this week to send some arms to
Israel.
Izvestia again demanded that
Israel surrender all the Arab ter-
ritory it conquered in the June
5-10 war with Egypt, Jordan and
Syria.
Onathe east bank of the Suez
Canal, an Israel colonel com-
manding forces opposite the Port
of Suez asserted that Algerian,
Kuwaiti and Sudanese. soldiers
had joined Egyptians in a grad-
ual buildup on the west bank.

proposals were put on the table
and the group would meet again
Monday morning to discuss them.
Danish Foreign Minister Hans
Tabor added that Canada and
Denmark had submitted one of
the proposals.
The other one was drafted in
long days of private consulta-
tions by India, Argentina, Brazil,
Ethiopia, Mali and Nigeria.
Informed sources said that the
two plans differed in that the
six-nation proposal was specific
on the aims the special represen-
tative should pursue in seeking
the settlement, while the Cana-
dian-Danishproposal was rather,
vague on that point.
Each proposal was intended toI
become the basis of a resolution
for the council to adopt some time
next week.
The six-nation draft, it was un-
derstood, would set forth basic
principles for a Middle East set-
tlement, including Israeli with-
drawal from the Egyptian, Jor-
danian and Syrian territory
seized in the six-day Arab-Israeli
war in June.
This request was in reference to
the hundreds of square miles of
Egyptian, Jordanian and Syrian
land taken over by Israel in the.
June 5-10 war.
The key point on which in-
structions were awaited was on
the wording of the withdrawal
clause. The Indians want it to
call for Israeli withdrawal to po-
sitions held before the June fight-
ing, while the Latin American del-
egations back a formulation for
withdrawal from "territories oc-
cupied as a result of the recent
conflict."
But sources close to the six ne-
gotiators said this difference
would not stand in the way of
unanimity among them.

-Associated Press |
BOUNDARY DISPUTE SETTLED-
Dignitaries of the United States and Mexico met yesterday at the White House to end a century-oldI
border dispute between the two countries. The foreign secretaries of the nations involved signed
the Chamizal Treaty transferring the land along the Rio Grande River at El Paso and Ciudad
Juarez. From left are: Mexican Foreign Secretary Antonio Carrillo Flores, Mexican President
Gustavo Diaz Ordaz, President Johnson and Secretary of State Dean Rusk. Standing is William
Whittington of the State Department.
IN BALTIMORE:
War Protesters Spill Blood
Over Selective Servi~ce Files

By The Associated Press have many female components
A U.S. bid for United Nations;and militiawomen regularly shoot
action on Vietnam without halt- , at American planes over the
ing the bombing of North Viet- , North, this is the first time wo-
nam would not only be ineffec- ,men soldiers armed as well as
tive but dangerous, a former men are known to have directly
State Department official said engaged in battle against any of!
yesterday. the allied forces in South Viet-
Ernest A. Gross told the Senate nam.
Foreign Relations Committee this Women are generally used by
country should not seek U.N. in- the Communists to assist in
volvement unless it was prepared treating the wounded, handling
to suspend the bombing. supplies and clearing battlefield
Otherwise, he said, the United of bodies and weapons.
States would expose itself to the -
possibility of a formal expression
of U.N. opposition to the air war.Rl
Protests Proposal
Sen. Bourke B. Hickenlooper,
(R-Iowa), protested the proposal
for unilateral action by this coun- paign
"I don't hear many people CHICAGO (M-Governor Ron-
talking about stopping the inva- ald Reagan of California and
sion by North Vietnam," he said. former Vice President Richard M.
"It seems to be all the fault of Nixon denied at separate news
the United States. We are being conferences in Chicago yesterday
made the culprits." an NBC report that they had
Gross. a former assistant sec- reached a "campaign under-
retary of state now a lawyer in standing."
New York City, testified on pro- Reagan told his news confer-
posals to urge President Johnson ence "there are no deals" with
to seek U.N. action. Nixon involving the 1968 Repub-
Meanwhile Democratic Leader lican nomination for president,
Mike Mansfoanasaidand added: "The ,understanding
that about 58 senators now are between Nixon and myself is that
co-sponsoring his resolution ask- I told him I was not a candidate."
ing U.N. action on Vietnam.
Mansfield also said that Soviet Reagan was in Chicago to ad-
Russia and France are proposing dress the Illinois Chamber of
a reconvening of the Geneva Commerce.

