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October 27, 1967 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE

'NCAA ACTION:
Abrahams:Practice Now, Play Later Purdue, MSU Proba

tion Lifted

By SUSAN SCHNEPP
In the morning you're likely to
see him smiling across campus
with a two-sizes-too-small plaid
hat sort of stuck on top of his
head. He probably says hello to
a dozen kids on his way from Doc
Losh's class to the Diag.
In the afternoon he halls a blue
football helmet out of a locker la-
beled "Brown Giant" and growls
across the 50-yard line at his var-
sity teammates.
In the evening you'd probably
find him studying or lounging
around East Quad, where he's a
resident advisor.
Morris Abrahams known to
teaimates and friends as "Mo", is
a busy fellow, but he must sit idle
on the sidelines at the times when
he'd most like to be in action-
football Saturdays.
Defensive Lineman
Abrahams, a 6'3", 215 lb. sopho-
more, practices as a defensive line-
mar against the first offensive
week, but cannot suit up for the
team every afternoon during the
games. The reason is an NCAA eli-
gibility rule which states that a
player must be in residence at a
school a year before he can play
varsity ball.
There's a story behind his in-
eligibility which Abrahams tire-
lessly explains to everyone who
asks him why he practices with the
varsity but doesn't suit up for
Saturday games.

Abrahams graduated from Ann
Arbor High School in '62, a three-
letter man in football, baseball and
basketball. That fall he attended.
Ferris State College, but had to
drop out after a semester to "earn
more money to go back," he says.
Army Green
Before he could go back, how-
ever, the army whisked him away
and gave him a green helmet to!
wear for two years. Abrahams ser-
ved in the First Field Forces, 30tha
Artillery Batallion in Viet Nam
for a year, seeing action mainly in
Bong Son.
He returned to the States last
November, hauling with him his
prized possession, a Sony 530 tape
recorder, which now fills the sec-
ond floor of Strauss House with
Motown soul music.
Since Abrahams enrolled at Mi-
chigan in the winter term last
year this is only his second semes-
ter in attendance and he is there-
fore ineligible.
"Morris is a fine player--strong
on defense," says Coach Bump
Elliott. "I think he would have a
good chance to play if he were eli-
gible this season. It looks as if he
has good leadership qualities and
he is making a great contribution
to the team even though he's not
playing."
A physical education major, Ab-
rahams' interest and participation
in athletics continues after he
leaves the practice field. He is
athletic director of Strauss- House

and coached the house's intramur-
al football team this year.
"It was great experience," says
Abrahams, who would like to be a
coach some day.
In the winter, Abrahams takes
to the ice for another of his favor-
ite sports-hockey. Abrahams re-
calls that one of the first things
that caught his attention when he
moved here from sunny Panama
11 years ago was the ice. "I skat-
ed and skated," he recounts with
a painful expression, "until my
fingers w e r e frostbitten and
numb."
A man of action, Abrahams,
move onto the dance floor on
weekends for a little boogaloo and
s h i n g a 1i n g, radiating "soul"
throughout the whole room. Ac-
cording to a spokesman for "Par-
ties Unlimited," he's one of their
best "lives of the party."
Abrahams would like to play
professional ball and hopes the pro
scouts will notice him when he
plays here next year. "He has good
potential for pro ball," Elliott
confirms.
But before that he wants to play
ball for Michigan and is working
hard to earn a starting assignment
next season. His biggest reward
for his work this year, Abrahams
says, was an invitation to eat with
the team at the training table a
couple weeks ago, an honor for
anyone not a regular player.
Next year he may be one of the
best fed.

By The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS-The Nation-
al Collegiate Athletic Association
Council, governing body of the
NCAA, has issued new rulings
affecting several schools, includ-
ing two Big Ten schools, Michi-1
gan State and Purdue. The other1
affected institutions are Nebras-
ka, Mississippi State, and Brad-
ley.
Both Michigan State and Pur-
due were restored to good stand-
ing. They had been on probation
for infractions.
Michigan State had been put
on probation in November, 1964,
for improper recruiting practices.
Purdue had been on probation
since October, 1966, for recruit-
ing irregularities.
In other action, the council
barred the Mississippi State bas-
ketball team from post-season
championship contention through
1969 for recruiting and financial
violations.
Nebraska was given a repri-
mand and censure for being in-
volved in the payment of $600 for
repairs to an auto of a prospec-
tive student-athlete.
The council said the youth was
given the money by his employ-
ers, who are identified as having
Nebraska athletic interests.

The penalty is the mildest pre- athletes, who were on campus to
scribed. take entrance exams, free air

Bradley was restored to good'
standing after being on probation
since last year for giving improp-
er financial aid.
Mississippi State, of the Sout-
eastern Conference, was criticized
by the SEC last August for what
it called "the gross negligence or
laxity on the part of Mississippi
State basketball coaches."
The council said Mississippi
State provided two high school

transportation from Starkville,
Miss., the site of an all-star bas-
ketball game in which the two
were to play.
It said Mississippi State also
was guilty of permitting two
prospective recruits to participate
in a basketball workout, and did
not provide a student-athlete
with a written statement detail-
ing the amount, duration, condi-
tions and terms of an athletic
scholarship.

UNIONMIEi
Friday, October 27
9-12 p.in.
Music by the WEST WIND DRIFT

1 .11 -

11

-Daily--Michael Feldberg
MORRIS ABRAHAMS, who is currently working out with the
football team as a defensive lineman, is ineligible to play this
season because of the NCAA transfer rule.

