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October 18, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-18

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WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 19, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAG9 SEE

1flNF'~flAV flflTflBI~R IL 15167 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Governors

Ask Program
SRacial Peace

To

Restor(

ABOARD SS INDEPENDENCE
(M)A panel of governors recom-
mended yesterday a vast, costly
campaign to restore racial peace
to American cities and cope with
the "underlying causes of unrest
-inequality and lack of oppor-:
tunity."
Connecticut's Gov. John N.
Dempsey presented the program
to the 59th National Governors
Conference, cruising choppy seas-
toward the Virgin Islands aboard
the Independence. He declared:
"States must accept this respon-
sibility."
Dempsey's 10-member advisory
committee recommended that the
governors make state government
the agent for mobilization of all
America's resources, public and
private, to deal with city ills.
'Call To Action'
"As governors, we issue to the
entire nation a call to action," he
said. "As governors, we have the;
clear responsibility to move im-
mediately to achieve:
-"Assurance of order and re-
spect for law.
-"Full participation by all peo-
ple in the process of government.
-"Physical rehabilitation of
blighted areas.
-"Improved educational and
employment opportunities.
-"Full availability of effective
services to the individual."
Closed Session
Dempsey, a Democrat, did not
discuss the potential cost of the
effort outlined in a 10-page cata-
idgue of enforcement, assistance,
and equal rights action. Presum-
ably, that will be discussed today
when the governors decide at a
closed session what to do about
the proposal.
The 42 state governors aboard
approved a call for cooperative
state use of National Guardsmen
to cope with civil disorders. By
sharing Guard forces in hours of
city crisis, Gov. Otto Kerner, of
Illinois told them, "States will
be able to suppress any disorder,
of whatever intensity, without re-
course to federal troops."
While the business session con-
centrated. on city turmoil, Re-.
publican governors said they
were wary of any move to draft
an endorsement of the President's
Vietnam policy.
Blank Check
John H. Chafee of Rhode Island
said he feared such a resolution
would be cited by Johnson as
blank check backing of his
actions.
Later Gov. Nelson A. Rocke-
Tfeller of New York declared yes-
terday that he does not want to
be president of the United States.
Going beyond his previous dis-
claimers, Rockefeller told news-
men at the Governors Confer-
ence: "I am not a candidate. I
do not intend to be a candidate.
I do not want to be president."
Chafee, promoting Michigan's
George Romney for the presi-
dency, had already warned his
moderate GOP colleagues against
"siting on their hands" in hopes
Rockefeller would one day choose
to run.

HOLD SEPARATE TALKS:
Thant Confers with Goldberg,
Soviet Envoy on Middle East

UNITED. NATIONS, N.Y. (P)-
The top U.S. and Soviet officials
at the United Nations conferred
separately on the Middle East,
yesterday with Secretary-General
U Thant but said they had no
plans to see each other.
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg had an hour-long meet-
ing with thensecretary-general
that followed on the heels of a
40-minute talk between Thant
and Soviet First Deputy Foreign
Minister Vasily V. Kuznetsov.
Kusnetsov, regarded as one of
the top Soviet negotiators, arrived
from Moscow Monday night. '.
Goldberg told reporters after
seeing Thant that the United
States did not know why Kuz-
netsov had come here, but he
added: "I would assume and hope
that in the normal course I would
see him."
The meetings of the American
and Soviet delegates with Thant
were part of a continuing series
of consultations aimed at taking
some steps toward solution of the
Middle East problem through the
Security Council.

U.S. spokesmen refused Monday
to confirm that Goldberg had con-
ferred with Egyptian Foreign
Minister Mahmoud Riad, and
when Goldberg was asked about
it after seeing Thant, he replied
that "if we are to have private
diplomacy, I must respect that."
An informed Arab source said
no agreement had been reached
in the Riad-Goldberg meeting,
and he added that the situation
needed "a lot of clarification."
Diplomatic sources report that
the consultations have the objec-

tive of setting out basic prin-
ciples for a settlement in the
Middle East to serve as guide-
lines for a special representative
whom Thant would be authorized
to appoint.
There appeared to be wide-
spread agreement, including that
of key Arab delegations, that the
principles should center on Is-
raeli withdrawal from Arab ter-
ritory captured in the Arab-Is-
raeli war in June and an end to
the Arab state of belligerency
against Israel.