In the political field, the lame-
duck Constituent Assembly got a
new speaker. Dinh Xuan Quang,
55, an independent, was approved
41-34 to succeed Phan Khac Suu,
who resigned in a huff after the
assembly validated results of the
Sept. 3 presidential election. Suu
charged fraud in the election, in
which he ran fourth behind Chief
of State Nguyen Van Thieu.
Quang will administer the oath
of office at Thieu's inauguration
as president next Tuesday.
.opefuls Deny
iderStandin'
terday that there was a "cam-
paign understanding" between
Nixon and Reagan that the two
men would not fight each other
for the 1968 GOP presidential
nomination.
NBC News said the plan was to
support Nixon first, and added:
"If he, Nixon, is beaten fair and
square in the first three primar-
ies, then Reagan gets it."
Nixon told a news conference
that he has made no agreements
with any potential contenders
concerning the presidential nom-
inatilon.
"I have no understandings or
agreements with any potential
candidates," Nixon asserted.
:T .

BALTIMORE, Md. (T) - Three
men, including a Roman Catholic
priest, poured blood into file
drawers at a Selective Service of-
fice yesterday to protest "the piti-
ful waste of American and Viet-
namese blood in Southeast Asia."
The demonstrators said the'
blood was their own. They poured{
it from small bottles into 16 file
drawers while a fourth man, a
minister of the United Chruch of
Christ, stood watch at the office
door.

UAW President Postpones
Major Labor Convention

Before and after the men ment property, mutilation of pub- Conference to deal with the
poured the blood from small plas- lie records and obstructing Se- Southeast Asian conflict.
tic bottles, they handed out a lective Service laws. Women Soldiers
prepared statement saying they Two were released after agree- In the war Itself,assquad of
were doing so to protest "the piti- ing to sign a personal $1,000 bond eight Communist women soldiers
ful waste of American and Viet- that they would appear for a pre- made a suicidal attack Wednes-
namese blood, 10,000 miles away." liminary hearing Monday. The day on a U.S. infantry company
Colonel James L. Hayes, state other two, including the priest, that was deployed on ambush pa-
director of Selective Service, said the Rev. Phillip Berrigan, would trol in the jungles 38 miles north
the four walked into the Customs not sign the bond and were of Saigon.
House, where seventeen draft placed in the federal section of Lt. Col. Walter E. Adams of
boards have their offices, carry- the city jail. Washington, D.C., reporting Fri-3
ing a statement which announced The Baltimore Archdiocese of day on the encounter, said four
their intentions. The statement the Catholic Church said in a of the women died under Amer-
idetifieIteas heev, statement that Father Berrigan's ican counterfire. The others es-
Philip Berrigan, chairman of the action appears to be self-defeat- caped, still shooting.
Baltimore Interfaith Peace Mis- ing. Though the Communist forces
sion (BIPM), the Rev. James -____ - ----__
Mengelof, David Eberhardt, sec-
retary of the BIPM, and Thomas
Lewis, a founding member of the
BIPM. COME to the GUIlL D H A LLOWE EN
"We shed our blood willingly
and gratefully in what wet hope
is a sacrificial and constructive
act." the statement said.s I
The four gentlemen came in;PARTY
to our receptionist, Mrs. Annie
Eaton, and apparently asked her
a question or two, said Col. Hayes. Saturday, Oct. 28
"She got up from her desk toj
try and help them and with this 7:30 P.M.
they walked through our recep-
tion barricade of swinging doors(possible)
over to our files, which are, of
course, government property and Dance[to the "Overcoming Bond"
confidential.
"These four gentlemen proceed- GUILD HOUSE 802 MONROE
ed to pull open four file cabinets
-16 drawers-and pour blood in
them.
Asked where they got the blood,

THE ARK
1421 H i ll Street

THE BUDDY JACK TRIO
with Walter Blackwell, Harvey Hill, and Buddy Jack
doing blues, pop-protest, Belefante-type songs,
folk music, and classical guitar.
$1 .00 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments,

NBC News reported earlier yes-
x' Tt'fT IG1

8:30 P.M.

