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October 26, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DA '11,V

M' 't? Tb/Cl71.Alt A "tt" A T1f hdr.. l/l1 M!

+AGE IX TUF M a~ltc V L}.Ai

THiURSDAYI , OCLTOBER 26, 1967~

SPLIT OUT.
Well go 50/50 with you on the USA.

I More Schools Spurn Military's Secrecy

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Continued from Page I
versity on a consulting basis.
Many schools tend to discourage
secret research but permit excep-
tions when the particular inter-
ests of their professors touch on
areas related to national defense.
Some schools, however, are mak-
ing fewer exceptions than in the
past.
Last spring, after the Penn
controversy, trustees of New York
University, on the recommenda-
tion of a faculty committee,
adopted a policy requiring that1
all classified projects have theE
"written approval" of the presi-
dent. Prior to that move, approv-
al of such contracts was left to
individual department heads.
A Contract Is Dropped
Already the new policy has re-
sulted in the scaling down of
some secret research. NYU re-j
cently declined to renew a $44,-
000 Defense Department contract
to evaluate chemical warfare
weapons systems. "We discontin-
ued the project after deciding it
wasn't in line with the humani-
tarian purposes of auniversity."
says John R. Ragazzini, dean of
the school of engineering and
science.
To keep secret contracts at a
minimum, Stanford University's
faculty early this year inaugurat-
ed continuous, case-by-case re-
view of new proposals for classi-
fied research. Says William F.
Baxter, professor of law, who
headed a group that recently pro-
posed tougher restrictions on such
research: "We want to head off
the contracts that make you lie
about the kind of research you're
doing." H eadds: "There have
been cases where the Central In-
telligence Agency has attempted

to negotiate contracts here that
would have made us deny the
existence of the project."
Faculty concern about secrecy
has already prompted Stanford to
refuse some Government con-
tracts. The school recently de-
clined an Agency for Internation-
al Development (AID) contract
to start a graduate program in
physics at an Argentine univer-
sity. The proposal called for two
Stanford professors to set up the
program while, in exchange, sev-
eral Argentine students attended
Stanford. AID wanted to review
all research performed by parti-
cipants, professors and students,
with the right to bar publication
if it chose. AID also wanted the
right to demand recall of Stan-
ford professors on the project if
it chose to do so. "These terms
simply were unacceptable," says
a Stanford official.
Despite such cases, some Fed-
eral agencies claim they're trying
to ease contract restrictions.
"We're attempting to eliminate
some problems by expediting de-

don't always satisfy an aroused
faculty or student body.
This month faculty members at
Cornell University voted to rec-
ommend that the school sever ties
with the Cornell Aeronautical
Laboratory, an autonomous Cor-
nell-owned facility that does a:
good deal of secret military re-
search. Controversy developed
this fall when it was learned thea
lab had a classified $1.5 million
contract with the Defense De-
partment to help plan counterin-
surgency projects in Thailand.
Cornell's Center for Interna-
tional Studies, which has a re-
search team of its own in Thai-
land, charges that the lab's proj-
ect "may inflict irreparable dam-
age on the university's teaching
and. research throughout thej
world." The Cornell administra-
tion is currently considering the;
faculty recommendation that the
school disassociate itself from the
lab, and observers say it's likely
the university will take steps in
this direction.

Perhaps to head off such
troubles, Columbia University
earlier this fall turned over to a
newly formed nonprofit corpora-
tion classified research previously
performed at the school's Elec-
tronics Research Laboratory. Co-
lumbia officials say the new cor-
poration, called the Riverside Re-
search Institute, will have no cor-
porate or financial connection
with the university.
Drawing the Line
How to draw the line between
justified and unjustified classified
research for weeks has plagued a
faculty committee at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, whose faculty
senate later this month will con-
sider several possible resolutions
suggested by the committee. The
resolutionsrange from a sug-
gested ban on all secret research
to a proposal that each depart-
ment frame its own policy.
"We couldn't agree on a defi-
nite recommendation," admits
Richard Tobias, an English pro-
fessor who is co-chairman of the
committee. "At first, I wanted to
abolish all classified contracts,
but now I see this issue is com-
plicated beyond all expectations."
The Pittsburgh committee was
formed after disclosures of classi-
fied projects ranging from re-
writing of technical reports on
weapons development to work on
quality-control procedures to
check bomb release mechanisms
developed by industry.
Some faculty members say they
became more receptive to such
projects after Thomas Donahue,
a professor of physics who is
working on a secret project of
his own, argued that "it isn't a
question of good ornevil." Says
Mr. Donahue:; "By no means all
secret research is aimed at kill-
ing people, much of it is defen-
sive. And there are circumstances
where it must be done in a uni-

#

classification where it's reason- Just this Monday 30 Princeton
able to do so," says a Pentagon students were arrested for block-
spokesman. But a Stanford offi- ing entrance to a campus build-
cial says: "We're experiencing ing housing a university-affili-
greater efforts by the Defense ated corporation that specializes
Department and other Federal in secret military research for the
agencies to insert 'right to review' Defense Department. The stu-
provisions into research contracts dents, members of Students for a
that normally wouldn't be classi- Democratic Society, a New Left
fied. This is sort of the backdoor organization, were protesting
approach to classification." Princeton's role as one of 12uni-
Getting Around the Problem versity sponsors of the corpora-
In some cases, universities have tion, the Institute for Defense
attempted to get around the prob- Analyses (IDA), headquartered tn
lems posed by secret contracts by Arlington, Va. A Princeton
forming off-campus affiliates or spokesman says the communica-
wholly-owned, but independent, tions research division of IDA
laboratories where such research leases a building at the univer
can be done. But these effortssugh yprassertsthat
IDA isn't legally part of the uni-
versity and that its research is
independent of the school's. He
observes, however, that "special-
ly trained people in the (Prince-

Al

WIEU~.

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
Dedicated to Mr. Osias Zwerdling, founder of Hillel
TORAH SERVICE
read in the triennal cycle with music by John Planer
Oneg Shabbat Program:
DR. GERDA SELIGSON
Associate Professor of Latin
"The Thought of Rabbi Leo Baeck"
One of the great leaders of Jewish liberalism in Germany
and a personal friend of Dr. Seligson.
John Planer, cantor with the choir led by Steven Ovitsky,
John Spitzer, organist.

ton) environs may be in a posi- versity. A complete ban on classi-
tion to help in the studies it (the fled research would be morally
Sdivision)conducts." indefensible."
-iI

YEA

KIDS!

'I

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UNION-LEAGUE UNION-LEAGUE
SYMPOSIUM '68
The New Moods of Dissent
announces
Petitioning for Central Committee Positions
PUBLICITY CAMPUS COORDINATOR
ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS SPEAKER RELATIONS

'9

Thursday, October 26
7:30 P.M.

A

.9

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