Union Says
Mexicans
Break Strike
Chavez Blames U.S.
For Failure To Police
Farm Labor Disputes
WASHINGTON (A) - Cesar
Chavez. a farm union leader ac-
cused the Immigration Service
yesterday of failing to stop U.S.
growers from illegally using Mexi-
cans as strikebreaking cheap labor.
"Something like 44,000 people
cross the international boundary
line every day to work on Amer-
ican farms. Many of these work-
ers are used as strikebreakers
whenever we strike any, of the
farms," said Chavez, director of
the AFL-CIO United Farm Work-
ers Organizing Committee.
Chavez said the Mexcans work
for a little as 25 cents an hour
and that immigration officials fear
to step in when farm owners hire
them to break a strike of U.S.
workers.
'Green Carders'
"For instance, when we ap-
proached the Immigration Service
in Bakersfield, Calif., with a re-
quest that they go into the fields
and investigate, we were told
point-blank that they were un-
willing to do so because if they
went behind our picket lines look-
ing for the 'green carders' they
would incur the wrath of the grow-
ers," Chavez said.
The green cards are legal U.S.
residence permits held by Mexicans
who cross the border during the
day to work in the United States
but return home at night.
Abolished "Braceroes'
A Labor Department regulation
prohibits Mexican green card hold-
ers from working where a strike
is in progress unless they were
hired before the strike began.
Chavez said U.S. growers have
resorted increasingly to sponsor-
ing Mexican green card holders
since Congress abolished the old
"Bracero" program permitting
wholesale importation of Mexican'
workers.
They work at low wages on
farms, in restaurants and else-
where, he said.

CHANGE IN POLICY:
China Denies U.S. Withdrawal
From Formosa Key to Peace

TOKYO (M)-Mainland China's
official Communist party news-
paper, People's Daily, says there
can be no peace with the United
States even if American forces are
withdrawn from Formosa, Chiang
Kai-shek's Nationalist stronghold.
The policy, evidently the expres-
sion of foreign policy of the sup-
porters of Chairman Mao Tse-
tung, appears to knock the props'
from under the argument, often
advanced by Peking in the past,
that only the U.S. military pres-
ence in the area blocks peace in
the Pacific.
The newspaper made the state-
ment in an article Monday to dis-
credit an earlier statement by
Mao's chief foe in the current
"Cultural Revolution" that "once
U.S. imperialism withdrew its
troops from Formosa China would
develop friendly relations with it."
That statement, by the now dis-
graced President Liu Shao-chi, was
pictured by People's Daily as a be-
trayal of "proletarian internation-
alism,",and as giving the impres-
sion that China though only of
its own territorial interests.
The paper appeared to make it
official that the Mao foreign pol-
icy had prevailed in the current
purge struggle.
"The Chinese people," the paper
said, "will resolutely adhere to the
general line of the foreign policy
laid down by Chairman Mao, unite
with all oppressed people and na-
tions of the world, form the
broadest possible united front
against U.S. imperialism and frus-
trate all its aggressive and war
plans."
Although the Maoists now ac-
cuse President Liu of being the
architect of policy leaving the door
open to peace with the, United
States, the line in fact was laid
down on several occasions by Pre-
mier Chou En-lai and Foreign
Minister Chen Yi, both now in the
Mao camp.

.Asocated res
FIRST-HAND LOOK
President Mohammed Ayub Khan of Pakistan, left, shows his
speech to French President Charles de Gaulle before delivering it
at Orly Field, outside Paris, yesterday. The Pakistan chief of state
arrived in France for a three-day official visit.