Grads

uate Student Council
BRUNCH

WASHINGTON (]') - Walter
Reuther's postponement of a ma-
jor labor convention was inter-
preted yesterday as strong new
evidence that he plans to pull his
1.5 million United Auto Workers
out of the AFL-CIO.
Reuther, in calling off the No-
vember gathering of the AFL-
CIO's big Industrial Union De-
partment, gave as his reason the
press of auto industry bargaining.
Sources indicated that many in
-the hierarchy of the 14-million
member AFL-CIO think Reuther
canceled the meeting to keep his
hand free for a major confronta-
tion with George Meany at the
AFL-CIO convention in Miami
Beach, Fla., in December.
Meany is president of the AFL-
CIO and has been engaged in a
feud with Reuther for over a
year.
The Industrial Union Depart-
ment, embracing 60 of the AFL-
CIO's 129 unions with some 6%
million members, is Reuther's last

remaining power base in the
giant labor federation.!
Reuther joined with Meany 12
years ago in uniting the old AFL
and CIO.
The other 24 members of the
Industrial Union Department ex-
ecutive board quickly approved
Reuther's request to postpone the
Nov. 15 convention, and report-
edly were relieved to get off a
potential hot spot.
Reuther a year ago used the
Industrial Union Department
convention to begin his assault
on Meany's leadership.
Officials of the department
said the meeting will be re-
scheduled "sometime after the
first of the year" -- which would
be after the AFL-CIO convention.
The Meany-Reuther battle is
the biggest collision of labor's
titans since the AFL-CIO kicked
out the 1.8-million m e m b e r
Teamsters Union on corruption,
charges 10 years ago.!

1l

'
'
!
iii
it
il

(lox and bagels, and ...)

Tomorrow, Oct. 29, at noon

THE HON. GAD RANON
Israeli Consul

ISRAEL: By Right or Sufferance

Affiliates $1

Others $1.25

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill St.

I

Father Berrigan replied, "Suffice
to say that it is our own blood."
All four men were arrested by
the FBI and taken before a U.S.
Commissioner. They were charged
by U.S. Attorney Stephen H.
Sachs with destruction of govern-

CINEMA II

I

presents

r'

World News Roundup

JONI MITCHELL

4

ANTHONY QUINN
GUILIETTA-MASINA

I

in

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. --
' The 122-nation Trusteeship Com-
mittee of the U.N. General As-
sembly approved a resolution yes-
terday demanding that Britain
use force to bring "an effective
and speedy" end to the rebel Rho-
desian government of Ian Smith.
Britain, which ruled Rhodesia
before Smith declared independ-
ence unilaterally in November of
1965, has repeatedly told the
United Nations it will not use
force against the white minority
government.
TEL AVIV, Israel - Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan said
Friday King Hussein of Jordan
was reported to have recognized
Israel as a nation anti said this
was the monarch's "first step
toward realism."
TONIGHT
CURSE OF THE
CAT PEOPLE
dir. Val Newton, 1964

He referred at a news confer-
ence to Hussein's answer in Paris
Thursday to reporters' questions.
Question: Do you consider Is-
rael has a right to exist?
Hussein: I suppose it is a na-
tion, whether we like it or not.
M A D R I D, Spain - Police
clashed with three workers'
groups and with students in Ma-
drid yesterday and broke up dem-
onstrations for higher wages and
the right to organize unions.
The first clash, with 300 stu-
dents, occurred on the campus of
Madrid University. The students,
showing solidarity with the work-
ers, threw stones but were dis-
persed by helmeted riot police
using high pressure water hoses
and dogs.

I

FEDERICO FELLINI'S

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How can this group be the
only contender in the
-V
-
Conpetition being held Oct. 30-Nov 3
at North Campus Commons
0 Bands may obtain opplications and
sign up for times to play at
UAC office in Union or League

LA STR DA
SHORT: Chapter 6, FLASH GORDON

TONIGHT and SUNDAY
8 P.M.-$1.50-after 2nd set-$1.00

FRIDAY
SATURDAY

7 and 9:15 P.M.

50c

I

I

gqJBULJ(Y iOUS~B

AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

woulamma

No

"IN CONCERT"

UNION-LEAGUE

iIuke ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY 4 NOVEMBER

MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB
OHIO STATE MEN'S GLEE CLUB

o

USA

I r'" '1 rD

PLUS: BOB McGRATH-Tenor

THE FAR EAST TOUR SHOW }
(IT'S LIKE A BOB HOPE SHOW)

r

4

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