Male Subjects Needed

SST RIKING OUT
(Continued from Page 8)
whetner Thomson was declared eligible or not ... Those who know
the man and have followed him in his work believe that he will
prove worthy of the trust. It will be his last appearance on a college
gridiron and he should, therefore, play with a power and determina-
tion fitting the occasion. Yost says that he will kick the stuffing out
of the Gophers.
"We have a great eleven," said the coach on the eve of the
conflict. "I don't know who will win. If Minnesota has as strong
a team as they think they have, they ought to win. But I can
promise one thing. When we get done with them they'll know
they haven't been in any ping-pong party."
The players are filled with grim determination and are ready to
play the best football that is in them ...
Minnesota's representatives . . . are confident in the extreme,
every man believing that this year the Gopher is to have his turn ...
Besides, they believe that if they trounce Michigan they can claim
national honors as they feel that the Michigan eleven has shown
itself superior to the best in the east .. .
Reports had reached Minneapolis that the Ferry Field grid-
iron was soft and unfit for battle. When the team came south the
Gopher ground keeper was included in the party to lend his efforts
in getting the grounds in shape. He arrived in Ann Arbor yesterday
morning and went directly to the field expecting to find a sea of mud.
He walked about over the hay covered gridiron and found a perfect
field in perfect condition.
"I'm of no use here," said the Gopher ground keeper. "That's
the finest field I ever saw and it's in absolutely perfect condition."
It is to be a great day for Ann Arbor. Every possible preparation
has been made. The town is in gala dress and the police department
has risen to metropolitan heights and taken unto itself a traffic
squad to handle the anticipated jam .
The red and gold of Minnesota will be much in evidence in
the great crowd. Seven cars left the Twin Cities yesterday
afternoon bearing the rooters toward Ann Arbor. They will
arrive this morning laden with enthusiasm and coin. The former
will be utilized in supporting the Gophers, the latter in backing
them. With them will come the Minnesota band of sixty-eight
pieces.
The Michigan band will be on hand to lead the Maize and
Blue rooters as will also "Sully" Sullivan, aided by a corps of assist-
ants. The big block "M" is looked forward to as one of the especial
features of the Wolverine demonstration.
(Coming tomorrow: The Big Game)
BERKELEY:
A NEW KIND OF REVOLUTION
FILM, 7:00 P.M.-Friday, Oct. 27
Multipurpose Room, UGLI
Sponsored by CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST

MOTOR SPORTS:
Rally Attracts Varied Field

By BILL McFALL
Perhaps you noticed the posters
around campus last week announ-
cing the Red Maple Rally. It was
not, as some had thought, an anti-
war assemblage. Instead, it turned
out to be one of the most success-
ful events of the Sports Car Club
of Ann Arbor.
A rally is basically a drive
through the country, turned com-
petitive by the stipulation of a
certain route and a strict average
speed.
To insure that all contestants
follow directions, there are check-
points, or controls, placed at var-
ious locations along the course. At
these controls, each car has its
time recorded. The comparison of
times and speed regulations gives
a quantitative method of scoring,
points being assessed for missing,
on arriving early or late at a con-
trol.
The Red Maple Rally was aptly
named, not only for the season,
but because directions used were
much like those of the annual Ca-
nadian Red Cap Rally, held in
GIBBS & (OX, Inc.
Recruiter will be
On Campus November 3
World's leading firm of
Naval Architects and
Marine Engineers.
One of largest firms in U.S.A.
doingnstrictly design and
* engineering work.

Ontario. Some of these are nomo-
grams, straightline maps, and 'tu-
lip,' diagrams of road intersections.
The vehicles ranged in size from
the zippy Austin Mini-Cooper to
original "Detroit Iron," a 1966
Ford.
Laid out by S.C.C.AA. member
Doug Bain, who has been rallying
extensively for the past six years,
the course ran within a 30 mile
radius of Ann Arbor and had 14
checkpoints.
"Although the route was set up
with small maneuverable cars in
mind," Bain noted, "the length of
the rally made a larger car more
desirable from a comfort stand-
point."
Purists prevailed, however, as a
majority of the entrants drove
familiar foreign and domestic
sports cars, such as Triumph, MG,
Austin-Healy, Corvette, and the
ubitquitous Volkswagens a n d
Porsches.
Since many of the checks were
'off the beaten path', several of the
46 entrees did not finish. Those
that did make it were able to rest

their bones and discuss the rally
over a few refreshments, as the
end of the course was convenient-
ly located at a tavern.
The club plans a Halloween
rally this weekend to be followed
by a free party for all the parti-
cipants.
Anyone is welcome to join the
club or just run their car. Presi-
dent John LaBarre can be reached
at 761-0573 for more information
on upcoming events and member-
ships.
Billboard
All students interested in of-
ficiating Intramural basketball
games must attend a rules meet-
ing, Monday, Oct. 30, at 8 p.m.
in the IM Building. Referees,
who may officiate three games
an evening, Monday through
Thursday, will be paid $2 for
each game. IM basketball com-
mences Nov. 1.

IF

CHANCELLOR ROGER W. HEYNS
University of California at Berkeley
LEADERSHIP AND DECISION MAKING
IN THE MODERN UNIVERSITY
November 10, 1967, 8 p.m.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
A Sesquicentennial Program of the Dept. of Psychology

BETHLEHEM
STEEL

I

I 1

interested in

students and graduates;
a Naval Architecture
0 Marine Engineering
6 Electrical Engineering
! Mechanical Engineering
An Equal Opportunity
Employer M/F

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
WELCOME all delegates to
B.ToBR. C.
-) OCTOBER 27-29

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A deposit of $25 will hold your reservation. Choose the trip to make your Winter
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m

How can this group be the

How can this group be the
only contender in the
Jazz Band Competiion?
a

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