Conmission Asks Reform
Of Federal. Budget System

WASHINGTON (T) - A new
unified blueprint for the federal
budget was proposed to President
Johnson yesterday to clarify the
government's three-headed book-
keeping and to end charges of
fiscal gimmickry.
The plan was presented by
David M. Kennedy, chairman of a

World- News Roundup

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Without a
dissenting vote, the House Armed
Services Committee approved a
pay raise for 3.5 million service-
men yesterday designed to keep
pace with a pending three-stage
boost for federal civilian em-
ployes.
4. * *
MERIDIAN, Miss. - The nine-
day-old trial of 18 white men
charged with conspiracy in the
1964 slaying of three young civil
rights workers moved to within
a step of the jury yesterday.
* * *
DETROIT-Bargainers for the
Ford Motor Co. and the United
Auto Workers, doggedly search-
ing for a new contract, returned
yesterday to the negotiating table
less than eight hours after end-
ing their longest meeting since
the union struck Ford 42 days
ago.
One bargaining table source
said he was "pessimistic" about
quick agreement on the terms of
a new contract, even if talks con-
tinued at this pace through to-
night.
* * *
MOSCOW - The unmanned
Soviet spaceship Venus 4 ap-
proached the planet Venus yes-

terday seeking information on its
atmosphere and possibly attempt-
ing the first soft landing on
earth's sistei planet.
* * *
WASHINGTON - Sen. Everett
M. Dirksen said yesterday that a
filibuster is being waged against
his bill to reactivate the Sub-
versive Activities Control Board
but that it won't prevent passage.
Sen. William Proxmire (D-
Wis), leading the opposition, has
been s p e a k i n g sporadically
against the bill. He has been
vague about when it might be
brought to a vote.

16-member President's Commis-
sion on Budget Concepts. He said
the experts tried to produce "a
budget that makes sense to Con-
gress and the public."
Johnson will use the new for-
mat and some of the specific
changes in his fiscal 1969 budget,
already being prepared for sub-
mission to Congress in January.
Some changeovers, however, will
take until 1971. A few may be re-
jected.
"The commission's most impor-
tant recommendation," said the
report, "is that a unified sum-
mary budget statement be used
to replace the present three or
more competing concepts that
are both confusing to the public
and the Congress and deficient
in certain essential character-
istics."
The 109-page book, reflecting
studies begun last March, went
on:
"The new concept will make
terms such as administrative
budget, consolidated cash budget,
and national income accounts
buget obsolete, and continued use
of such terms should be discour-
aged."

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BUSH HOUSE S.Q.
challenges
HUNT HOUSE S.Q.
toca
Tug-of-War over the Huron
Homecoming Saturday, Oct. 21
9:30 A.M.
(after Gomberg-Taylor Tug)

t
A
D'
Pi

- - --- 'I

I

THIS WEEK AT
ThE ARK
1421 Hill Street

8:3 0 P. M.
THURSDAY -
CONFRONTATION on VIETNAM
Debating on Government Policy
Defending -JOHN J. TAYLOR
Foreign Service Officer with the State Department
working on Peking Foreign Relations
Dissenting - RHOADS MURPHEY
Geography Professor and on the Staff of the
Center for Chinese Studies
Moderating - RICHARD SOLOMON
Political Science Professor and on the Staff of the
Center for Chinese Studies
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-
DAVE SIGLIN and SHELLY POSEN
(of Toronto, Canada)
Singing City Folk Music-playing 6 and 12 string guitar and banjo

I!

UN ION-LEAGUE
BUY
HOME-
COMING
G

YOUNG DEMOCRATS PRESENT:
TTHE-FILM
'"1000 DAYS
WED., OCTOBER 18 Angell Hall Aud.A
Showings 7, 8,9 P.M. Donation $50
f4

I

Iir ve* i9t

I

SILVER THROAT / iII Cosby Sings 1709
WARNER
EROS.
...ORD

presents the
VIENNA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

.
_

--_-_ ,

OUSFj

C
K

I

I

Thurs., Oct.*19, 8:30
in HILL AUDITORIUM

Tonite!

Tonite!

PROGRAM:

Symphony No. 6 in C major ...... Schubert

I

4 E

I I I

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